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ON TOP OF THE WORLD

Anyone who knows the name “Morkel” in South Africa associates it with either rugby or furniture, but for now we’ll confine ourselves to the rugby pitch. There’ve been fifteen rugby Springboks with that surname, one for every position on the field, more numerous than any other in the annals of South African rugby football. While it’s a bit of a long shot, because she married into the family, the name Heather Rosemary Morkel, is of the “household” variety at Summerhill.

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BIG DAYS AND BIG DREAMS

Summerhill Stud is a hive of activity at this time of the year, as we count down to the Big Days ahead. The School of Excellence Students managed to take some time out of their busy schedule, and enjoyed a fantastic outing on Thursday. They were lucky enough to attend the July Gallops at Greyville, which is a traditional and very popular feature of the Vodacom Durban July.

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THE 4 C'S OF THE ASIAN RACING CONFERENCE

Globalisation and innovative technology have closed the gap of global boundaries, thus making the business environment more dynamic. At the 35th Asian Horseracing Conference (ARC) held in Hong Kong in May 2014, the fundamental question asked was: How do organisations achieve and sustain long-term survival in a competitive and multifaceted environment?

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BRIGHT MINDS... BRIGHT FUTURE

We recently caught up with Pat Cummings, a name regular readers may recall from his presentation at the 2013 Winter Workshop (held at the School of Equine Management Excellence).

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HONG KONG AND HAPPENING

A few days before international scholarship recipient Hazel Kayiya departed the sunny shores of South Africa for Hong Kong’s bright lights, she popped in to bid farewell to her Summerhill family. This is what she had to say:

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OPPORTUNITY... OPPORTUNITY... OPPORTUNITY

School Of Management Excellence
School Of Management Excellence

School Of Management Excellence Theatre

(Photo : Summerhill Archives)

THE GAP IS CLOSING… NUMBERS ARE LIMITED

The world is a very competitive place; it’s never been more so.

Education is the key.

The School of Equine Management Excellence, with the support of CATHSSETA,

the Cape Breeders Club, Team Valor, N3TC and breeders from all around South Africa,

are offering scholarships to deserving candidates.

School of Equine Management Excellence

Summerhill Stud, South Africa

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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CHRISTMAS HAS COME EARLY. APRIL IS THE MONTH OF HAND-OUTS.

school of management excellence
school of management excellence

School of Equine Management Excellence - Class of 2013

(Photo : Heather Morkel)

IF A MAN CAN DO IT WELL, LET HIM DO IT - ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Our School Of Management Excellence has seven scholarships to give away, covering tuition, accommodation and costs of equipment. Our graduates have an eviable record locally and especially abroad, including Top Student at the English National Stud. Half (5) of the Class of 2013 received international scholarships for work experiences abroad.

Applications now open.

School of Equine Management Excellence

Summerhill Stud, South Africa

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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EDUCATION IS OUR PASSPORT TO THE FUTURE...

School of Equine Management Excellence - Class of 2012
School of Equine Management Excellence - Class of 2012

School of Equine Management Excellence - Class of 2012

(Photo : Leigh Willson)

…TOMORROW BELONGS TO THOSE WHO PLAN FOR IT.

THE ESTABLISHMENT

The School of Equine Management Excellence is the finest in the Southern Hemisphere.

THE TRACK RECORD

26 graduates and 8 international scholarships awarded in the first 3 years.

LEVELLING THE PLAYING FIELDS

Talent is plentiful : opportunities are not.

Applications (including 8 scholarships) now open.

*Course begins 5 May 2014

School of Equine Management Excellence

Summerhill Stud, South Africa

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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"DARE TO DREAM"

hazel kayiya
hazel kayiya

Hazel Kayiya / School Of Management Excellence (p)

Extract from a letter from Hazel Kayiya,

School of Equine Management Excellence graduate, to Mick Goss

“I look back with fond memories over the 5 months I spent with the Summerhill family and it always brings tears to my eyes. It was a life changing experience, which continues to mould me to dare to dream, to do better, and be better. Thank you for your support, admiration and above all your strength. Summerhill and the School is my rock.

You posed the question “How do we get the youth to participate in the horseracing industry” at the Winter School 2013. Since then, I have been thinking how best to answer your question in such a way that would bring tangible positive results to the industry. As a result, I have decided to embark on doing study concerning the challenges surrounding the Horse Racing Industry, the impact on growth and sustainability. I am of the opinion once we drill down to the problems we will make better informed strategic decisions to address them.

