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J B Met

Post Met: Pre Jackpot

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Post Met: Pre Jackpot

Saturday's J&B Met race meeting was as good a day's racing as we've witnessed recently, and while the margin of his heroics on Saturday might suggest that Futura is head and shoulders above his own generation, it's worth remembering that Legislate was missing and that the recent Highveld Triple Crown winner Louis The King, hot off his own sparkling victory in the Sansui Summer Cup (Gr.1), just didn't turn up.

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Futura Dominates J&B Met

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Futura Dominates J&B Met

The Brett Crawford-trained Dynasty colt, Futura, won the Grade 1 J&B Met at Kenilworth Racecourse in dominant fashion under jockey Bernard Fayd'Herbe.

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Legislate Withdrawn From J&B Met

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Legislate Withdrawn From J&B Met

Time ran out for trainer Justin Snaith Wednesday, after racing the clock to get Equus Horse Of The Year Legislate fully recovered in time to challenge for Saturday’s R2.5-million J&B Met (G1) feature at Kenilworth.

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J&B Met 2015 : Final Field

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J&B Met 2015 : Final Field

The R2,5 million J&B Met final field was announced last night and due to a few late scratchings, a field of just 15 runners is now due to line up for the 2000m spectacle on 31 January at Kenilworth Racecourse.

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Legislate Tops J&B Met Log

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Legislate Tops J&B Met Log

Legislate, Futura and Louis The King top the latest merit log the R2.5-million J&B Met (Grade 1) to be run over 2000m at Kenilworth on Saturday 31 January.

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J&B MET 2014 : THE TIME FOR TALKING IS OVER

No Worries Horse
No Worries Horse

No Worries

(Photo : Gold Circle)

J&B MET (Grade 1)

Kenilworth, Turf, 2000m

1 February 2014

The time for talking is over. Eighteen of South Africa’s finest thoroughbred racehorses line up at the Kenilworth 2000m start in Saturday’s Grade 1 J&B Met worth a cool R2,5 million… and this 37th renewal promises to be a humdinger.

It’s an open contest but L’Ormarins Queen’s Plate winner Capetown Noir looks set to finally slay the stamina ghost that has lurked in the shadows throughout his career.

From joint top-weight Jackson right down to the bottom of the scale, and the only filly in the race in Do You Remember, a case can be made for and against any particular horse. The final choice for the punter will inevitably boil down to gut feel and personal preference. Emotion over mathematics, as it were. That is the way the best J&B Met winners are really found.

The Summerhill-bred No Worries has had a summer of mixed fortunes down in the Cape. He stayed on really well for a gallant fourth 2,30 lengths behind Capetown Noir in the L’Ormarins Queen’s Plate (from a bad draw). Piere Strydom rides Brian Burnard’s charge, again from the widest draw on Saturday. No Worries has the gate speed to overcome the poor draw and looks a likely pacesetter.

This graduate of the Emperors Palace Summer Ready To Run Sale goes into the Met a fit horse and his trainer Gavin van Zyl, has never had him better.

Listen to Gavin van Zyl’s pre Met podcast here.

Sporting Post’s Picks :

  1. Capetown Noir
  2. Master Of My Fate
  3. Royal Zulu Warrior
  4. No Worries

Extracts from Sporting Post

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J&B MET 2014 : FINAL FIELD

jb met 2014
jb met 2014

J&B MET (Grade 1)

