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VAN WINKLE RIPS THE LIFE OUT OF SUSSEX FIELD

rip van winkle sussex stakes 2009 glorious goodwood video
rip van winkle sussex stakes 2009 glorious goodwood video

2009 Sussex Stakes

RIP VAN WINKLE

SUSSEX STAKES, GLORIOUS GOODWOOD

Why there is still debate around Sadler’s Wells’ status as a sire of sires, has us flummoxed us. Long ago, Fort Wood established himself as one of the best stallions of all time in South Africa, and while the rest of the world might’ve been waiting for confirmation from the countries to the north of us, it wasn’t long before El Prado stepped up to become Champion Sire of North America, while In The Wings was doing a grand job in Europe. Solid enough stuff, but still not convincing enough for his detractors. That issue must surely have been put to bed with the emergence of the world class stallions, Montjeu and Galileo, the latter of whom is the reigning champion in Europe, and is many people’s idea of the best stallion in the world today.

Galileo has already proven his versatility with two consecutive juvenile champions in Europe in Teofilo and New Approach, and he’s had world-class performers at his own pet distance, a mile and a half. His star performer in the Sussex Stakes at Glorious Goodwood yesterday was Rip Van Winkle, who stormed home to beat the horse that had landed the spoils in what many fans might previously have held as the best mile performance thus far this season.

Since Rip Van Winkle’s 2,5 length victim in yesterday’s score was Paco Boy himself (with the course record-breaking heroine of the Coronation Stakes, Ghanaati another four lengths back in third,) you’d have to believe this was not only the marker that all milers will have to aspire to this season, but the next horse to beat Rip Van Winkle (if it happens) could legitimately put his hand up for the title of the best miler in the world.

The last time Ireland’s Coolmore Stud risked Galileo for shuttle duties in Australia was the 2006 breeding season, and he’s now become too precious a commodity to travel. The result is, after this year’s sales season, there simply won’t be another southern hemisphere-bred Galileo available. That’s it, we’re afraid, but for those of you who have any aspirations of getting your fingers into the pie before year end, there’s no need to despair. The Summerhill draft at the Emperor’s Palace Ready To Run sale on the 8th November features two outstandingly bred daughters of this great stallion, the one from a family of the best filly in the world last year, Zarkava, and the other out of a Danehill sister to two Group One winners. We already know what the Danehill cross has achieved with Sadler’s Wells, and this could be another explosion waiting to happen.

emperors palace ready to run sale 2009
emperors palace ready to run sale 2009

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THE SADLER'S WELLS PHENOMENON

yeats and mick kinaneSolskjaer’s brother Yeats winning the Ascot Gold Cup with Mick Kinane aboard
(Photo : Alan Crowhurst)

The latest edition of the celebrated “bible” of European racing, Timeform’s Racehorses of 2008, has just landed on our desk, courtesy of Sheikh Hamdan’s Shadwell Estate. The founder of Timeform, the inimitable Phil Bull, was as articulate and as enthusiastic a scribe on the affairs of the turf as anyone could imagine, and its at times like this that we’re reminded of how well our industry is served in the intellectual sense. This is another spellbinding edition, yet it’s the commentary on Solskjaer’s brother, Yeats, that gripped us this morning including a reminiscence around his three consecutive Ascot Gold Cups, a feat achieved only once previously by Sargaro almost fifty years ago.

It’s the degree of research the authors of Timeform apply to their writings though, that make this book so worthwhile, and in Yeats’ instance, there are reflections on his remarkable sire, Sadler’s Wells. We quote:

Sadler’s Wells was happily still in good condition physically on his retirement, and he certainly owes Coolmore nothing. In fact, the most successful stud in Europe owes its phenomenal record over the last twenty years largely to Sadler’s Wells, since his achievements as a sire of top-class runners and his legacy as a sire of sires is remarkable. The earnings that have accrued to the stud have been similarly remarkable, Sadler’s Wells never falling lower than IR 75,000 guineas and much of the time standing at IR 200,000 guineas (or its euro equivalent), though, for much of his career, his fee was officially private. By some calculations, with adjustments for inflation, this puts the notional worth to Coolmore of Sadler’s Wells in the region of £400,000,000 (or R6 billion rand!).