In January of this year I registered with the Graduate School of Business and Leadership (UKZN) to do research on the Sustainability of the Horse Racing Industry in South Africa. The study will entail exploring the challenges faced by the Horse Racing industry and I hope to address your question during this process. The internship at the Hong Kong Jockey Club could not have come at a better time, it will provide me to with the opportunity to study from one of the racing models that’s considered to be the best currently.

I am also hoping that my study will be a foundation for my PHD, which I hope to commence next year; it will based on the application of Systems Dynamics in creating a strategic model that will have a positive impact on the sustainability of the industry. I am passionate about the Horseracing Industry and I am committed to its growth.

“Dare to Dream” looking forward to this exciting year filled with adventure, hard work and strengthening relationships.”

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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HOME-GROWN HEROES

SCHOOL OF EQUINE MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE

Summerhill Stud, South Africa

heather morkel
heather morkel

Heather MorkelOver the past few years, a seemingly conventional set of circumstances have ignited some life-changing events among a deserving group of young people: a Thoroughbred breeder and farmer has a dream and builds a new adult educational facility, based on the farm in Mooi River. Good men and women from across the world visit, donating their time, expertise, wisdom and, of course, the old world-turner, money, in the form of scholarships. And our heroes and heroines emerge from the ranks of South African horsemen and women.

In the hurly burly of life we often overlook the transformation of the ordinary becoming the extraordinary.

Top students and Childwick Trust Scholarship recipients of 2013-14, John Motaung and Megan Trott, departed for Britain’s National Stud on Saturday, courtesy of a generous double scholarship from Trustees Anthony Cane, John Wood and Karen Groom. Like Thabani Nzimande, top student, scholarship recipient and Best Practical Student in the UK in 2011, John began his career at Summerhill as a stable cleaner and groom. His ability to nurture and guide young equine athletes through handling and his natural talent as a workrider, saw him move through the ranks within Tarryn Liebenberg and Michael Booysen’s competitive Pre-Training and Sales division at Summerhill - John pre-trained Vodacom Durban July and J&B Met winner IGUGU. Recognition for his talent and dedication followed, and he was awarded two scholarships through Summerhill’s pioneering international internship programme, where among others he worked for renowned pinhooker and bloodstock agent, Becky Thomas in Florida, USA. As Strings Manager here at Summerhill, the division was hard-pressed to send John “back to school” last year, but the rewards have been immeasurable.

Megan Trott (so apt a surname for her chosen career!) has dreamt about working with horses all her young life, and as her family could not afford tertiary education to facilitate her ambitions, she has spent the last three years working seasonally as “prep cook” at the Boca West Country Club in Florida, saving every dollar for her goal of attending the School of Equine Management Excellence. She joined the Class of 2013 and simply excelled, impressing everyone with her work ethic and passion for all things equine.

It has been an extraordinary “third season” for the school, where scholarship funders CATHSSETA, Childwick Trust, Gold Circle, Investec, Cape Thoroughbred Breeders and sponsors N3TC made the awarding of 5 international scholarships (half the class), possible this year.

Our best wishes to John and Megan, who have crossed continents in the name of horses, and a successful National Stud Diploma course in 2014.

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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BIRTHDAYS, BURIALS AND BLOW-ME-DOWNS

Mick Goss
Mick Goss

Mick Goss / Summerhill CEO

“Horses and humans both eat on Good Friday, Christmas Day and every other public holiday we know, more so in December, so we’re heads down here.”

December has always been an eventful month for the Goss family. My late Dad and younger brother were both Sagittarians, and so am I. Nelson Mandela touched us all with his burial last month, and Boxing Day marked the anniversary of the respects we paid to Cheryl’s Mum the year before. For most people I know, it’s a “down tools” month, but if your chosen profession is horses and hospitality, that’s a pipedream. Horses and humans both eat on Good Friday, Christmas Day and every other public holiday we know, more so in December, so we’re heads down here. Not that we’re complaining at all; Summerhill and Hartford seem to have a disarming effect on the grumpiest of politicians, banged-up bankers and stressed-out solicitors, and often enough, the soothing balm of a stud tour turns an unsuspecting hotel guest into a paying customer on the farm. It all helps the bottom line!

But of course, the memories of those that’ve passed on, inevitably induce some reflection. My old man was a trader by birth, an accountant by profession and a horseman at heart. Some of these things are mutually exclusive, if only because accountants generally think they have a handle on the economics of the horse game, and so you seldom find them among the “players”. But there’s another aspect to their in-built aversion to getting their feet wet, and that’s because accountants like to bring order and logic to their lives; horse racing is seldom ordered and is never logical. It’s an affair of the heart, and it appeals more to the adventurous among us, to beings of the creative spirit who believes you only live once, and to those with an appreciation of the higher things in life.