Kenilworth, Turf, 2000m

1 February 2014

FINAL FIELD

#

Horse

kg

Draw

Jockey

Trainer

1

JACKSON

60.0

14

G Hatt

Brett Crawford

2

CAPETOWN NOIR

60.0

10

K Neisius

Dean Kannemeyer

3

WYLIE HALL

60.0

6

S Khumalo

Weiho Marwing

4

YORKER

60.0

2

R Fradd

Geoff Woodruff

5

MASTER OF MY FATE

58.0

9

S Cormack

Dennis Drier

6

WHITELINE FEVER

58.0

8

G Lerena

Sean Tarry

7

HILL FIFTY FOUR

58.0

13

A Marcus

Vaughan Marshall

8

ROYAL ZULU WARRIOR

58.0

1

K Zechner

Kumaran Naidoo

9

ICE MACHINE

58.0

4

K Shea

Dean Kannemeyer

10

JET EXPLORER

58.0

12

R Fourie

Justin Snaith

11

KING OF PAIN

58.0

7

B Fayd’Herbe

Joey Ramsden

12

LAKE ARTHUR

58.0

16

A Domeyer

Yogas Govender

13

NO WORRIES

58.0

18

P Strydom

Gavin van Zyl

14

MASTER SABINA

58.0

3

R Danielson

Geoff Woodruff

15

HOT TICKET

58.0

17

G Behr

Dean Kannemeyer

16

PUNTA ARENAS

58.0

13

G van Niekerk

Stan Elley

17

AWESOME POWER

58.0

11

M Yeni

Glen Puller

18

DO YOU REMEMBER

57.5

5

G Cheyne

Geoff Woodruff

www.jbmet.co.za

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A TALE OF TWO STORIES

Sabine Plattner and Yogas Govender with J&B Met winner Martial Eagle
Sabine Plattner and Yogas Govender with J&B Met winner Martial Eagle

Sabine Plattner and Yogas Govender with J&B Met winner Martial Eagle

(Photo : Gold Circle)

J&B MET 2013

This is an extraordinary story. It’s often hard to understand where big harvests come from, and Sabine Plattner and her racehorse trainer, Yogas Govender, are the best evidence of it. From opposite poles of the earth, like us, they have in common their modest beginnings. Sabine grew up in the shadow of the Great Depression and a Second World War which destroyed her homeland. She was a village girl from a humble but typically hard-working German family, and the forests around her birthplace, Waldshut, near the Swiss border were a family refuge of tranquillity, where the silence and the smells were a balm for the aftermath of the conflict. She sat on a horse for the first time at the age of two, when her parents couldn’t afford riding lessons, and she remains indebted to an aunt who sponsored these when she was a teenager.

Those of us who share her vintage, will tell you that growing up, our parents insisted we seek out a career in the professions before we ventured anywhere else, and Sabine’s destiny in those days was teaching. Along the way, she married Hasso, best known as the founder of SAP, one of the world’s pre-eminent computer management software companies, and whose triumphs in business were matched only by his sportsmanship. When his ocean racer, Morning Glory, took the line honours at St.David’s Lighthouse, his team had shaved 5 hours off the Newport/Bermuda record, pushing the sport into a new era. They did it again in the Sydney to Hobart.

At a time when the world had doubts as to where we were headed, the Plattner’s showed the attributes that’ve made them what they are. Not for them the timorous faintheart nor the “wait-and-see” of most of us. This was a call to arms, South Africa’s time had come, and she needed all the help she could get.

In the year in which Nelson Mandela became our first democratic President, the Plattners dug the first foundations for their world-renowned golfing estate, Fancourt; not long afterwards, Sabine made her first real estate acquisitions in the horse business, La Plaisance Stud in George and the Rondeberg Training Centre up the West Coast.

There are no shortcuts with this lady, and while I’ve yet to set foot on La Plaisance, I can tell you that Rondeberg compares with any private training establishment anywhere; it is unique in the world as the only one in a wild sanctuary. A fortnight ago, her fortitude was rewarded with a second J&B Met victory. There’s more on this dynamo in a forthcoming edition in these columns, but at the personal level, it was gratifying to read in a recent interview that her shining moment in racing was Angus’ victory in the 2003 J&B Met. Those on hand remember the Cape Town University students cradling her on a conveyer belt of arms to the Winner’s circle, aloft of the throng that stood in her path to glory. Angus was bred and raised at Summerhill with our clients of two and a half decades, Rodney Thorpe and Roger Zeeman, and was the second J&B Met victor for the farm’s most famous resident, Northern Guest.

