Viewing entries in
Await The Dawn

No Peace For The Wicked

Comment

No Peace For The Wicked

You’d think in the wake of a sale of over a 100 lots and all of its attendant comings-and-goings (not to mention the politics!) there’d be a bit of respite for Team Summerhill. Not a word of it: the next lot for the Emperors Palace Summer Ready To Run Sale are already in and grabbing the attentions of Michael Booysen, Thabani Nzimande, Tarryn Liebenberg and co

Comment

Where to now?

Comment

Where to now?

There’s one thing about time in the racing game; it lends a perspective to your thinking. We’ve had a bit of time to reflect on the outcomes accruing from last week’s CTS Johannesburg Ready To Run Sale, as well as the contingency plans we’re having to make in the wake of Await The Dawn’s passing.

Comment

The Sun Sets on Await The Dawn

3 Comments

The Sun Sets on Await The Dawn

You never want to have to write an obituary, but there’s an old saying in the horse business that if you’ve got livestock, there’s an inevitability to it. While covering a mare on Sunday, second-season sire Await The Dawn succumbed to a freak accident which cost him his life.

3 Comments

Stack The Odds In Your Favour

Comment

Stack The Odds In Your Favour

There are more “old wives’ tales” around the breeding of racehorses than any other game. At last, the scientists have brought some precision to the table, by isolating the SPEED GENE. Every stallion on Summerhill has been tested, and now we can predict with accuracy, what he’s likely to throw.

Comment

When it comes to generosity, you can't beat racing

Comment

When it comes to generosity, you can't beat racing

In a world characterised by promotional hyperbole and information overload, the events they advertise sometimes fall short of their billing. Yesterday, Summerhill held its 31st annual Stallion Day at the School of Equine Management Excellence, and the occasion was dignified by the presence of heads of state, cabinet minsters, representatives of three different royal families, close on 20 different countries and more than 500 guests.

Comment

Comment

IN THE FLESH... FOR THE FIRST TIME

Royal Academy was a Group One winner at 1200 and 1600 metres. His only Group One winning son at 1200 and 1600 metres is Ato. The best son worldwide of the best American sire since Bold Ruler in 2012/13, was Await The Dawn.

Comment

Comment

PAGEANTS, PAUPERS AND PLAYWRITES

I was a trader by birth and a lawyer by profession, but I have to say, deep down I harboured a secret yearning to be a jockey, a pop star or a Springbok fly half. In that order. I was too big to be Michael Roberts, too gruff to be Neil Diamond and too slow to be Naas Botha. So here I am, a horseman by default.

Comment

Comment

ARE YOU ON THE LIST? "RACING'S BEST DAY OUT."

Summerhill’s Stallion Day is firmly glued on the racing calendar.
Last year, more than 500 people from 23 different nations attended.
Unveiling the world class racehorses Await The Dawn and Ato
for the first time in the “flesh”.

Comment

Comment

FAME AND GLORY

The field for the most famous three-year-old race in the world goes postward at Epsom, England on Saturday. The modern history of the Investec English Derby (Gr.1) has been dominated by three of the best Classic stallions of all time, Sadler’s Wells and his sons Galileo and Montjeu, who between them have maintained a vice grip on the outcome not only of the Derby, but also of its “sister”, the Oaks.

Comment

Comment

MONEY TALKS

The latest news is that the heady days of the R200,000 plus service fees are back in vogue; several stallion masters are apparently headed that way, which leaves some leeway for the next tier in the R100,000 plus bracket to ratchet theirs up a few notches.

Comment

Comment

RANDOM RAMBLINGS

Await The Dawn

(Photos : Summerhill Archives)

A Giant among Giants

mick goss
mick goss

Mick Goss

Summerhill CEOOn the eve of my departure for Australia, I drew attention to the achievements of the sons of Giant’s Causeway at stud (read here), in an obvious shot at a “commercial” for our new resident stallion, Await The Dawn. I might’ve saved myself this piece of dictation if I’d known that the Sporting Post’s breeding expert, Sarah Whitelaw, was going to do the job so eloquently for us (read here). The issue was obviously topical: America’s Paulick Report (read here) did the same. Among the emerging elite in the “sires-of-sires” department, Giant’s Causeway already has five sons at stud with the distinction of having produced a Group One winner: Shamardal, Foostepsinthesand, Intense Focus, First Samurai while another son, Morning Raider, is the sire of the exceptional Chilean filly Amani. Shamardal long ago passed the double figures mark in Group One winners, “Footsteps” and First Samurai each have a trio, and Intense Focus crossed the threshold with his Middle Park hero, Astaire, from his first crop.