In that respect, my father was an unusual accountant: he loved the ponies, and so did his dad, Pat Goss, who chose the thick of the Great Depression to launch his stud farming ventures in faraway East Griqualand. “One horse is all it takes” Pat would confide to anyone who’d listen, and when his moment of glory came before the 100,000 who’d thronged the fastness of Greyville racecourse on the first Saturday of July 1946, there were more than a few in the crowd who took heart in the memory of that one-liner. I have to confess, that while my time only came later, the recollections of what St Pauls did that day, and what my granddad had often professed was as much a contributor to the existence of Summerhill as we know it today, as any others beyond the genetic predisposition towards horses that appears to infect the male line descendants of our family. We simply haven’t been able to find the antidote!

Most of us grow up wanting to please the “ancestors”, not only because in Zululand it’s a fundamental aspect of local religion, but I guess it’s because they all seem to harbour so many expectations of us. My Dad liked the idea that in my first life, I’d chosen the law as a means to a living, but I’ve often wondered what he’d have thought of my abandoning it for a stud farm. After all, this is not so much a way of making a living as it is a way of life, and I’ve often pulled the leg of my brother, Pat Jnr, that when I bought him out of Summerhill in the 1980s, I gave him his passport to the Sunday Times “Rich List”, while here I am still wearing the shoes I first arrived in!

Pat Snr and my Dad were both winners, and I suspect they would’ve applauded our nine consecutive Breeder’s Premierships, knowing the odds-against when you’re as remote from the mainstream as we are, and that it’s happened at a time when the contest has never been tougher. At the same time, as former champions themselves of the lot of the little guys, they would’ve lamented the demise among our colleagues of so many of the farming fraternity who’ve withered in the face of  a wave of involvement from the “big money” in town. Yet horse breeding is not alone in this respect; agriculture in general as well as the dairy, plantations and crop farming sectors, have seen similar patterns gain traction in recent times.

Herein may lie opportunities for the former farmers to become the highly-rewarded managers in the new corporate scheme of things, free of the hazards that world prices, weak currencies and wet Wednesdays in the Western Cape winter might have held for their one-time enterprises. Pat and Dad would, I’m sure, have liked the idea of hosting the only world class hotel on a world class stud farm in the world, as well as its recent recognition by a senior critic of no less a publication than The Wall Street Journal, as one of the top three country restaurants on the planet.

As former studmen whose covering yards were gum-poled palisades out in the open, they’d have envied the shelter of the stallion barn, the countenance of which resembles the Moeder Kerk in Graaff Reinet’s main square. As a man who’d spent the entire proceeds of his “July” victory on a stallion son of Hyperion, granddad would’ve taken pride in the assembly of princely pedigrees and pulsating performances that populate the stallion precinct. They’d have applauded a team that replaced the arduous torture of yearling “prep” with the first automated “walker”, which does the work of ten men; and of the innovation which took the guesswork out of early pregnancy diagnosis with the nation’s first ultrasound scanner: which worked with the treasury to rewrite the most favourable tax dispensation in the world of racehorse production; that had the foresight to persuade our local custodians of the benefits of a breeder’s Premium Scheme which remains unique to those who ply their trade in these valleys: a team which gave fresh impetus to racehorse marketing through the engineering of the world’s first Ready To Run Sale almost 30 years ago, a concept which maintains its place as the world’s fastest growing tool in the turnover of horseflesh: that understood the imperatives of the trade in horses, and presided over the establishment of a national Trade Council which has overseen the export of more than a billion in bloodstock.

They’d have been in awe of a blog site which attracts the busiest traffic in thoroughbred breeding across the globe; and I’m sure they’d have marvelled at a farm just 10 kilometres outside the dustiest little dorp in the Midlands, (at the Southernmost tip of what the civilized people call the “Darkest Continent”,) whose “resident” customers stretch across 22 timezones, from Japan to the United States. They’d have been especially appreciative of the Southern Hemisphere’s only School of Management Excellence, whose governors count a former Judge of high repute and an eminent ex-chair of the Jockey Club of South Africa; of the fact that eight professors, local and foreign have given their time to teach our students in a theatre dedicated to their memory; and that our graduates have excelled in the company of representatives of all the major racing jurisdictions of the world.

Born where they were and raised the way they were, they’d have rejoiced in the skills of our people, in the presence of our other institutions of learning and especially, they’d have been comforted by the harmony that exists between the six hundred who call Summerhill “home” every night.

I’ve no doubt, they’d have delighted in my Mum’s and my brother’s unstinting commitment to our enterprise, and that in the celebration of her life, no fewer than two Kings and a Queen turned up to remember the “old girl”.