Tony Morris wrote in the Racing Post. “In February 1990, after Sadler’s Wells had been represented by his first crop of three-year-olds, I ventured the suggestion that he might prove to be the best stallion ever to have stood in Ireland. It was an assessment that seriously underestimated his potential. Sadler’s Wells has been one of the very best stallions to have stood anywhere on the planet’. The judgement hits the nail on the head. As to the details, it’s a case of where to start. According to Weatherbys, up to the end of 2008, the progeny of Sadler’s Wells (who had 2,274 foals recorded on Weatherby’s database) have won three hundred and forty-nine pattern or graded races, including one hundred and twenty-seven Group 1 events.

Sadler’s Wells has been represented by seventy-two individual Group/Grade 1 winners, including twenty-five individual classic winners, a record six Breeders’ Cup winners and twenty-two Group 1-winning two-year-olds – the latter figure impressive for a sire whose progeny generally are ideally suited by middle distances.

He has been Champion Sire in Britain and Ireland a record fourteen times, thirteen of those in succession from 1992 to 2004, and also won the title in France in 1993 and 1999. He has been champion sire of broodmares for the last four years too.

Comparisons with stallions who operated a century or more ago are hardly fair, given the way the world of bloodstock has changed, but the previous record holder for the number of stallion titles was Highflyer, foaled in 1774 (none of the other sires with seven titles or more was foaled after 1881). Perhaps the best modern-day comparison is with US-based Storm Cat, whose retirement was announced not long after Sadler’s Wells, and for the same reason. Storm Cat is twenty-five, so he has not had quite so many runners, but he has sired around one hundred fewer pattern or graded winners than Sadler’s Wells, and fewer than half the number of Group/Grade 1 winners. Quite right Storm Cat is regarded as an outstanding sire, which puts Sadler’s Wells achievements into perspective”.

URBAN SEA DEAD

urban seaUrban Sea
(Photo : Irish National Stud)

URBAN SEA, Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe heroine and mother to Sadler’s Wells’ best racing son and European leading Sire, Galileo, has died during foaling complications at the Irish National Stud. Urban Sea gave birth to a colt by Invincible Spirit who has been placed with a nurse mare.

The French filly, Urban Sea, was bred by Paul de Moussac’s Marystead Farm and was foaled in Kentucky in 1989. Her sire was Miswaki, a son of the highly influential Mr Prospector.

Urban Sea had a competitive racing career which started as a two-year-old in 1991 and included victories in the Prix de la Seine, Challenge d’Or Piaget, Prix Exbury (Gr3), Prix d’Harcourt (Gr2), Prix Gontaut-Biron (Gr3) and the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe (Gr1), where she defeated fourteen Group 1 winners, before a fetlock injury retired her to stud as a five-year-old in 1994.

After retiring to stud in Ireland, Urban Sea was soon to became one of the world’s most successful broodmares. Her first foal by Bering, born in 1996, went on to win the 1999 Gallinule Stakes (Gr3) and her 1997 filly by Lammtarra was to fetch the highest price ever paid for a yearling at the 1998 Deauville Sales, a staggering EUR1,500,000.

Huge success began when Urban Sea’s owner, David Tsui, bred Urban Sea with Coolmore’s Sadler’s Wells, the result was a colt named Galileo. Galileo went on to win the Epsom Derby (Gr1), the first progeny of Sadler’s Wells to do so, the Irish Derby (Gr1) and the King George VI & Queen Elizabeth Stakes (Gr1) before being voted European Champion Three-Year-Old in 2001. We all know the success of Galileo as a sire today.

Urban Sea was bred again to Sadler’s Wells resulting in Black Sam Bellamy, winner of the Gran Premio del Jockey Club (Gr1) and the Tattersalls Gold Cup (Gr1).

In 2002 Urban Sea foaled a filly by Giant’s Causeway, named My Typhoon, who went on to fetch a record US$2,955,000 at the December Tattersalls Sale. My Typhoon has subsequently won several US Stakes races including the Diana Handicap (Gr1).

The influence of Urban Sea on the world of thoroughbred racing has spanned almost two decades and the class of this broodmare will be sorely missed.

The Summerhill team extend our sincere condolences.

NB : On a positive note and of interest is to the local market is that Lot 483 on our National Yearling Sales Draft is a Malhub filly who comes from the female line of Urban Sea. The filly is a first foal out of Modraj (By Machiavellian) out of a half sister to Darley’s King’s Best and Urban Sea.