At the beginning of March, Aqueduct Park in New York hosted the famed Gotham Stakes (Gr.3), the race which announced the three-year-old “arrivals” of Secretariat, Gone West, Seeking The Gold, Gulch, Easy Goer and Visionaire; the Gotham was won in fine style by Samraat, an unbeaten son of the Stakes placed Noble Causeway, who stands at our old friend Becky Thomas’ former farm, Sequel Stallions in upstate New York. Samraat now heads for the Kentucky Derby via the Wood Memorial (Gr.1) where he is bound to feature among the favoured “chalks”.

Given his record to date as racing’s number one up-and-coming stallion-maker, breeders should take little prompting about the prospects of Giant’s Causeway’s world-class son, Await The Dawn, who was the “Iron Horse’s” best racing son world-wide in 2012.

Three quarters of a century: still going strong

Sticking with the United States, as I was paging through Sunday’s edition of the Thoroughbred Daily News, my mobile buzzed with a call from an American number. It was my old friend Jean Cruget, an American Hall of Fame inductee for his feats as one of that country’s most-feted riders, and especially remembered for his connection with the Triple Crown giant, Seattle Slew, patriarch of the enormously potent A.P. Indy tribe. He phoned to remind me that it was his 75th birthday, and especially to find out whether all the young ladies he’d met on his trip to South Africa last year (all ladies under the age of 75 are “young” in Jean’s book!) were aware of this milestone in his life. You have to give it to him, he was a never-say-die sort as a jockey, and he doesn’t look like going down in a hurry in his new life either.

The New Zulu War Cry

When Coolmore Australia’sTom and Sophie Magnier visited us for Tom’s keynote address at our annual Winter School in the Hall Of Fame Theatre last July, they took time out to sample a bit of our local countryside. Blown away by their trip to PhindaGame Reserve, they named a smart son of Champion Australian sire, Fastnet Rock, “Zululand”. Bought with the express hope of making him into a top stallion one day, Zululand obliged his owners on Saturday with a stirring display on his Stakes debut in the VRC Sires’ Produce (Gr.2), and looks a proper contender for top honours in Australia’s major juvenile events during the Sydney Autumn carnival. Good on yer, fellers!

Pity about Wednesday night’s cricket.

Summerhill Stud Logo
Summerhill Stud Logo

Enquiries :

Linda Norval +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email linda@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

Comment

Comment

IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF A GIANT

Await The Dawn

(Photos : Summerhill Archives)

“We can’t think offhand of a comparatively young stallion whose sons

are making a greater impression at stud than the three-time

American champion, Giant’s Causeway.”

Claiborne Farm in Kentucky was once the marquee stallion station of the world. Hark back to Sir Gallahad III, Nasrullah, Bold Ruler, Nijinsky, Mr. Prospector, Danzig and Secretariat, the list is endless; now they have War Front, widely touted as Danzig’s clone, but it doesn’t end there; the yellow and black-trimmed whitewashed buildings are once again bathing in sunlight. At Gulfstream Park on Sunday, Claiborne unveiled a fresh luminary in the time-honoured Donn Handicap (Gr.1) when Lea came home in commanding fashion ahead of last season’s champion three-year-old colt, Will Take Charge.

Stallions are the life-blood of any farm of Claiborne’s scale, and in Lea, they’ve not only uncovered one of obvious potential, but they’ve also found confirmation that in his own sire, First Samurai, there is another string to the War Front bow. Just a few days back, the world’s number one stallion guru, Bill Oppenheim identified the ten stallions which in his opinion represented the Northern Hemisphere’s best value in the under £25,000 (or Euros or dollars, if you wish) range. While these are obviously not yet the world’s elite commercial stallions, they nonetheless represent a formidable crust in what remains a fairly expensive bracket, and besides the already much-acclaimed Shamardal (who belongs in the upper echelon), Oppenheim put his finger on three sons of the emerging sire of sires, Giant’s Causeway among those ten.