Finally, for a man like my Dad who belonged to another century but who loved “gadgets” nonetheless, I’m reminded every day as I enter the main gates of Summerhill, how tickled he’d have been at their mechanical activation. For all our Sunday school lessons, it remains a truism: the Devil is in the detail.

Summerhill Stud Logo
Summerhill Stud Logo

Enquiries :

Linda Norval +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email linda@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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"V" FOR VICTORY

School Of Management Excellence Graduates
School Of Management Excellence Graduates

Graduates of the School of Management Excellence

(Photo : Leigh Willson)

SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE

Summerhill Stud, South Africa

mick goss
mick goss

Mick Goss

Summerhill CEOWhen we first published our plans for our School of Management Excellence, there were more than a few who dubbed it an outrageous extravagance for a Zulu farm. They may have been right; we must confess to a few doubting moments ourselves, but when we realised what it could mean not only for the upliftment of our own people, but for the nation as a whole, we had no choice. The idea was born of a conviction that this country is home to some of the world’s best stockmen, that given a chance, a school like this could be a game-changer. It has been. We were convinced too, that worldwide, our sport was lamentably under-served in its learning institutions. If this was the price of education in a game that had done us well, we were willing to pay it. Some may feel that they have plenty to lose in defeat but whatever Summerhill had, we were ready to give up for victory. Done properly, the dreams would accrue. They have.

The Heritage Day long weekend seemed an appropriate occasion for Heather Morkel to convene the graduation ceremony for the class of 2013. Attendees flew in from the four corners of the land, the students delivered their final presentations, and the judges, literally, got down to work. We’ve always said we’ve been lucky in our lives at Summerhill, and one of the relationships we pride most, is with the people who serve as our school governors. Alan Magid was as distinguished a member of the South African judiciary as recent history has known; Ronnie Napier, an exalted member of the Johannesburg legal fraternity, is a past chairman of the National Horse Racing Authority. Ronnie’s career in horse racing includes the breeding of J&B Met hero, Charles Fortune, and two Northern Guest standouts: S.A. champion stayer Travel North, and the Fillies Guineas heroine Dance Every Dance. More recently he was co-owner of the champion three year old miler, Imbongi and the Fillies Guineas ace, Fisani. Judge Magid, on the other hand, found himself on the inside of the Gold Cup winner’s circle with Icona, but what surprised me most as a young solicitor back in the 80s, was his knowledge of breeding. When in his days as an advocate, I handed him a brief involving a dispute over the ownership of a stallion prospect, he immediately recited the horse’s full lineage. Remembering that this was long before the age of the internet, I quickly realised this was a man I could do business with!

Though schools of our kind are hardly profit-making ventures, particularly when their raison de’etre is the upliftment of people, budgets are inevitably pitched at trying to break even, and even that is difficult. Without sponsors, we could never have been where we are today, and the first to put up their hands three years ago was Investec Private Bank. Quick on their heels, came Con Roux of NTC3, who manage our local toll concession, and who have more than 70 projects on the go between here and Johannesburg. Out of the blue, towards the end of last year, came a fairy godmother in the form of the national Cathsseta (which falls under the portfolio of Dr Blade Nzimande’s Ministry of Higher Education). On Monday evening, Leonard Strong delivered a stirring speech on their behalf on their reasons for supporting us, and why they felt this course was so worthwhile. Besides the seven scholarships they provided last year, they have also assisted in funding an overseas work experience for one of last year’s deserving graduates, Maine Chance’s Marius Losch, to New Zealand. 

It seems that Heather’s work at the school and the marvellous outcomes we’ve witnessed since the first graduates were capped, have captured the attentions of a fairly broad audience. It’s comforting to know that there are people in this world who understand that talent and intelligence are spread evenly, but that opportunity is not. They also have social consciences, and they know that without funds, it’s difficult to achieve much in a costly world. There’ve been some inspiring stories at our School of Excellence, the one most-told, being Thabani Nzimande’s “Best Practical Student” award at the English National Stud, which would not have been possible of it were not for the generosity of the trustees who run the Childwick Trust, founded by the late Jim Joel, benefactor, horseman and nephew of diamond king, Barney Barnato. Trustees, Anthony Cane and John Wood first came to Hartford by dint of coincidence, and as it turned out, Anthony is chairman of one of the world’s most famous racecourses, Epsom.

Though the main thrust of the Childwick Trust’s work in South Africa involves disadvantaged children under the age of 5, these gentlemen immediately saw the value of what was happening at our school, and they endowed us with an annual scholarship for a deserving student to the English National Stud, the most venerable of these institutions and the oldest worldwide.