Click here to view the pedigree of Lot 483

LEADING SIRES OF 2008

sadlers wellsSadler’s Wells
(Coolchaser/b2yor)

Northern Hemisphere GRADE/GROUP 1 WINNERS

STALLION SIRE LOCATION WINNERS
Galileo Sadler’s Wells
IRE
5
Giant’s Causeway Storm Cat
KY
5
Rock of Gibraltar Danehill 
IRE
4
Danehill Danzig
DEAD
4
Tiznow Cee’s Tizzy
KY
4
Kingmambo Mr. Prospector           
KY
3
Maria’s Mon Wavering Monarch
DEAD
3
Sadler’s Wells Northern Dancer
IRE
3
Street Cry Machiavellian 
KY
3
Unbridled’s Song Unbridled
KY
3
A.P. Indy Seattle Slew
KY
2
Chester House Mr. Prospector
DEAD
2
Dalakhani Darshaan
IRE
2
Danehill Dancer Danehill
IRE
2
Doneraile Court Seattle Slew 
KY
2
Dynaformer Roberto
KY
2
Gone West Mr. Prospector
KY
2
Indian Ridge Ahonoora
IRE
2
Montjeu Sadler’s Wells 
IRE
2
Muhtathir Elmaamul
FR
2
Nayef Gulch
ENG
2
Pivotal Polar Falcon
ENG
2
Rock of Gibraltar Danehill
IRE
2
Samum Monsun
GER
2
Smart Strike Mr. Prospector
KY
2
Tapit Pulpit
KY
2


Statistics from Thoroughbred Daily News

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YEATS : Finest Stayer of Recent Times

yeats and mick kinaneYeats with Mick Kinane aboard
(bbc)

For the third consecutive year YEATS brother of Summerhill stallion, SOLSKJAER, has won the coveted Cartier Champion Stayer.

Few horses have succeeded in capturing the affection of an admiring Flat-racing public like Yeats has done in recent times, but then only one other horse in history has managed to clinch the Gold Cup at Ascot on three successive occasions. Yeats joined fellow staying legend Sagaro in completing a hat-trick in the Royal Ascot showpiece in June ,and the Sadler’s Wells seven-year-old is rewarded with a third consecutive Cartier Champion Stayer Award.

With four Gr.1 victories under his belt before this year, Yeats was already established as the finest stayer of recent times. He made five starts in 2008, opening his campaign with a second successive win in the Listed Vintage Crop Stakes at Navan in April. True greatness then beckoned, and Yeats embraced it with a devastating five length defeat of Geordieland at Royal Ascot that saw him join the hitherto peerless Sagaro. A second Goodwood Cup was added as Yeats sauntered across the line seven lengths clear of Tungsten Strike.

Yeats suffered a reversal at Longchamp in the Gr.1 Prix du Cadran on 4th October as he finished a below par fifth to Spanish raider Bannaby. The great horse put that rival in his place on final start of the campaign when returning to Longchamp for the Prix Royal-Oak on 26th October. In a strong renewal of the Gr.1 contest, Yeats held the previous year’s winner Allegretto by a length and a half, with Bannaby back in fourth. Rather than a life at stud, Yeats seems set to return in 2009 when his adoring public will be willing him to a record fourth Gold Cup and perhaps another Cartier Racing Award.

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ZARKAVA TAKES HORSE OF THE YEAR

zarkava and christophe soumillonZarkava with Christophe Soumillon aboard
(Photo : APRH)

The unbeaten star filly Zarkava (Zamindar) was named Horse of The Year last night at the 2008 Cartier Racing Awards.

Europe’s equivalent of the Eclipse Awards were presented at the Grosvenor House Hotel in London, in front of an invited audience made up of leading owners, trainers, jockeys, breeders, racing personalities and the media.

Homebred by her owner, His Highness The Aga Khan, Zarkava won all five of her starts in 2008 to add to her two from two record as a juvenile. Showing tremendous versatility over distances from a mile to twelve furlongs, she captured two Classics, the Prix Vermeille and the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe, in which she overcame the best middle-distance performers in Europe to register a stunning two length victory.

In Horse of The Year category, Zarkava came out ahead of the Breeders’ Cup Classic hero Raven’s Pass (Elusive Quality), Epsom Derby victor New Approach (Galileo), five-time Gr.1 scorer Duke of Marmalade (Danehill) and dual Guineas winner Henrythenavigator (Kingmambo), who won 18 Gr.1 races between them this year. She also took the honours in the Cartier Three-Year-Old Filly division.

Princess Haya’s New Approach prevailed over Raven’s Pass in the Three-Year-Old Colt category, gaining his second consecutive Cartier Award, having taken the Two-Year-Old Colt Award twelve months ago.