Yogas’ story is an inspiration. His is a tale of the kid from the other side of the tracks in the South Africa of the early 1990s. While it’s true that today, the “Apaches” are well and truly in town (think Alesh Naidoo, Dayalan Chinsamy, Satch Mathem, Anthony Govender,) and are on their way to altering the demographics of racehorse ownership in this country forever, as we entered the 90s, there were just a handful of Indian owners, few of them with sizeable interests. For sure, this guy had the “illness” from a very early age, but there was scant opportunity for a youngster from a non-racing background, who’d never thrown a leg over a horse in his life, particularly if he was Indian and without qualification. That was the South Africa of those days, and few of us can imagine the impact on our self-esteem when, as a school-leaver, your enquiry to the Durban Turf Club about educational programmes for career-seekers in the game, was met with “don’t waste your time, you’ll battle to get in”. By 2001 Yogas Govender was more determined than ever to pursue his childhood dreams, and the characteristics that have made him what he is today, are what made them a reality. He knocked on every trainer’s door in the country, but just two replied. One of them, unsurprisingly, was Glen Kotzen, who needed somebody but was unable to oblige Yogas for his lack of experience.

Kotzen had opened the door however, if only slightly, and the young Govender set out for Clairwood Park at 4am in the April of 2002 for a meeting that was to reshape his life. Kotzen’s stonewalled advice that this was “not the glamour job people think it is,” fell on deaf ears, and Govender’s persistence paid off. He offered to work for no pay, if only Kotzen would give him the chance. He did. A decade later, and in just his third year as a licensed trainer, he took the 2013 running of the J&B Met with an injury-plagued seven-year-old that was retired immediately afterwards. Martial Eagle had risen, in the manner of his owner and trainer, from a merit rating in the 80s to winning the “big one” in a space of six months. The modesty of the man is as plain today as it was twenty-two years ago when he went cap in hand to the Durban Turf Club. “You don’t find champions, they find you. Martial Eagle just found me”.

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MARTIAL EAGLE SWOOPS IN J&B MET 2013

Martial Eagle wins J&B Met
Martial Eagle wins J&B Met

Click above to watch Martial Eagle winning the J&B Met (Grade 1)

(Image : Gold Circle - Footage : SABC 3)

J&B MET (Grade 1)

Kenilworth, Turf, 2000m

2 February 2013

Martial Eagle scored a hard-fought victory in the R2.5-million J&B Met (Grade 1) over 2000m at Kenilworth on Saturday.

The early pace was not overly quick and Piere Strydom aboard Pomodoro decided to speed up the tempo after about 800m and sent his mount to the front from Hill Fifty Four and Martial Eagle. Jackson and Slumdogmillionaire were well placed while stablemates Bravura and King of Pain were at the rear.

Pomodoro led into the straight but was soon challenged by Hill Fifty Four with Martial Eagle, Beach Beauty and Jackson in pursuit as Slumdogmillionaire quickly faded from contention.

Hill Fifth Four soon took Pomodoro’s measure but Martial Eagle now ranged alongside and the two went head to head for the line. Martial Eagle had the edge and kept going under jockey Aldo Domeyer to ward off a gallant Hill Fifty Four by a long neck. Beach Beauty edged Pomodoro out of third place, while Jackson finished fifth, 4.35 lengths behind the winner, with Tribal Dance sixth.

Martial Eagle, owned by prominent Cape owner Sabine Plattner, gave trainer Yogas Govender his first win from his first runner in the J&B Met.