We had a dilemma this year, arising from the anticipation that there would be almost nothing separating the top two or three students, and the Childwick Trust have more than come to the party. They have made two scholarships available for 2014, and that made the judges’ task that bit easier: John Motaung (a previous recipient of a Summerhill scholarship to Becky Thomas’ academy in the United States) and Megan Trott have big boots to fill, but they were both more than deserving awardees, and they won’t let the standards this school has set, down.

The other thing which has made a material difference was the attendance by Muzi Mwandla and Leonard Strong of the Cathsseta, who brought not only the power of government funding to the table, but also a good stretch of imagination. With their help, a further three international scholarships were awarded (that means five, or 50% of the total enrolment this year) will be going abroad on post-graduate work experiences, and if ever there was an incentive to attend the school, it lies here. For the record; these are the details:

Name

Farm/Funding

Award

Destination

John Motaung

Summerhill Stud / CATHSSETA

Childwick Trust Scholarship – joint Top Student

British National Stud, United Kingdom

Megan Trott

Self-funded

Childwick Trust Scholarship – joint Top Student

British National Stud, United Kingdom

Willem Arries

Cheveley Stud / Cape Breeders & Investec Funding

Best Practical Student – CATHSSETA International Internship/Scholarship

Ireland / United States

Hazel Kayiya

Gold Circle

Team Player of the Year and CATHSSETA International Internship

Racing Operations - Hong Kong

Tshepiso Matsoele

CATHSSETA

CATHSSETA International Internship/Scholarship

United States

And finally, Summerhill awarded three internships for the immediate practical period to Kabelo Nkoane, Tshepiso Matsoele and Megan Trott.

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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SCHOOL OF EQUINE MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE

School Of Equine Management Excellence
School Of Equine Management Excellence

Click above to watch the School of Equine Management Excellence insert

(A Jimmy Lithgow Production)

SCHOOL OF EQUINE MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE

Summerhill Stud, South Africa

A Jimmy Lithgow Production

Jimmy Lithgow’s insert on the

School of Equine Management Excellence

at Summerhill Stud.

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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CHAMPIONS OF TOMORROW

Hazel Kayiya
Hazel Kayiya

Hazel Kayiya - School of Excellence

(Photo : Supplied)

“…this is the time to reignite that passion that led you to the horse.”

There is nothing graceful about jumping onto a tractor, let alone a slippery one, and at 7am for that matter. After the first couple of times the eagerness of being on the back of the tractor falls away, the Vuma feed bags seem to be heavier with each load. This is not how I pictured my first day in the Mares and Foals division. I was so excited that I got to bed pretty early the night before in the hopes tomorrow would arrive sooner. Unfortunately, Murphy just had to mess with me - I was up at 3am and time seemed to have gone on a go-slow as I waited for dawn.

The Mare and Foal team redeemed themselves by moving me from feeding to the foal division after lunch. I have been told to wait for the time I get to foal one of my own, but it will always be the moment I first held a foal I’ll remember, how soft they feel and their fragility. The innocence in their eyes, before they discover vices such as rearing and bucking or even biting, but having a kick that will make every father proud and the mothers wishing they could bubble wrap them. This is what it’s all about, our future champions in the making. I don’t think a play of words can ever articulate how I felt the first time I held a foal. I am sure there will be other ‘firsts’ that will come and go, things that will make me cry and smile, but nothing will ever impact on my life the way holding that foal did, for the first time. At that very moment, one thing was certain, as sure as death and taxes are, I know I am in this for life.

The breeding season is a time for new beginnings, but also a time to reflect on what made us fall in love with these beauties. Is it their eyes or their graceful walk, is it their serenity or their acceptance of who we are? Is it that in them, you see your dreams coming true? Some play the lotto, others like to take a chance with the horses, but whatever it is, this is the time to reignite that passion that led you to the horse. As for me, what got me in, was the speed, but what keeps me here, is the reverie that a champion has passed through my hands. I can’t wait for the day these majestic creatures grace us with their presence at Gold Circle, the home of Champion’s Season, but until then, here is to an amazing 2013 breeding season, may they enjoy their stay at the Home of Legends, 9-time Champion Breeder, Summerhill Stud.

Hazel Kayiya

School of Excellence

Class of 2013

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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RAISED FOR THE HOME TURN. PROVEN ABROAD.

Thabani Nzimande - National Stud Best Practical Student 2012
Thabani Nzimande - National Stud Best Practical Student 2012

Thabani Nzimande - National Stud Best Practical Student 2012

(Photo : Summerhill Stud)

“Excerpt from the forthcoming Summerhill Sires brochure.

Let us know if you’d like to be added to the mailing list.”

