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Winter Workshop

Winter Workshop 2016

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Winter Workshop 2016

We are sad to report that with the considerable pressure on government finances for universities following the “Fees Must Fall” campaign, educational support for other institutions (all SETAS) including the CATHSSETA which has been a major provider of funds not only for our Winter Workshop, but principally for our annual scholarships, have fallen away.

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Slade, Silvano, Sophistication

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Slade, Silvano, Sophistication

John Slade was a speaker at the Summerhill Winter Workshop held at the stud farm's renowned School Of Excellence this week, a few days after Maine Chance likely achieved a world first by breeding the one-two-three of the country's premier race, the Vodacom Durban July.

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Summerhill's Winter Wonderland

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Summerhill's Winter Wonderland

One can see why Mick speaks so passionately about his farm when you wake up to the view of the Giant's Castle. If that and a Hartford breakfast aren't enough to chase you out of bed, then the prospect of the 2015 Stallion Day, and the 5th annual Winter Workshop was sure to do the trick.

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Speed Gene emPowers Buyer Kings

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Speed Gene emPowers Buyer Kings

One of the most fascinating lectures at the 2015 Winter Workshop was delivered by Ireland’s Dr Emmeline Hill, who is the co-founder and chairman of Equinome. This company was launched in the wake of the discovery of the “speed gene”.

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The Wonders of Widden

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The Wonders of Widden

"This is the story of a valley. It is a valley that has sometimes known flood and fire, but seldom famine. For it is a valley of lush, green springs and golden summers. Its sweet waters, its abundant pastures and sheltered timber are ringed about by steep ramparts. Winter cannot disturb its calm. One could search the world for such a place.

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Summerhill Stallion Day

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Summerhill Stallion Day

On Sunday, Summerhill held its 32nd annual Stallion Day at the School of Equine Management Excellence, and the occasion was dignified by the presence of heads of state, cabinet ministers, representatives of two royal families, close on 20 different countries and the usual multitude of guests.

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The Winter Workshop

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The Winter Workshop

Our annual Winter Workshop features some of the world's top presenters; legendary Australian breeder, Antony Thompson (Widden); racing raconteur, Neil Morrice; fabled story-teller Rob Caskie and ground-breaking film-maker and race horse owner, Anant Singh, to name a few.

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Day Of The Dead Moon Brings New Light

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Day Of The Dead Moon Brings New Light

With all the shenanigans going on in Parliament and the gravity of the stuff we see on CNN every day, there is relief in the passages of story-teller extraordinaire, David Rattray, whose accounts of the battles that wracked our region for most of the 19th century, are a magnet to thousands of international visitors to this day.

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BIG DAYS AND BIG DREAMS

Summerhill Stud is a hive of activity at this time of the year, as we count down to the Big Days ahead. The School of Excellence Students managed to take some time out of their busy schedule, and enjoyed a fantastic outing on Thursday. They were lucky enough to attend the July Gallops at Greyville, which is a traditional and very popular feature of the Vodacom Durban July.

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SAVE THE DATES

Monday 7th and Tuesday 8th July, Cathsseta and School of Equine Management Excellence Winter Workshop featuring some of the world’s top presenters on racing, breeding, leadership and the business environment.

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PATRICK CUMMINGS ON TECHNOLOGY IN HORSERACING

Patrick Cummings - Trakus
Patrick Cummings - Trakus

Click above to watch interview with Patrick Cummings at the Investec Stallion Day… starts at 6:42 after Vodacom Durban July Insert

(Image and Footage : Andrew Bon)

WINTER WORKSHOP

School Of Management Excellence

Summerhill Stud, South Africa

One of horseracing’s biggest challenges is to attract new fans and one way is through technology, according to Boston-based Patrick Cummings writes Nicci Garner for Tab News. Cummings gave an absorbing talk at the School Of Management Excellence’s Winter Workshop at Summerhill Stud in Mooi River on Monday.

Cummings is a horseracing expert, who has covered the Dubai World Cup Carnival since 2007 on his popular website Dubai Race Night and is also Director of Racing Information for Trakus, which provides full-field in-race tracking and real-time information to racetrack operators worldwide.

Cummings believes that, although horseracing is one of the most visually appealing sports, it battles to attract new fans because it is so difficult to differentiate one horse from another during a race. High-definition broadcasts are helpful, but the Trakus technology is better, according to Cummings because “a commentator can only call one horse at a time”.

Trakus uses a wireless radio frequency system with small radio antennas positioned around the racetrack. Small tags are placed into saddlecloths and data about a horse’s location is broadcast numerous times a second. South African punters will be familiar with the Trakus system through watching horseracing in Dubai and Singapore, where dynamic leaderboards relay the position of a horse while a race is being run.