FINAL RESULT

#

LBH

Horse

Kg

MR

Dr

Jockey

Trainer

1

0.00

MARTIAL EAGLE

58.0

112

14

A Domeyer

Yogas Govender

2

0.30

HILL FIFTY FOUR

58.0

107

13

M Byleveld

Vaughan Marshall

3

1.80

BEACH BEAUTY

57.5

112

10

S Cormack

Dennis Drier

4

2.10

POMODORO

60.0

113

7

P Strydom

Sean Tarry

5

4.35

JACKSON

60.0

114

4

K Teetan

Brett Crawford

6

5.10

TRIBAL DANCE

58.0

107

11

R Khathi

Vaughan Marshall

7

6.10

FABIANI

58.0

106

2

G van Niekerk

Glen Kotzen

8

6.40

KING OF PAIN

53.0

107

12

G Hatt

Joey Ramsden

9

6.60

BRAVURA

58.0

111

5

A Marcus

Joey Ramsden

10

7.00

ICE MACHINE

58.0

106

9

K Neisius

Garth Puller

11

7.10

SLUMDOGMILLIONAIRE

60.0

112

1

B Lerena

Gavin van Zyl

12

7.20

BLACK WING

58.0

106

8

F Coetzee

Brett Crawford

13

7.60

BULSARA

58.0

102

6

M Odendaal

Gavin van Zyl

14

8.10

MASTER PLAN

60.0

111

3

R Fradd

Greg Ennion

15

8.85

RUN FOR IT

58.0

109

15

B Fayd’Herbe

Justin Snaith

Extract from Tab News

www.jbmet.co.za

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J&B MET 130

J&B Met - Made To Fly
J&B Met - Made To Fly

J&B MET (Grade 1)

Kenilworth, Turf, 2000m

2 February 2013

Mike Moon
Mike Moon

Mike Moon

The TimesThe J&B Met is much more than a horse race. Raced in the dreamy Cape just as summer comes off its peak, it has come to symbolise the glamour of the racing game in South Africa.

If the Vodacom Durban July is all about power and glory - with the prestige of the country’s premier race, alcohol-fuelled corporate show-offs and big money wagering - the Met provides a more elegant, romantic interlude.

Met Day is like a huge garden party with equine entertainments. At Cape Town’s foremost social bash, being seen in the exclusive enclosures in eye-catching finery is, for many, at least as important as what passes the winning post first.

As such, the poshest do in racing is rather more than just the second-biggest race day in the land. A party with cavorting celebrities, outré outfits, sunshine and wine will always attract that extra bit of attention.

It’s small wonder whisky maker J&B has continued to pump money into staging the event since 1978, becoming horse racing’s longest-standing sponsor. J&B might already be an upmarket brand, but it still picks up priceless cache and glitzy publicity from the Met.

This is not to say the racing itself ain’t important. For racing folk, it’s right up there in quality, and for those of us who cannot be at glorious Kenilworth tomorrow, it is racing form rather than haute couture and haute cuisine that must be our focus.

Speaking of which, tomorrow’s 130th renewal looks a competitive affair - at least among the well-backed horses.

Handicap conditions for the Met are intended to ensure that the most talented horses do well. They’re not heavily penalised with weight in the saddle for their past successes and can show their true worth, all else being equal. This year the classiest contenders are also the ones with the most compelling recent form, theoretically narrowing down our choice of most likely winner. Top jockey Anthony Delpech, who hasn’t landed a choice booking for the Met, says he can see the winner coming from only “four or five” horses and hasn’t bothered to scratch around for a mount on an apparent no-hoper.

That seems a fair assessment.

Topping the betting boards at 18/10 is four-year-old colt Jackson, who is obviously a top racehorse and does well on this course. But many pundits and punters haven’t shaken off the bruising they took when he failed to meet a previous big challenge, in the 2012 Vodacom Durban July.

July winner Pomodoro has had a brilliant lead-up to the Met, with little having been in his favour. He has a good barrier draw, has had time to acclimatise to Cape Town and has the peerless services of Piere Strydom in the irons. Feisty mare Beach Beauty is consistent and is almost guaranteed to have a say in the finish.

J&B MET BETTING:

18/10 Jackson, 7/2 Pomodoro, 11/2 Beach Beauty, 10/1 Slumdogmillionaire, 12/1 King Of Pain, 14/1 Master Plan, 15/1 Bravura, 20/1 Run For It, 22/1 Hill Fifty Four, 40/1 Martial Eagle, 50/1 Tribal Dance, 66/1 Bulsara, Black Wing, 80/1 Ice Machine, In Writing, 100/1 Fabiani.

J&B MET SELECTION:

J&B MET (KENILWORTH RACE 8): 2 Pomodoro, 15 Beach Beauty, 4 Master Plan, 1 Jackson

For more information, please visit :

www.jbmet.co.za

Extract from The Times

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IN PRAISE OF IGUGU

Igugu wins the J&B Met
Igugu wins the J&B Met

Click above to watch Igugu winning the 2012 J&B Met (Grade 1)

(Image : Gold Circle - Footage - SABC3)

“Heroine of the 2012 J&B Met”

david thiselton
david thiselton

David ThiseltonIn the run-up to the 2013 edition of the J&B Met we pay tribute to 2012 heroine, Igugu.