On the face of it, an institution of the magnitude of our School of Management Excellence, is an outrageous extravagance for a Zulu farm. But it was born of a conviction that this country is home to some of the world’s best stockmen, that given the chance, this could be a game-changer. It has been. We were convinced, too, that our sport was lamentably under-served in its learning institutions, and that if this was the price of education in a game that had done us well, we were willing to pay it. Some may feel they have plenty to lose in defeat, but whatever Summerhill had, we we’re ready to give up for victory. Done properly, the dreams would accrue. They have.

Talent and intelligence are spread evenly across the planet; opportunity is not. This school was a chance for students to dream, and already we’ve seen some budding Moses Thembes, Patrice Motsepes, Gaynor Ruperts and Mary Slacks, who see the world not for what it is, but for what it can become.

Our students know that the world is already very different from the one they were born into, and that next year’s, no, next month’s world, will be different again. They know too, that the commercial world has become the preserve of “big business”, sometimes sleepy places dominated by actuaries and accountants nursing warm gins and tonic. To make it these days, you need to be smarter than your lunch, otherwise you are the lunch.

They’ve also learnt that there’s a great big world out there, brimming with opportunity, and that they shouldn’t let their schooling interfere too much with their education. Besides, they understand that there is a danger to victory. Being gracious in defeat, as in victory, is not a characteristic that defines the modern sports era. What happened to being a good sport?

Already you can see them listening for the hoofbeats, yet none of them is running with the herd. So you can be sure that when the historians of the twenty-first century call out the heroes of our game, there’ll be a good number of our “dreamers” among them.

Thabani Nzimande, first recipient of the Childwick Trust’s scholarship to the English National Stud, was “Top Practical Student” at the English National Stud in 2012.

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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PATRICK CUMMINGS ON TECHNOLOGY IN HORSERACING

Patrick Cummings - Trakus
Patrick Cummings - Trakus

Click above to watch interview with Patrick Cummings at the Investec Stallion Day… starts at 6:42 after Vodacom Durban July Insert

(Image and Footage : Andrew Bon)

WINTER WORKSHOP

School Of Management Excellence

Summerhill Stud, South Africa

One of horseracing’s biggest challenges is to attract new fans and one way is through technology, according to Boston-based Patrick Cummings writes Nicci Garner for Tab News. Cummings gave an absorbing talk at the School Of Management Excellence’s Winter Workshop at Summerhill Stud in Mooi River on Monday.

Cummings is a horseracing expert, who has covered the Dubai World Cup Carnival since 2007 on his popular website Dubai Race Night and is also Director of Racing Information for Trakus, which provides full-field in-race tracking and real-time information to racetrack operators worldwide.

Cummings believes that, although horseracing is one of the most visually appealing sports, it battles to attract new fans because it is so difficult to differentiate one horse from another during a race. High-definition broadcasts are helpful, but the Trakus technology is better, according to Cummings because “a commentator can only call one horse at a time”.

Trakus uses a wireless radio frequency system with small radio antennas positioned around the racetrack. Small tags are placed into saddlecloths and data about a horse’s location is broadcast numerous times a second. South African punters will be familiar with the Trakus system through watching horseracing in Dubai and Singapore, where dynamic leaderboards relay the position of a horse while a race is being run.

Even more data is captured through the system, like individual sectional times, distance covered per segment, the horse’s distance from the rail, cumulative times and peak speeds.

“Racing is an extremely data-rich sport, but until now so much of the game is learned and instinctual and not factual,” said Cummings, giving examples of how wrong perceptions can be.

Cummings is currently in South Africa as a guest of champion trainer Mike de Kock.

Summerhill Stud holds it School of Management Excellence Winter Workshop annually and experts in various fields give talks on their field of expertise. Other international keynote speakers at Day 1 of the two-day workshop were Tom Magnier from Coolmore Australia and Chauncey Morris, the CEO of Thoroughbred Breeders Australia. Interesting talks by Investec Strategist and Economist Prof Brian Kantor, Michael Vincent, director of Strategy and Innovation Deloitte Consulting, well-known racing and sports commentator Neil Andrews and bloodstock expert Jehan Malherbe were also enjoyed by the 100-plus people who enrolled at the Winter Workshop.

Extract from Tab Online

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THE WINTER WORKSHOP 2013

School Of Management Excellence
School Of Management Excellence

School Of Management Excellence, Summerhill Stud

(Photo : Summerhill Archives)

WINTER WORKSHOP

School Of Management Excellence

8-9 July 2013

Write this down. Monday 8th and Tuesday 9th July.