First Samurai was obviously among them, having already put up his hand with three Grade One aces from just a few crops at the races, the other being the juvenile Executiveprivilige, and the sprinter, Justin Philip, whose exceptional exploits found a place at the fabled Darby Dan stallion station. Another was Footstepsinthesand, of who Oppenheim said “it seems every time you turn around there’s a “Footsteps” showing good form in decent company” and “he’s deservedly getting very popular now”. Of Frost Giant, he commented “he’s sure made an impressive start, and he has a really impressive pedigree, too”.

While this might be a wild guess, we can’t think offhand of a comparatively young stallion whose sons are making a greater impression at stud than the three-time American champion, Giant’s Causeway, and for those who patronised Await The Dawn in his first season here in 2013, this news will surely come as a comfort. Last Friday, the European Bloodstock News carried a column on this celebrated racehorse’s first season at stud, and a stellar “book” which included Bridal Paths (Thekweni Stakes, now Gr.1); Checcetti (Gerald Rosenberg Stakes, Gr.2); Coastal Waltz (E. Cape Horse Of The Year and dam of No Worries); Dignify (Golden Slipper Stakes, now Gr.1 and dam of Stakes winner, Distinguished); Dream Starling (dam of Group performer, Cookie Monster); Fisani (Fillies Guineas and Gerald Rosenberg heroine); Nadira (dam of Showmetheway); Precedent (Flamboyant Stakes, Gr.3); multiple Stakes winner Princess Sassi; Real Red (Gr.2 performer); Surfer’s Eye (dam of Gr.1 filly, Admiral’s Eye and Stakes performers Saltwater Girl and Rapid Flow) and Winning Glory (Stakes winning dam of South Africa’s winning-most racehorse, Hear The Drums).

It’s worth noting too, from a planning perspective, that Giant’s Causeway himself has had significant success in line-breeding experiments with daughters of his own grandfather, Storm Bird, no better exemplified by the fact that in crosses with daughters of Thunder Gulch, he’s achieved an excellent 19% Stakes winners-to-foals ratio. While there’s not a great deal of Storm Bird blood per se in this country, other than through Await The Dawn’s own grandsire, Storm Cat, at the physical level, there are several permutations which might be worth pondering. The use of daughters of Var (especially), Tiger Ridge, Black Minnaloushe, Tiger Dance and Mogok as potential foils for a horse who stands head and shoulders above any other member of the local tribe in his racecourse performances, would yield a similar theoretical outcome and could be rich in dividends, provided breeders make judicious use of the appropriate complimentary types.

Summerhill Stud Logo
Summerhill Stud Logo

Enquiries :

Linda Norval +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email linda@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

Comment

Comment

ON THE SHOULDERS OF A GIANT...

Await The Dawn Stallion
Await The Dawn Stallion
Summerhill Stud Logo
Summerhill Stud Logo

Enquiries :

Linda Norval +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email linda@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

Comment

Comment

STORM IN A TEACUP

Storm Cat
Storm Cat

Storm Cat

(Photo : Paulick Report)

“The truth is that Storm Cat would currently enjoy a huge lead on the broodmare table if he received credit for the tremendous results achieved this year by his daughters’ Japanese runners.”

When it comes to hit rates in this country, there’s never been any sireline more effective than Storm Cat’s. Var, Tiger Ridge, Black Minnaloushe, Mogok, Tribal Dance, they all speak eloquently for their heritage, hence the presence at Summerhill of Brave Tin Soldier and Await The Dawn.

Andrew Caulfield - During his racing career, Storm Cat was pretty good at coming out on top in a close finish, showing the sort of spirit which was to become a feature of his progeny’s success story. He won his second start by a neck and three starts later he pushed his nose ahead of Danzig Connections to take the GI Young America Stakes. Unfortunately, he couldn’t quite repeat the display against Tasso in the GI Breeders’ Cup Juvenile, when he led virtually everywhere but the finish line.