This year’s Two-Year-Old Colt Award went right down to the wire with dual Gr.1 victor Mastercraftsman (Danehill Dancer) pipping the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf winner Donativum (Cadeaux Genereux),

The Two-Year-Old Fillies’ category went to John Gosden-trained Rainbow View (Dynaformer).

Heading the Older Horses was Aidan O’Brien’s Duke of Marmalade (Danehill), ahead of Marchand D’Or (Marchand De Sable), Yeats (Sadler’s Wells), Youmzain (Sinndar) and Darjina (Zamindar).

There was further glory for the Ballydoyle stable with Yeats, brother to Summerhill stallion Solskjaer, taking the Cartier Champion Stayer title for the third consecutive year.

Meanwhile, the Freddie Head-trained Marchand d’Or prevailed in the race for Cartier Champion Sprinter honours.

Sheikh Mohammed, described as racing’s biggest investor and benefactor, was voted the Cartier/Daily Telegraph Award of Merit winner. Although unable to attend the Cartier Racing Awards ceremony in London, Sheikh Mohammed was presented with his award in Dubai beforehand by Arnaud Bamberger, the Cartier UK managing director.

On his acceptance of the Cartier/Daily Telegraph Award of Merit, Sheikh Mohammed said: “I am delighted by this award. I love racing and breeding. We race not only in England and Europe as Godolphin is all round the world. I am very, very pleased with my racing company and my breeding operation. I love racing and I will always be involved in the sport. Thank you very much.”

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ROCK OF GIBRALTAR’s EAGLE MOUNTAIN back on track.

rock of gibraltarRock Of Gibraltar
(Stallions)

EAGLE MOUNTAIN returned to the track in fine style on the weekend winning the G3 Joel Stakes in Newmarket, England for South African champion trainer Mike de Kock. It was an incredible training feat for Mike and his team as this son of ROCK OF GIBRALTAR had suffered a pelvic injury earlier in the year and had been off the track for 349 days.

Previously trained by Aidan O’Brien, he was second to Authorized in the G1 Epsom Derby and runner up to Literato in the G1 Champion Stakes.

Coolmore’s Rock of Gibraltar (or ‘The Rock’, as he has become known) was a machine of a racehorse winning 7 consecutive Group Ones. He shuttles to Australia where he is standing for A$82 500 this season and has produced stakes winners in USA, England, Ireland, France, Japan, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, including multiple G1 winner MOUNT NELSON and G1 Gold Medallion winner, SEVENTH ROCK.

Amongst the exceptional draft of two year olds on offer at the Ready to Run sale on 2nd November is a good looking son of ‘The Rock’ who is catching the eye here on the Summerhill tracks. Come and see him in action as well as sons and daughters of GALILEO, ROYAL ACADEMY, FLYING SPUR, CAPE CROSS, MUHTAFAL and KAHAL at the Ready to Run gallops at Summerhill on 17 October.

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Pedigree Focus by Tony Morris



“FEMALE OF THE SPECIES IN THE SPOTLIGHT”
European Bloodstock News


When, some four and a half years ago, I chose the title for this feature, I was extremely conscious of its ambiguity; in fact, it was my deliberate intention that it should be open to two interpretations.

This was to be a slot where emphasis was generally placed on the distaff side of pedigrees – a weekly dissertation on some aspects of a female family that had become topical by virtue of a recent result in a major race.

But I did not mean to promote the view that pedigrees should be interpreted solely in terms of female lines. It stands to reason that a proper reading of any pedigree should give due weight to all its component parts; when science tells us that, at every mating, each parent contributes equally to the genetic make-up of their product, we are on dodgy ground if we choose to believe in direct lines as crucial to the inheritance of characteristics.

Indeed, we do not even need the evidence supplied by Mendel, and the many eminent authorities who have supplemented the knowledge that he imparted. Any amateur student of the Thoroughbred has long been able to recognise, by dint of minimal research, that male lines tend to flourish for a while, then fall into decline. It is not necessary to go back into ancient history to establish that fact; it suffices just to know how potent the lines descending from such as Hyperion and Tourbillon were 30 or 40 years ago, and to realise what is now left of them.

Similarly, it is common knowledge that female lines tend not to thrive consistently over long periods; their fortunes fluctuate, and frequently deteriorate when access to successful sires is denied them.