Our annual Winter Workshop features some of the world’s top presenters on breeding, racing, politics and economics, including Tom Magnier of Coolmore Australia, Chauncey Morris of Aushorse, Patrick Cummings, Neil Andrews, Mary Metcalf, Mike Vincent

and many other well-known names.

Click here for the full programme.

BOOK EARLY: THE THEATRE WILL BE JAMMED TO CAPACITY.

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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TOM MAGNIER : A HORSEMAN AT HEART

Tom-Magnier-and-Surrealist.jpg

Tom Magnier with Surrealist

(Photo : The Land)

WINTER WORKSHOP

School Of Management Excellence

8 - 9 July 2013

He is the son of arguably the world’s most powerful Thoroughbred identity, Coolmore principal John Magnier, but Tom Magnier, who prefers to stay firmly out of the limelight, is also every inch a farmer, writes Bronwyn Farr.

The owners of a dairy that neighbours the immaculate Southern Hemisphere arm of Coolmore, a 3642-hectare pocket of rich alluvial country at Jerrys Plains in the Hunter Valley, were surprised recently when a young man with an Irish accent popped by to tell them he’d seen a cow having trouble calving, and after assisting, had moved her into one of their sheds. Later, they learned it was none other than Tom Magnier.

On an impromptu tour of Coolmore, framed by the imposing Wollemi Ranges, Tom is as delighted as any other farmer about recent rain. His public profile, at least in Thoroughbred circles, has increased considerably in recent years, as he has set about purchasing superlative mares such as 2012 Magic Millions broodmare sale headline act Melito, a $1,650,000 buy, and at the same sale a few years earlier, Surrealist (pictured with Tom), for $1.6 million, and Gypsy Dancer, for $1.5 million.

But Tom has been determined to maintain a low-key presence at Coolmore Australia, quietly working in the background, undertaking hands-on stints in various roles on the farm. “I came down for three months in 2000, just before the Sydney Olympics, and my father encouraged me to make Australia home. He believes very strongly the future is here, in Australia, so I worked with yearlings, mares, stallions, basically,” Tom said.

In 1971, aged 23, John Magnier, along with his future father-in-law, the legendary Irish trainer Vincent O’Brien, and the visionary Robert Sangster, pioneered and established the business of global stallions. The trio raided Keeneland Yearling Sales with impunity in the early 1970s. The results from those sale-ring sorties turned the Thoroughbred world on its head as they essentially brought Irish blood back from Kentucky to Ireland: early purchases included yearlings that turned out to be Epsom Derby winners The Minstrel and Golden Fleece, French Derby winner Caerleon and Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe winner Alleged.

Within little more than two decades, Coolmore grew from a 160ha plot in Tipperary to an international operation of unparalleled success, with holdings in Ireland, Kentucky, and the Hunter Valley, and more than 50 stallions. Vincent O’Brien, Tom Magnier’s grandfather, was voted the greatest racing figure of the turf by the British racing public in 2003. He died, aged 92, in Ireland in 2009.

Tom’s love of riding was encouraged by his mother Susan, Vincent’s daughter. Such is her eye for horses, she purchased Moonfleet - a horse Tom described as a failed National Hunt horse - as a four-year-old at Tattersalls in 1995. Moonfleet famously went on to win the world’s most coveted eventing prize, with Australian Olympic gold medallist Andrew Hoy, winning Badminton in May 2006.

Tom and his four siblings rode at every possible opportunity and he evented successfully for Ireland. “Every spare moment we had, we were out schooling our horses. My mother is very keen on eventing,” he said. Tom never considered a career that did not involve horses. “We talked horses at breakfast, lunch and dinner. I would not have been any good at anything else,” he said. It is said Vincent O’Brien could “look into the soul of a horse” and Tom seems to have the same quiet, gentle approach, to horses and to people. “A lot of the guys here at Coolmore will tell you that when they were showing horses at the farm for Vincent years ago, Vincent would carry around one of those wooden chairs with a silver handle, and he would sit on it and observe the horse for ages,” Tom said. “If he came back for a third look at the horses he liked, he might look at the horse outside the stable for 20 minutes and then go inside the stable for 20 minutes and just be on his own with the horse and really see what this horse was.”

One such horse was the elegant bay Royal Academy - grandsire of Black Caviar - who died at Jerrys Plains in February this year. “His influence on racing here is enormous and will live on - he is probably one of the best examples of how shuttling stallions has worked.” Tom said Royal Academy’s Breeder’s Cup win in 1990 was his all-time favourite race. Royal Academy was a $US3.5 million yearling destined to join a roster of 36 sires at that time. Then eight-years-old, Tom vividly remembers watching the race with family on television at home in Ireland, knowing the entire country was cheering the horse home.