Even more data is captured through the system, like individual sectional times, distance covered per segment, the horse’s distance from the rail, cumulative times and peak speeds.

“Racing is an extremely data-rich sport, but until now so much of the game is learned and instinctual and not factual,” said Cummings, giving examples of how wrong perceptions can be.

Cummings is currently in South Africa as a guest of champion trainer Mike de Kock.

Summerhill Stud holds it School of Management Excellence Winter Workshop annually and experts in various fields give talks on their field of expertise. Other international keynote speakers at Day 1 of the two-day workshop were Tom Magnier from Coolmore Australia and Chauncey Morris, the CEO of Thoroughbred Breeders Australia. Interesting talks by Investec Strategist and Economist Prof Brian Kantor, Michael Vincent, director of Strategy and Innovation Deloitte Consulting, well-known racing and sports commentator Neil Andrews and bloodstock expert Jehan Malherbe were also enjoyed by the 100-plus people who enrolled at the Winter Workshop.

Extract from Tab Online

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THE WINTER WORKSHOP 2013

School Of Management Excellence
School Of Management Excellence

School Of Management Excellence, Summerhill Stud

(Photo : Summerhill Archives)

WINTER WORKSHOP

School Of Management Excellence

8-9 July 2013

Write this down. Monday 8th and Tuesday 9th July.

Our annual Winter Workshop features some of the world’s top presenters on breeding, racing, politics and economics, including Tom Magnier of Coolmore Australia, Chauncey Morris of Aushorse, Patrick Cummings, Neil Andrews, Mary Metcalf, Mike Vincent

and many other well-known names.

Click here for the full programme.

BOOK EARLY: THE THEATRE WILL BE JAMMED TO CAPACITY.

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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TOM MAGNIER : A HORSEMAN AT HEART

Tom-Magnier-and-Surrealist.jpg

Tom Magnier with Surrealist

(Photo : The Land)

WINTER WORKSHOP

School Of Management Excellence

8 - 9 July 2013

He is the son of arguably the world’s most powerful Thoroughbred identity, Coolmore principal John Magnier, but Tom Magnier, who prefers to stay firmly out of the limelight, is also every inch a farmer, writes Bronwyn Farr.

The owners of a dairy that neighbours the immaculate Southern Hemisphere arm of Coolmore, a 3642-hectare pocket of rich alluvial country at Jerrys Plains in the Hunter Valley, were surprised recently when a young man with an Irish accent popped by to tell them he’d seen a cow having trouble calving, and after assisting, had moved her into one of their sheds. Later, they learned it was none other than Tom Magnier.

On an impromptu tour of Coolmore, framed by the imposing Wollemi Ranges, Tom is as delighted as any other farmer about recent rain. His public profile, at least in Thoroughbred circles, has increased considerably in recent years, as he has set about purchasing superlative mares such as 2012 Magic Millions broodmare sale headline act Melito, a $1,650,000 buy, and at the same sale a few years earlier, Surrealist (pictured with Tom), for $1.6 million, and Gypsy Dancer, for $1.5 million.

But Tom has been determined to maintain a low-key presence at Coolmore Australia, quietly working in the background, undertaking hands-on stints in various roles on the farm. “I came down for three months in 2000, just before the Sydney Olympics, and my father encouraged me to make Australia home. He believes very strongly the future is here, in Australia, so I worked with yearlings, mares, stallions, basically,” Tom said.

In 1971, aged 23, John Magnier, along with his future father-in-law, the legendary Irish trainer Vincent O’Brien, and the visionary Robert Sangster, pioneered and established the business of global stallions. The trio raided Keeneland Yearling Sales with impunity in the early 1970s. The results from those sale-ring sorties turned the Thoroughbred world on its head as they essentially brought Irish blood back from Kentucky to Ireland: early purchases included yearlings that turned out to be Epsom Derby winners The Minstrel and Golden Fleece, French Derby winner Caerleon and Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe winner Alleged.

Within little more than two decades, Coolmore grew from a 160ha plot in Tipperary to an international operation of unparalleled success, with holdings in Ireland, Kentucky, and the Hunter Valley, and more than 50 stallions. Vincent O’Brien, Tom Magnier’s grandfather, was voted the greatest racing figure of the turf by the British racing public in 2003. He died, aged 92, in Ireland in 2009.

Tom’s love of riding was encouraged by his mother Susan, Vincent’s daughter. Such is her eye for horses, she purchased Moonfleet - a horse Tom described as a failed National Hunt horse - as a four-year-old at Tattersalls in 1995. Moonfleet famously went on to win the world’s most coveted eventing prize, with Australian Olympic gold medallist Andrew Hoy, winning Badminton in May 2006.