Racing enthusiasts from every corner of the industry cheered as one at around this time last year when the courageous filly Igugu, who is currently just a few weeks away from her overseas debut, passed the line first to complete a rare J&B Met and Vodacom Durban July double.

The greatness of the Mike de Kock-trained heroine’s win may not have been fully appreciated by all, as little went right for her in the build up and she had to overcome obstacles that would have been too much for an ordinary horse. De Kock recalled, “She had a respiratory problem and an ongoing foot problem that left us behind in our preparation. We ended up having to work her twice a day to catch up. She worked on the track in the morning and on the treadmill in the afternoon. There are not many horses that would have been able to take the work we gave her. But she has always been willing to do whatever you ask of her.”

Igugu had been due to run in the Grade 1 Paddock Stakes over 1800m for fillies and mares three weeks prior to the Met. The Galileo filly, who was four-years-old at the time, was virtually unbeatable at weight for age terms and her presence chased the opposition way, leaving a small field of only seven runners at final declarations.

The news early in the week of the race that she would have to be scratched due to an upper respiratory tract infection came as a shock to punters as she was the ruling J&B Met favourite. De Kock recalled, “Fortunately it was not serious and she was able to resume work quickly, which gave us just enough time.” On top of her intense work programme at Randjesfontein, Igugu still faced the arduous journey to Cape Town that she would undergo on the Tuesday before The Met. To compound matters, it was confirmed by the state veterinarians that she would have to stay in vector protected quarantine conditions while in Cape Town, as there had been an outbreak of African Horse Sickness within a 30km radius of Randjesfontein.

This meant being locked up at the Kenilworth Quarantine Station two hours before dusk until two hours after dawn, meaning De Kock and his team would not be able to check up on her at night, except through a viewing window. Igugu emerged from the station on the morning of the race sweating and she sweated up again in the pre-race parade. But De Kock was not concerned. Igugu went down to the post with her familiar shuffling style, which can be misleading, but to those standing on the rail nearest to her there was no mistaking the power packed into that unique action. However, it was a different story in the race, at least until the final 200 metres.

After the off she struggled to get into her usual good early position. Fortunately she had a top class pilot aboard, her regular rider Anthony Delpech, who didn’t waste any energy pursuing plan ‘A’. Instead he eased her back, meaning she would have to come from further off them than she was used to. However, half way down the straight her winning chances looked gone. At a stage she was normally pulling clear, she appeared to be under pressure and still had two lengths to make up on Bravura. However, from somewhere deep in her reserves, she found another gear and surged past Bravura two strides from the line to win by 0,4 lengths.

De Kock said that the five-year-old mare was in great shape in his Dubai yard, despite a few hiccups during her arduous five month journey to get there. “The flight from Mauritius to England took 26 hours to complete because of a few delays,” he said. “Then she had a splint (pain in the splint bone usually after exercise) after a sprint up in England.” He continued, “But she has done very well since arriving in Dubai and we’ve had a free ride with her since then.”

The Summerhill Ready To Run graduate will make her Dubai debut in the Grade 2 Balanchine for fillies and mares over 1800m on turf on February 21, a race De Kock has won for the last two years running with River Jetez and Mahbooba respectively. One certainty is that the South African racing fraternity will be rooting for her every step of the way.

Extracts from Mike de Kock Racing

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J&B MET 2013 : IT IS TRUE, GREAT PLEASURE IS RARE

Igugu as a Foal
Igugu as a Foal

Igugu as a foal with dam, Zarinia

(Photo : Summerhill Archives)

J&B MET (Grade 1)

Kenilworth, Turf, 2000m

2 February 2013

While most scribes have been concentrating on matters of horses and fashion in their coverage of Saturday’s J&B Met, we’re going to talk a little bit about history. The sponsors founder, Giacomo Justerini arrived in London from Bologna in 1749 in pursuit, not of his fortune, but of a beautiful opera singer, Margherita Bellino, with whom he had fallen in love.