Storm Cat appears to be involved in another very tight finish this year, this time in his role as broodmare sire, and I use the word “appears” advisedly. According to the Blood-Horse on December 9, the former Overbrook star ranks second to A.P. Indy, with Storm Cat’s total of $14,635,997 lagging just $42,365 behind his rivals.

But, the small print includes “as supplied to The Blood-Horse by The Jockey Club Information Systems, Inc., earnings exclude monies from Japan and Hong Kong.” (Note: TDN sire lists also do not contain earnings from Japan or Hong Kong). I mentioned my puzzlement over this arbitrary exclusion in a TDN piece nearly two years ago: “I guess that this is done because the prize-money in those countries is deemed disproportionate to that in the majority of other countries and can therefore slant the statistics,” I suggested.

Statistics from the International Federation of Horseracing Authorities confirm that prize-money in Hong Kong and Japan are at a different level. The average prize-money per race in 2012 was equivalent to €110,947 in Hong Kong and €45,851 in Japan, whereas the figures for the U.S. and Canada were €16,136 and €20,013, respectively. But Hong Kong and Japan aren’t the only countries capable of distorting the figures. The average for the 320 races staged in the United Arab Emirates equated to €103,865. Yet, inconsistently, these races are included in the Jockey Club’s figures.

This year, Darshaan ranks third on the table behind A.P. Indy and Storm Cat, but he owes nearly $3.5 million (virtually a quarter of his total) to the UAE exploits of Sajjhaa. Similarly, the 15th-ranked Acatenango owes $6 million of his total to Animal Kingdom’s victory in the G1 Dubai World Cup. Meadowlake and Arch are other substantial beneficiaries from the World Cup meeting.

If a daughter of Storm Cat had supplied the winner of one of these fabulously rich prizes in Dubai, the stallion would have been given the credit, but not if the victory came in Japan or Hong Kong. It doesn’t make sense! Perhaps it would be preferable if The Jockey Club provided two tables, one all inclusive and the other without Japan, Hong Kong or the UAE.

The truth is that Storm Cat would currently enjoy a huge lead on the broodmare table if he received credit for the tremendous results achieved this year by his daughters’ Japanese runners. He currently ranks fourth on Japan’s table of broodmare sires, thanks principally to Kizuna (Jpn) (Deep Impact) (G1 Japanese Derby), Ayusan (Jpn) (Deep Impact) (G1 Japanese 1,000 Guineas) and the excellent Lord Kanaloa (Jpn) (King Kamehameha) (a Group 1 winner in the Takamatsunomiya Kinen, Yasuda Kinen and Sprinters Stakes). With support from their fellow group winners Hiraboku Deep (Jpn) (Deep Impact) and Red Spada (Jpn) (Taiki Shuttle), they have built a total of ¥1,922,941,000, which I believe equates to $18,658,470.

Of course, Storm Cat also received a boost of around $1.1 million when Lord Kanaloa thrashed an international field of sprinters to record his second success in the G1 Hong Kong Sprint Sunday. In the process, the son of King Kamehameha improved his career figures to an impressive 19-13-5-1. Add all this to the earnings of Storm Cat’s daughters’ earnings elsewhere in the Northern Hemisphere and you arrive at a staggering total of more than $34,000,000. Not bad for a year’s work!

Of course Storm Cat’s broodmare daughters have also had something of a banner year in the U.S., enjoying the limelight via the likes of Close Hatches, Sahara Sky, Honor Code, Global View, Govenor Charlie, Tapicat and Noble Tune. Now the name of the very promising Streaming can be added to the list, following her triumph in the GI Hollywood Starlet Stakes on only her second start.

The last few weeks have seen some spectacular prices for young Group 1-winning fillies and mares, such as Chicquita (Ire) (Montjeu) (€6,000,000), Dancing Rain (Ire) (Danehill Dancer) (4,000,000gns) and Immortal Verse (Ire) (Pivotal) (4,700,000gns). The sky would probably also be the limit were Streaming ever to be offered for sale. After all, she is a granddaughter of Better Than Honour, the brilliant broodmare whose price soared to $14 million when she was offered at Fasig-Tipton in 2008.