Furthermore, in a breeding regime which generally permits only a tiny percentage of males – those who are proven successful athletes – to procreate, but which provides that opportunity to almost all females, regardless of their performance on the racecourse, we kid ourselves when we claim that the Thoroughbred of today is the product of three centuries of selective breeding. We have selected the males for logical reasons, with performance as the chief criterion; the females have never been selected on that basis.

In truth, when we use the term ‘family matters’ in its other sense, suggesting that it has genuine importance, it is most often applicable only in terms of the commercial market. The convention of displaying catalogue pedigrees as we do has evolved precisely because the bottom line in any pedigree tends to be its weakest area. All the mares in other positions are there by reason of success in production, through descendants who have earned a right to breed; that is not necessarily the case in the direct female line, hence the need for catalogues to attempt to show just cause for those mares to feature in the breeding population.

And nobody need doubt that catalogue entries have tremendous influence on the perceptions of buyers. The amount of black type displayed on the page may make a huge difference to the value of any animal. Without question, in that sense, family matters.

In order to acquire a firm conviction that family truly matters to events on the racecourse, we probably need more weekends like the one just gone, when several big race results lent substance to the belief.

There was a Group 3 winner out of a mare who won the Oaks. Another was the third individual Pattern winner for her dam. A Group 2 winner was the second from his dam to have won at Pattern level this year.

Another successful at that level became the sixth major winner out of his dam, herself a victress of the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe. No less wondrous was the fact that the two Group 1 winners at Ascot were closely related in the female line – and only in the female line – the dam of one being full sister to the grand-dam of the other.

So, let’s hear it for the females of the species! Oaks heroine Love Devine’s St Leger-winning son Sixties Icon (Galileo) notched the sixth Pattern victory of a stellar career in the Cumberland Lodge Stakes. Sadima, already with Group 1-winning colts in Youmzain (Sinndar) and Creachadoir (King’s Best) to her credit, was responsible for her third notable scorer in as many years when her daughter Shreyas (Dalakhani) won the Denny Cordell Lavarack & Lanwades Stud Fillies Stakes at Gowran Park.

Mare aux Fees , who produced this year’s Prix Vanteaux winner in Belle Allure (Numerous), doubled her Pattern score for 2008 when Jukebox Jury (Montjeu) took the Royal Lodge Stakes, both having arrived in her late teenage years. And the celebrated

Urban Sea, last of her sex to have recorded a “triomphe” in the Arc, added to her outstanding record as a broodmare – exemplified by Urban Ocean (Bering), Galileo, Black Sam Bellamy, All Too Beautiful (all by Sadler’s Wells) and My Typhoon (Giant’s Causeway) – when Sea the Stars (Cape Cross) staked a claim for consideration for 2009’s Classics with his victory in the Beresford Stakes on the Curragh.

But it was surely no less remarkable that Raven’s Pass (Elusive Quality), now rated Europe’s champion miler after his dismissal of Henrythenavigator and Tamayuz in the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes, and Rainbow View (Dynaformer), Britain’s undefeated and undisputed champion juvenile filly after her triumph in the Fillies’ Mile, should share such a close connection in the female line.

The honours in the case of the Gosden-trained duo belong to sisters Words of War and Ascutney, respectively the 1989 and 1994 products of matings involving Lord At War (a male line grandson of the great Brigadier Gerard) and Right Word, a daughter of Verbatim from a family previously renowned for Grade 1 winners such as Danzig Connection and Pine Circle.

Right Word, who died in 2005 at the age of 23, was no great shakes as a runner herself, managing only one second place from six starts, but Words of War was a tough stakes-winner, placed twice at Grade 3 level, and Ascutney had a Grade 3 win in the Miesque Stakes to her credit. Words of War made her name as a broodmare swiftly, as her first-born was No Matter What (Nureyev), successful in the Del Mar Oaks, and next came E Dubai (Mr Prospector), a Grade 2 winner, Grade 1-placed in the Travers and Super Derby, and already a noted sire.

Ascutney already had a Grade 3 winner in Gigawatt (Wild Again) under her name before Raven’s Pass came along, while No Matter What had just one minor scorer on her CV before the emergence of the exciting Rainbow View.

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MULLINS BAY and STRONGHOLD : SUPER STUDS

mullins bay stallion

Mullins Bay
(John Lewis)


To the delight of all the connections as well as the insurers, Lloyds of London, MULLINS BAY and STRONGHOLD have had their first mares tested in foal. Both of the new “boys” on the block have settled into their new role as “superstud” exceptionally well and Greig Muir and his stallion team report that they are doing a sterling job!