Though his pursuit of love was unrequited, he must have been comforted by his fortunes which prospered greatly; so that by 1760 he was able to sell the firm to George Johnson and retire to Italy. Throughout the difficult days of the London riots of 1780 and the Napoleonic Wars, George Johnson and later his son and grandson managed the firm with considerable skill, until in 1830 it was sold to Alfred Brooks, a young man doubly blessed by wealth and good connections. He added his name to that of Justerini and built up a discerning and knowledgeable clientele, amongst them Charles Dickens whose bills, still in their possession today, reflect his growing success as an author and his increasing enthusiasm for their products.

As for the Met itself, it’s come a long way since it was inaugurated in 1883 as the Metropolitan Mile, and its association with J&B dates to 1978, entitling it to lay claim to the oldest sponsorship of a current horse race in South Africa. Since then, it’s been graced by some of the greatest names in South Africa’s racing folklore. Politician, Foveros, Wolf Power, Model Man, London News, Horse Chestnut, Yard Arm, Pocket Power, Igugu. 4:30 pm Saturday is the next chance for someone to make new history.

While on the subject of history, in the modern era, no farm can match Summerhill’s three Met winners, La Fabulous (1996), Angus (2003) and Igugu (2012), while we came oh-so-close in 1995 when Imperial Dispatch and Rusty Pelican charged up the outer rail and to all normal beholders, crossed the line ahead of the rest. Champion Three-Year-Old Filly Icy Air was another denied the victory laurels when Alastor “half-lengthed” her in 2005. The weights for the J&B Met are framed to provide the best horses with the best chances, and in that respect, it’s unique among the big three of South African racing. There is only a 2kg penalty separating Group One winners from the rest of the candidates, though in merit rating terms, they might be as much as a stone apart. In effect that means that the Group One winners generally comprise the highest rated horses in the field, and are where the winner is most likely to spring from; on the basis, of this year’s entries, Jackson and Pomodoro are the penalty kicks. Yet racing is a funny old game, and none of us know what the horses themselves are feeling like on race day.

Last year, there were all sorts of misgivings about the welfare of Igugu, and the naysayers just couldn’t have hers among the numbers in the frame. They obviously didn’t know Igugu and had forgotten where she came from. She laid her adversities aside, soaring through in the dying strides, to nail Bravura and the young upstart, Gimmethegreenlight, in the shadow of the post.

The crowd gave Igugu a standing ovation as she passed the post, with the yellow lights of the infield timing board showing she’d equalled the long-standing record, which meant Bravura must’ve come close too. But it was Igugu’s day, she owned Kenilworth as no filly had since Empress Club. Briefly, the sport had returned to its most glorious days. For a moment, the punt doesn’t matter. For a moment, a horse is queen. Legless, but standing. Wave after wave of cheering rushed over sunny Kenilworth, the horses and jockeys were exhausted. It had all been too much.

Just this past week, we dug up a photograph of the “miracle” filly as a foal. Those that know foals can see the makings of a champion in these images.

Besides Jackson and Pomodoro, the Group One winners for the 2013 renewal include Slumdogmillionaire, Bravura, Master Plan, In WritingandBeach Beauty.

Gavin Van Zyl is not the only man bandying about the name of his charge, “Slumdog”, as there is more than one racing journo who shares his optimism. Let’s not forget too, that the enigmatic Bravura comes well at this time of the year, having won the Investec Cape Derby over the same course and distance on the same day two years ago, and then as we’ve said, pressing Igugu all the way in last year’s event. We guess though, that it depends on which “Bravura” turns up on the day. Don’t write off Beach Beauty either; she’s at the top of her game, and in Dennis Drier, she couldn’t be in more capable hands.

Greg Ennion is high on the hopes of Master Plan, who earned his Group One brackets in a nail-biting finale at Greyville on the closing day of the season in the Champions Cup, while Vaughan Marshall is known to rate the vastly improved Hill Fifty Four, a Group winner in both of his most recent starts.