Tom and his four siblings rode at every possible opportunity and he evented successfully for Ireland. “Every spare moment we had, we were out schooling our horses. My mother is very keen on eventing,” he said. Tom never considered a career that did not involve horses. “We talked horses at breakfast, lunch and dinner. I would not have been any good at anything else,” he said. It is said Vincent O’Brien could “look into the soul of a horse” and Tom seems to have the same quiet, gentle approach, to horses and to people. “A lot of the guys here at Coolmore will tell you that when they were showing horses at the farm for Vincent years ago, Vincent would carry around one of those wooden chairs with a silver handle, and he would sit on it and observe the horse for ages,” Tom said. “If he came back for a third look at the horses he liked, he might look at the horse outside the stable for 20 minutes and then go inside the stable for 20 minutes and just be on his own with the horse and really see what this horse was.”

One such horse was the elegant bay Royal Academy - grandsire of Black Caviar - who died at Jerrys Plains in February this year. “His influence on racing here is enormous and will live on - he is probably one of the best examples of how shuttling stallions has worked.” Tom said Royal Academy’s Breeder’s Cup win in 1990 was his all-time favourite race. Royal Academy was a $US3.5 million yearling destined to join a roster of 36 sires at that time. Then eight-years-old, Tom vividly remembers watching the race with family on television at home in Ireland, knowing the entire country was cheering the horse home.

Vincent O’Brien had staked his reputation on the colt, and Royal Academy duly gave Ireland its first Breeders’ Cup victory. Glamorous Royal Academy captured everybody’s imagination winning the Irish 2000 Guineas and July Cup before being set for the Breeders’ Cup. “It was an incredible time,” recalled Tom. “My grandfather persuaded (champion jockey) Lester (Piggott) to come out of retirement to ride the horse. Vincent sent Lester to The Curragh and said ‘see how you get on today’ and The Curragh got a record crowd. Vincent offered him four rides and he rode four winners, and I think that proved to Vincent he could do it, so off they went to the Breeders’ Cup.”

“From a young age, it is the one race that sticks out my head. If anybody ever asks me, ‘what is a great race?’ that’s the first video I would put on to show them - I think Lester gave him the most unbelievable ride, while Royal Academy showed what a great racehorse he was and he beat a hell of a field. The atmosphere at that time was unbelievable - there was a lot of excitement, the stallions (Lomond, Caerleon, Sadler’s Wells, Last Tycoon, Storm Bird, El Gran Senor among them) were getting a lot of very good mares and the horses they were throwing were very good looking, and then they went on and did the job on the racetrack,” he recalled.

The tide is turning, and this spring Coolmore has a relatively fresh, young roster - Danehill stallion Fastnet Rock’s success is such that his fee is $275,000, although his fourth crop are only two-year-olds. Coolmore is synonymous with global supersire Danehill, who died prematurely in 2003, and seven of 15 sires on the roster are either by Danehill or have Danehill as their grand-sire. Tom thinks other racing jurisdictions would do well to take notice of Australia’s vibrant racing scene, apart from comparatively lucrative purses and bonuses, he notes the emphasis is hip, young, and innovative.

“Australian racing really caters for young people; it’s modern, it’s a fun place to be,” he said. Asked what he thinks are the most important sire-making races on both sides of the equator, Tom pointed to the fact Classic winners were prized in Europe while Australia was obsessed with two-year-old speed. He believes the Lightning Stakes (1000m) at Flemington is a benchmark race; Black Caviar has snared the last two editions of the Group One feature, but it has been a launching pad for stallion success with Lightning winners including Choisir and Fastnet Rock now domiciled in Coolmore’s stallion barn.

As well as being the biggest consignor of yearlings in the Southern Hemisphere, Coolmore is a major purchaser of yearlings - often horses the team thinks could be stallion prospects - as well as mares. Tom has the responsibility of managing an expansive portfolio of expensive bloodstock, and a notebook on his desk contains detailed information on the progress of Coolmore-owned racehorses. It is a rather impressive office. “Yes,” he agreed, slightly embarrassed. “In fact, it is Dad’s, and if he comes down then I will have to move out of it.”

Editor’s Note: Tom Magnier is a keynote speaker at this year’s Winter Workshop in our School Of Excellence on Monday, 8th and Tuesday 9th July. He is part of an array of stellar personalities in the line-up, and will speak on the Coolmore Story, “one of racing’s most memorable tales. For more details click here or contact Heather Morkel on 033 263 1081.

School Of Management Excellence, South Africa
School Of Management Excellence, South Africa

Heather Morkel +27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email heather@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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