Streaming’s dam Teeming repaid less than $70,000 of the $1,500,000 she had cost as a weanling, but she won three of her four starts as a 4-year-old. Although not in the same class as her Belmont Stakes-winning siblings Rags To Riches (A.P. Indy) and Jazil (Seeking the Gold), she is making amends as a broodmare, Streaming being her fifth winner from five foals. There are similarities between Teeming’s pedigree and that of Rising Tornado, the dam of this year’s two-time Grade I-winning filly Close Hatches (First Defence). Both are daughters of Storm Cat and both have the celebrated Best In Show as their third dam. Also, their respective Grade I winners in 2013 were sired by members of the Mr. Prospector male line, Close Hatches being by First Defence and Streaming by Smart Strike.

As a son of Mr. Prospector, Smart Strike had obvious appeal as a mate for Teeming. For a start, Jazil was sired by another son, Seeking the Gold, and Kingmambo, Jade Hunter and Miswaki are other sons of Mr. Prospector with a Grade I winner to their credit from the Best In Show family.

Smart Strike also sired that good filly Denomination, a four-time Grade III winner at up to a mile and an eighth in France and the U.S., from another Storm Cat mare. The Smart Strike/Storm Cat partnership also has another talented juvenile filly this year in the shape of Fascinating, beaten only half a length by She’s A Tiger in the GI Del Mar Debutante and a length by Secret Compass in the GI Chandelier Stakes.

Extract from Thoroughbred Daily News

Comment

Comment

MYTHICAL MAGIC

Summerhill Broodmares
Summerhill Broodmares

“Wherever you go these days, you hear breeders and bloodstock advisors telling you to concentrate your buying-power on “Black type” performance in the selection of mares at the expense of all else, and while that’s all very well, in life, it’s always a matter of what you can afford.”

Mick Goss - Summerhill CEO
Mick Goss - Summerhill CEO

Mick Goss

Summerhill CEOLike no other business I know, racing abounds with “urban legends”. It’s partly the product of the mystique (or the lack of understanding) that surrounds the breeding of racehorses, and it’s partly a matter of “personality” (or the colour of the game’s characters). Whatever it is, we’re not short of theories or opinions, and the events of the past fortnight have served to explode a couple of the myths.

One of these is that old mares are incapable of producing good horses; another is one which is gaining traction at the moment, and that is that commercial appeal in mares is the strict preserve of Group winners. And then, we have the old “hardy annual” which has its deep-rooted genesis way back in the late 1960s, when Sir Ivor burst onto the British Classic scene with stunning victories in the Guineas and the Derby, quickly followed by Nijinsky’s plunder of their Triple Crown. Both these horses represented what the pundits of the time called American “speed”, and breeders throughout Europe were quick to jettison their top mile-and-a-half performers for their new Stateside cousins, when prospecting for stallions.

The first of the events to highlight the nonsense of some of these theories was the Ready To Run Sale a fortnight ago. The best-performing mares at the sale in terms of prices fetched by their progeny, (at least as far as the Summerhill draft was concerned,) were the oldest ones, and they also happened to be among the lesser-performed during their racing careers. Wherever you go these days, you hear breeders and bloodstock advisors telling you to concentrate your buying-power on “Black type” performance in the selection of mares at the expense of all else, and while that’s all very well, in life, it’s always a matter of what you can afford. Black type “costs”, simple as that, and it’s not everyone who can afford it when their stud operations are still in their infancy. The one thing you do need on your side though, when you’re short on cash, is to be long on patience and the instinctive skills involved in selection. If you’re not able to afford racing class, you have to be particularly circumspect in evaluating what you’re buying, and later on when you’re retaining fillies for stud, on what you’re keeping. And unless you’re in an awful hurry, remember that building families can be a long (and sometimes frustrating) exercise; in the end though, when the plan comes together, there’s no greater reward.

Our “bankers” in the broodmare department at the Ready To Run were a quintet of dear old ladies who’ve been part of the Summerhill scene for the best part of two decades or more. A modestly performed bunch whose credentials, if you didn’t know otherwise, might’ve been questioned in terms of their eligibility for a stud which has stood at the head of the nation’s breeding affairs for the past nine consecutive seasons. The truth is, these ladies have been as fundamental an ingredient in earning those championships as anything else, hence their current commercial appeal. We won’t bother our readers with a dissertation on each, because the facts are plain to see from the table below, other than to say that they all serve to remind us that when it comes to selection, a good eye and a good mind can be just as good as a big chequebook.