We don’t want to appear parochial about this, but hope springs eternal in this game, and while his price of 75-1 suggests he is a forlorn prospect in this field, if Master Plan or Hill Fifty Four are in with any kind of a chance, then a fully fit Black Wing must enter the equation, if only for place money. Master Plan is 2kgs worse off for a short head beating of Black Wing in that Group One at Greyville, while there is a 3kg turnabout in the weights against Hill Fifty Four for a three length win in the Penisula Handicap (Gr.2) a few weeks back. That run suggests that there is nothing in it between Black Wing and Hill Fifty Four, while the turnaround with Master Plan, in theory at least, tells us that Black Wing has his beating.

This looks like a high class renewal, and most times in these circumstances, class prevails. What focuses the mind here is the fact that the highest rated entries are also in the best of form right now, and so it looks like a match between three, Jackson, Pomodoro and Slumdogmillionaire. Beach Beauty could be the “party pooper”.

Editor’s Note: Black Wing was a R50,000 purchase by Paul Gadsby off the farm. That was before we introduced the Emperors Palace Summer Ready To Run Sale. Who knows, it gave us Imbongi, Bold Ellinore and Emperor Napoleon. So there’s no reason it can’t produce another of their ilk. (Wednesday 20th February at the farm).

summerhill stud
summerhill stud

Enquiries :

Tarryn Liebenberg +27 (0) 83 787 1982

or email tarryn@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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J&B MET FAVOURITE JACKSON IN FINE SHAPE

Jackson - J&B Met favourite
Jackson - J&B Met favourite

J&B Met favourite, Jackson

(Photo : Hamish Niven Photography)

J&B MET (Grade 1)

Kenilworth, Turf, 2000m

2 February 2013

david thiselton
david thiselton

David Thiselton

Gold CircleJ&B Met favourite Jackson looked in fine shape at the Philippi training centre earlier this week, although trainer Brett Crawford won’t go into Saturday’s race without any concerns. The yard is also quietly confident of a good run from their other J&B Met runner, Black Wing.

Jackson is not the most well behaved horse at the starting stalls and having to jump from the pens twice in the Grade 1 L’Ormarins Queen’s Plate did him no favours. “He is an adrenalin horse,” said Crawford, implying the first jump would have taken a bit out of him. In the second start he was taken up handy. That is not his usual style, but the connections had already tried dropping him out from a wide draw in the Grade 2 Green Point Stakes and against a horse like Variety Club the ground can just not be made up. He over raced in the Queen’s Plate early on, so showed huge heart to still get up for second. However, the whole experience took its toll and he pulled up very distressed, suffering from heat exhaustion. Crawford, talking about his post race condition, said, “It is obviously always in the back of your mind. We did all we could for him and are happy that he has bounced back, but we would have preferred it if that false start hadn’t happened.”

Jackson is a big, strong horse, which will give him a good chance of overcoming the post race experience. However, the experience at the starting stalls, when difficult to load for the first start and then having to go through the whole process again, might be more of a concern, although the yard are sure to have done plenty of schooling at the pens since then. A big plus for his chances is that he has at last landed a good draw. Furthermore, he is unbeaten in two starts over the 2000m trip, both of the races in Grade 1s. He will not have to be chased from his draw of five, so should have something in reserve to launch his devastating finishing kick. He also always runs all the way to the line, with the Grade 1 Vodacom Durban July over 2200m being the only exception. Crawford reckoned the four-year-old Dynasty colt still had a relaxed temperament and pointed at his form. “He’s only been beaten by Variety Club in his last two starts and I think he would have got closer last time without the false start.” Talented jockey Karis Teetan will be aboard.

Jackson strode out well Monday when doing some light work on the light sand track.

Crawford said the Summerhill-bred Black Wing was doing very well and confirmed that he would relish the step up in trip. “It will be tough, but he’s in good form, ran a good last race and you never know what might happen with luck in running. He came from way back in the Grade 2 Peninsula Handicap to finish three lengths back to Hill Fifty Four and is now 3kg better off.” Black Wing is drawn nine with Felix Coetzee aboard.

Extract from Gold Circle

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