MULLINS BAY has impressed all who have laid eyes on him and has been very well supported. Amongst his visitors are Garden Verse (dam of IMBONGI and SPRING GARLAND), Nordic Air (dam of ICY AIR), BRIDAL PATHS (Thekweni Fillies Stakes winner and sister to PICK SIX) and DIGNIFY (Golden Slipper winner and sister to J&B Met winner, ANGUS) to name just a few. He has had support from around the country with mare’s being sent not only by the local Natal studs, but also from the Eastern and Western Cape.

STRONGHOLD is proving exceptionally fertile as he has had a 100% strike rate to date with all of his mares tested in foal. The first of his ‘harem’ confirmed in foal was Deceptive Charm, a royally bred filly by KINGMAMBO out of a stakes winning SADLER’S WELLS mare. STRONGHOLD will be visited by a number of ‘foreigners’ this season as Modraj, a MACHIAVELLIAN mare out of a sister to Urban Sea (dam of non other than the great GALILEO), has been booked to him as well as Nadira (a NASHWAN mare out of a full sister to KAHAL) Also heading his way in the not too distant future will be Choice Field, the dam of G1 Gomma Gomma winner PICK SIX.

These exciting new editions to the Summerhill stallion barn are booking up fast so to avoid disappointment give Linda Norval a call on +27 33 2631314.

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SADLER'S WELLS : Has the world ever known his eclipse?

sadler's wellsSadler’s Wells pictured in 2006 with New Zealand Minister of Foreign Affairs, Winston Peters
(Fethard)

Pedigree Insights by Andrew Caulfield

As last week’s racing represented something of a lull before the storm of major events scheduled for the next few weeks, I hope you’ll forgive me if I look back to September 13. That day’s quartet of Group 1 races provided yet another reminder of the extraordinary talents of Sadler’s Wells, who figured as the sire of one of the Group 1 winners, Septimus, and as the sire of the dams of two others, Music Note and Conduit.

One could be forgiven in the past for wondering whether the unprecedented scale of Sadler’s Wells’ success as a sire would effectively restrict the opportunities available to his broodmare daughters, especially in the rather cramped upper echelons of the Anglo-Irish industry.

After all, he achieved a record 14 Sires’ Championships between 1990 and 2004 and has more than 2,100 foals of racing age, two of which - Galileo and Montjeu - rank among the most successful stallions of recent years.

Any such fears have proved groundless and Sadler’s Wells, the Coolmore giant, appears to be heading for his fourth consecutive championship as a broodmare sire. His daughters already have earnings in excess of GBP3million this year - over GBP1million more than his nearest pursuer, Darshaan - and they have 11 group/graded winners to their credit. As many as six of the 11 have won at the highest level, with Henrythenavigator, Creachadoir, Youmzain and Conduit scoring in Europe and Music Note and Grand Couturier in the U.S.

A noteworthy feature of the 10 mares responsible for these 11 group winners is how few of them made their mark while in training. The exception to the rule is Henrythenavigator’s dam, the Group 1-winning Sequoyah. Of the others, Coastal Path’s dam Coraline gained a minor win from five starts, while Sadima, the dam of Youmzain and Creachadoir, failed to earn black type despite showing fairly useful form.

That leaves us with seven mares. Rather surprisingly, the dams of Music Note, Conduit, Infamous Angel (G2 Lowther Stakes), Patkai (G3 Queen’s Vase) and Campanologist (G2 King Edward VII Stakes) were all unraced. Grand Couturier’s dam Lady Elgar beat only one home on her only appearance and Juno Madonna, dam of dual Group 3 winner Regime, failed to reach the first seven in two small races at Cagnes-sur-Mer.

The clear lesson is that it isn’t safe to ignore any daughter of Sadler’s Wells, largely because their sire always commanded a fee which guaranteed that the vast majority of his mates came from excellent families.

It is the depth of excellence in his daughters’ bloodlines which has often helped convert them from disappointment as a racemare to success story as a broodmare.

Another fine example is Saddler’s Gal, who failed to earn a single penny in nine starts, but who went on to produce the Japanese superstar El Condor Pasa. Several other Group 1 winners, such as American Post, Laverock, Medaaly, Sumati, the Italian Derby winner Morshdi and the Japanese Derby winner Fusaichi Concorde, are also out of unraced or non-winning dams.

Extract from Thoroughbred Daily News

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