MARE DATA 2013

BLUSHING SUMMER

Jallad - Cape Summer (Harry Hotspur)

1994 - unplaced

Progeny

Name

Sire

DOB

Sex

Price

(ZAR)

Progeny

Earnings

(ZAR)

1999

Bashful Badger

Badger Land

08/09

f

65,750

2000

Brock

Badger Land

14/08

c

170,000

254,300

2001

Eze Village

Fard

13/11

c

45,000

2002

MAJESTIC SUN

Kahal

25/10

c

90,000

395,480

2003

Red Carnation

Russian Revival

20/10

f

70,000

152,520

2004

SUN CITY

Kahal

16/10

c

260,000

501,575

2005

Sun Emperor

Labeeb

03/11

c

170,000

378,725

2006

Libalele

Labeeb

17/11

c

200,000

2007

Beau Solei

Kahal

12/11

c

280,000

2008

Miss K

Kahal

04/11

f

400,000

313,943

2011

Mababala

Trippi

12/09

f

325,000

2013

Visionaire

2.010,000

2,062,293

Total Cash

Generated

4,072,293

VANISH

Coastal - Cahard (Lyphard)

1992 - 3 wins, R103,838, at 3 to 4, 2000m, placed 6 times

Progeny

Name

Sire

DOB

Sex

Price

(ZAR)

Progeny

Earnings

(ZAR)

1999

Alias

National

Emblem

13/10

c

90,000

36.785

2000

DISAPPEAR

Muhtafal

14/10

c

160,000

941,780

2002

Evanesce

Kahal

20/09

f

60,000

199,250

2003

Mystic

Albarahin

30/10

c

90,000

670,375

2004

Masithela

Kahal

28/10

f

250,000

2007

Chekeche

Kahal

15/10

f

475,000

260,650

2008

Sithela

Malhub

25.08

c

60,000

135,175

2010

Casha

Stronghold

05/09

f

240,000

50,000

2011

Trust The Pink

Mullins Bay

15/09

f

200,000

2012

Visionaire

04/10

c

1,625,000

2,294,015

Total Cash Generated

3,919,015

COUSIN LINDA

Badger Land - Cousin Lucy (Foveros)

1997 - 1 win, 1 place 1300m C Laird 1999 NYS R190,000

Progeny

Name

Sire

DOB

Sex

Price

(ZAR)

Progeny

Earnings

(ZAR)

2002

Prime Directive

Muhtafal

26/08

c

475,000

403,080

2003

REBEL KING

National Emblem

24/09

c

210,000

2,043,510

2004

Ntabankulu

Muhtafal

08/10

c

w/d

73,995

2005

Relative Value

Jallad

11/10

f

120,000

2007

Uncle Tommy

Kahal

24/08

c

2,400,000

792,515

2009

REBEL QUEEN

Kahal

21/10

f

280,000

437,200

2010

Cousin Anne

Kahal

12/10

f

320,000

2011

Close Relative

Kahal

23/11

f

500,000

4,305,000

3,750,300

Total Cash Generated

8,055,300

NORDIC AIR

Northern Guest - Laughing Music (Luthier)

1989 - 2 places

Progeny

Name

Sire

DOB

Sex

Price

(ZAR)

Progeny

Earnings

(ZAR)

1994

Saint-Andre

Salaadim

27/09

c

132,385

1995

Blazer

Desert Team

10/01

g

22,848

1999

ICY AIR

Jallad

12/02

m

60,000

1,264,905

2000

Hager

Fard

12/02

c

50,000

2003

Nordic Red

Muhtafal

18/09

c

475,000

234,855

2004

Mntwana

Fort Wood

26/10

f

675,000

2005

Gagasi

Malhub

31/10

f

110,000

2006

Clemo

Jallad

10/12

c

160,000

38,750

2007

ICE AXE

Solskjaer

11/12

c

375,000

1,100,000

2011

Kosava

Kahal

12/09

f

500,000

2,405,000

2,793,743

Total Cash Generated

5,198,743

GARDEN VERSE

Foveros - Wild Hyacinth (Royal Prerogative)