Vincent O’Brien had staked his reputation on the colt, and Royal Academy duly gave Ireland its first Breeders’ Cup victory. Glamorous Royal Academy captured everybody’s imagination winning the Irish 2000 Guineas and July Cup before being set for the Breeders’ Cup. “It was an incredible time,” recalled Tom. “My grandfather persuaded (champion jockey) Lester (Piggott) to come out of retirement to ride the horse. Vincent sent Lester to The Curragh and said ‘see how you get on today’ and The Curragh got a record crowd. Vincent offered him four rides and he rode four winners, and I think that proved to Vincent he could do it, so off they went to the Breeders’ Cup.”

“From a young age, it is the one race that sticks out my head. If anybody ever asks me, ‘what is a great race?’ that’s the first video I would put on to show them - I think Lester gave him the most unbelievable ride, while Royal Academy showed what a great racehorse he was and he beat a hell of a field. The atmosphere at that time was unbelievable - there was a lot of excitement, the stallions (Lomond, Caerleon, Sadler’s Wells, Last Tycoon, Storm Bird, El Gran Senor among them) were getting a lot of very good mares and the horses they were throwing were very good looking, and then they went on and did the job on the racetrack,” he recalled.

The tide is turning, and this spring Coolmore has a relatively fresh, young roster - Danehill stallion Fastnet Rock’s success is such that his fee is $275,000, although his fourth crop are only two-year-olds. Coolmore is synonymous with global supersire Danehill, who died prematurely in 2003, and seven of 15 sires on the roster are either by Danehill or have Danehill as their grand-sire. Tom thinks other racing jurisdictions would do well to take notice of Australia’s vibrant racing scene, apart from comparatively lucrative purses and bonuses, he notes the emphasis is hip, young, and innovative.

“Australian racing really caters for young people; it’s modern, it’s a fun place to be,” he said. Asked what he thinks are the most important sire-making races on both sides of the equator, Tom pointed to the fact Classic winners were prized in Europe while Australia was obsessed with two-year-old speed. He believes the Lightning Stakes (1000m) at Flemington is a benchmark race; Black Caviar has snared the last two editions of the Group One feature, but it has been a launching pad for stallion success with Lightning winners including Choisir and Fastnet Rock now domiciled in Coolmore’s stallion barn.

As well as being the biggest consignor of yearlings in the Southern Hemisphere, Coolmore is a major purchaser of yearlings - often horses the team thinks could be stallion prospects - as well as mares. Tom has the responsibility of managing an expansive portfolio of expensive bloodstock, and a notebook on his desk contains detailed information on the progress of Coolmore-owned racehorses. It is a rather impressive office. “Yes,” he agreed, slightly embarrassed. “In fact, it is Dad’s, and if he comes down then I will have to move out of it.”

Editor’s Note: Tom Magnier is a keynote speaker at this year’s Winter Workshop in our School Of Excellence on Monday, 8th and Tuesday 9th July. He is part of an array of stellar personalities in the line-up, and will speak on the Coolmore Story, “one of racing’s most memorable tales. For more details click here or contact Heather Morkel on 033 263 1081.

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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IN PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE

School Of Management Excellence
School Of Management Excellence

School Of Management Excellence Theatre

(Photo : Summerhill Archives)

SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT EXCELLENCE

Summerhill Stud, South Africa

Below is an extract from a letter written by Hazel Kayiya, a qualified chartered accountant who works in the forensic audit department at Gold Circle. Hazel has been identified as a young, up-and-coming talent by Gold Circle who have awarded her a scholarship to the School of Management Excellence. She is attending the course to broaden her knowledge of the racing and breeding industries in general.

“After reading the article below, I realised that I want to be part of the School of Excellence with no doubt or reservations. The article says ‘which you pursue is what you value’. I value knowledge, I value the thoughts and opinions of others. I want to be part of the change that happens at Gold Circle.

So instead of succumbing to the death of comfort zone, I should rather brave the cold, pull up the thermal underwear and step out and experience something different. At the end of it all. I want to walk out there with a new perspective that will challenge and test me. To ‘pursue excellence’, of elegance, of truth, of what’s next, of what if, of change, of value, of results, of relationships, of service, of knowledge” that will enable me to add more value to the department and the company.

2013 pulled out a wild card in my bag of dreams, thank you for extending this opportunity to me to be part of the Summerhill magic.”

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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Jim Joel : A Rich Legacy

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Jim Joel : A Rich Legacy

If there is more than one man who’s owned both a Derby and a Grand National winner, we don’t know him. What we do know though, is that Jim Joel did. We’ll come to the horses that made it happen, but first about his legacy.

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