1991 - unraced

Progeny

Name

Sire

DOB

Sex

Price

(ZAR)

Progeny

Earnings

(ZAR)

1996

Desert Bloom

Desert Team

24/09

c

33,000

42,438

1997

Full Spectrum

National Emblem

27/09

m

150,000

209,655

1998

Enchanted Gift

Northern Guest

24/09

c

n/s

39,450

1999

Prima Versa

Jallad

10/01

g

110,000

312,875

2000

Sonnet

Personal Hope

10/01

m

150,000

24,150

2003

SPRING GARLAND

Rambo Dancer

28/10

f

180,000

576,480

2004

IMBONGI

Russian Revival

26/10

c

150,000

8,800,000

2006

MAHUBO

National Emblem

10/09

c

900,000

1,500,000

2007

Victory Garden

Solskjaer

09/09

f

1,500,000

42,600

2008

The Planter

Solskjaer

03/10

c

3,173,000

11,547,648

Total Cash Generated

14,720,648

For the record, when Nordic Air went to stud, she had little to recommend her as a non-winner, except for a one-time winning own sister, the fact she was a daughter of Northern Guest, in whom we had faith but whose prowess as a major broodmare influence was as yet unknown, and a French Classic-producing maternal grandsire in Luthier. There were no IcyAirs, Ice Axes, or Amphitheatres on her “page” yet: that was up to her and her sister, Great Attraction.

Garden Verse was a cripple with a severely dropped hip when she was returned to the farm to offset a debt, and was run out with the cows till she was strong enough to face service. These days, it takes an accountant a morning to tot up her accruals. Blushing Summer was small, Senor Santa was a distant cousin, and in age when the internet was a mile away, if you didn’t know your pedigrees, you wouldn’t have known that the “July” winners, Sea Cottage and Naval Estcourt, were lurking in the fifth generation.

As for Snooty Lady, though her mum could run a bit, she was shockingly engineered “up front”; “Snooty” herself was a winner of one (a modest Wednesday maiden on a wet day in a Western Cape winter) and there was no Angus, Dignify or Distinguished to speak of among her siblings. But she was a daughter, by now, of Northern Guest.

Were it not for the recommendation of Charles Laird (whose judgement in these matters has always mattered,) Cousin Linda may have gone elsewhere. Which, given a grand total in progeny sales of R4,305,000, would’ve been a helluva pity, as we would’ve been owing Standard Bank that much more these days!

The other highlight of the week, was a topic we alluded to on Tuesday under the heading “Sssh… Silence Please”, where in passing, we made mention of the Northern Hemisphere’s leading sires and Group winners in 2013, and the enormous impact sons of Sunday Silence were having on racing, not only in his native Japan, but wherever they’re found in major racing countries across the globe. Destined to take his second Japanese Sire’s title in a few weeks’ time, with his first runners only now approaching the end of their four-year-old careers, Deep Impact (by Sunday Silence) was a Japanese Triple Crown winner (including their St Leger over 1 7/8 miles), who went on to Group One success at two miles. He joins Galileo (the world’s leading stallion measured by Group winners again this year), the American-based Kitten’s Joy, the German stallion Monsun and the much-missed Montjeu (all winners over a mile and a half and/or beyond) among the planet’s most celebrated sires in this department this year.

I should add that while our regular attempts at inducing breeders to respect their credentials and make use of the likes of Golden Sword, Admire Main and Await The Dawn on our own roster, were partly aimed at overcoming the commonly-held prejudice against 2400m horses as well as enhancing their commercial prospects, this evidence should serve once-and-for-all, to dismiss a three-decades notion that to breed a good horse, the best resort is to seek out the sexiest sprinter/milers; the truth, as the facts now attest, is that “class” is the only measure this game really respects, whatever the propaganda may say or the salesring may pretend.

The moral of the story? Don’t be afraid in your selections, to use old mares, do not fear the non-winners or the one-time maidens in your broodmare band, and above all, have the courage of your instincts to patronise the classic racehorse in your stallion choice, as long as he was a good one and found a “gear” at the right time in a race.

Summerhill Stud Logo
Summerhill Stud Logo

Enquiries :

Linda Norval +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email linda@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

Comment