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ZARKAVA FOALS COLT BY REDOUTE'S CHOICE

redoute's choice stallion
redoute's choice stallion

Redoute’s Choice / Arrowfield (p)

“A very elegant colt that is correct and strong” - Georges Rimaud

Champion mare Zarkava (Zamindar) gave birth on Monday morning to a handsome colt by Haras de Bonneval resident Redoute’s Choice. The foal is described by Georges Rimaud, manager of the Aga Khan Studs in France, as: “a very elegant colt that is correct and strong”. Zarkava is now due to visit Frankel.

Redoute’s Choice, currently third leading sire in Australia behind his own son Snitzel, will cover a high-class book of mares this year, including 18 representatives of the Aga Khan Studs. These feature the dam of Gr.1 Prix de Diane heroine Valyra (Azamour), Valima, as well as the dam of Gr.1 winner Bayrir, Balankiya who is currently in foal to Gilltown Stud sire Sea The Stars. Gr.1 winners Rosanara, Shalanaya, Daryakana and Mandesha, as well a sister to Classic sire Azamour add to the prestigious list of mares for the dual Champion sire.

The Aga Khan Studs have made a successful start to the foaling season, with a number of other blue-blooded foals already on the ground.

Sichilla (Danehill) has given birth to a colt by Sea The Stars. She is the dam of young stallion Siyouni (Pivotal), who is fully booked for the fourth consecutive season at Bonneval. The first two-year-olds by this winner of the Gr.1 Prix Jean-Luc Lagardère are eagerly awaited on the racetrack this year.

Gr.3 winner Baliyana (Dalakhani), dam of promising Gr.1 1,000 Guineas entry Balansiya (Shamardal), foaled a Rock Of Gibraltar filly and will now be visiting Sea The Stars.

Last year’s Gr.1 Prix de l’Opéra victrix Dalkala is set to be covered by Dubawi. 2012 Gr.1 winner Ridasiyna (Motivator) and Gr.1-placed Sarkiyla (Oasis Dream) have both travelled to the USA to be covered by War Front and Street Cry respectively.

Extract from European Bloodstock News

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EUROPEAN HORSERACING ALLIANCE FORMED

european horseracing
european horseracing

“Racing is now a truly global sport and business and we want to extend our reach

to the four corners of the globe.”

- Elaine Hatton / Irish Thoroughbred Marketing

Irish Thoroughbred Marketing (ITM), Great British Racing International (GBRI) and the French Racing and Breeding Committee (FRBC) announced the formation of an alliance designed to attract international investment in European racing and the bloodstock industry. The alliance will be primarily focused on promoting Europe as the premier region to source and race the best horses.

“We are very excited about this project; racing is now a truly global sport and business and we want to extend our reach to the four corners of the globe,” said ITM’s General Manager Elaine Hatton in a statement. “This alliance will also add further strength to our organizations’ activities.”

GBRI’s International Executive Carter Carnegie added: “The world may be becoming a smaller place, but equally the horseracing industry is expanding all the time and we look forward to working together with ITM and the FRBC to draw international investment in our sport in Europe.”

Capucine Houel, Executive Director at FRBC concluded, “Europe offers a wide range of opportunities in breeding and racing and our role will be to state it loud and clear.”

Extract from Thoroughbred Daily News

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FIRST FOAL BORN TO FRANKEL

frankel stallion
frankel stallion

Frankel / Banstead Manor (p)

FRANKEL (GB)

Galileo - Kind

The first foal by undefeated dual world champion Frankel was born at Coolmore on Saturday night.

The new arrival, a colt, is the first foal out of six-year-old mare dual Group winner Chrysanthemum, who was the first mare confirmed in foal to Frankel last year. She raced in the ownership of Michael Tabor, Sue Magnier and Derrick Smith, the famous Ballydoyle triumvirate.

Born at 8.30pm on Saturday, the foal is reported by Coolmore as “a handsome colt with a good head, a white blaze and great presence” and is already being quoted at 66-1 to win the 2017 Derby at Epsom.

Juddmonte Farms general manager Philip Mitchell said: “From the reports that I have received, Frankel’s first foal is everything we could have hoped for. These are very exciting times for everyone who has supported the horse and we much look forward to the rest of his first crop of foals.”

Frankel retired to stud in 2012 as the winner of 14 races - ten at the highest level.

Standing at his birthplace Banstead Manor for an advertised fee of £125,000, the son of champion sire Galileo covered 133 mares in his first season, of whom 126 were confirmed in foal.

Extracts from Racing Post and Telegraph

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KITTEN'S JOY LEADING NORTH AMERICAN SIRE FOR 2013

Kitten's Joy Stallion
Kitten's Joy Stallion

Kitten’s Joy

(Photo : Ramsey Farm)

FOUR SIRES TOP $11-MILLION

From the desk of Bill Oppenheim

bill oppenheim
bill oppenheim

Bill Oppenheim

TDNHighlighted by an almighty duel which saw Ramsey Farm’s Kitten’s Joy (El Prado) nip WinStar’s Speightstown (Gone West) by no more than $15,000 for the title of Leading North American Sire for 2013, according to calculations for TDN sire lists, these two were still outdistanced by two European sires, Coolmore’s Galileo (Sadler’s Wells) and Juddmonte’s Dansili (Danehill), on the final TDN 2013 General Sire List, combining European and North American sires.

World Number One Galileo once again topped the charts in 2013 with 144 winners and the earners of $14,354,382, according to figures generated by The Jockey Club Information Systems (TJCIS). Galileo led all North American and European sires (hereafter abbreviated NA/EU) in four black-type categories, and tied with earnings runner-up Dansili in number of 2013 Group 1/Grade I winners, with six each. From 319 runners, Galileo sired 32 black-type winners (BTW) in 2013, and 65 black-type horses (BTH, won or placed in a black-type race); that’s 10% BTW/runners during the year, and over 20% BTH. He sired 20 group/graded stakes winners (GSW) - 6.3% of his runners last year - and a quite remarkable 46 graded/group stakes horses (GSH) - 14.4% of runners. His career totals now read: 129 BTW; 226 BTH; 81 GSW; 154 GSH; and now 33 Group 1/Grade I winners (G1SW), in nine crops of racing age through 2013. He’s the greatest since his own sire, Sadler’s Wells.

A fast-finishing and arguably unlucky third behind War Chant in the 2000 G1 Breeders’ Cup Mile at Churchill Downs, Dansili nonetheless went to stud a Group 2 winner at Juddmonte’s Banstead Manor Stud in 2001 for a fee of £8,000. He worked his way up until he started to attract the better mares, and ‘stood the raise’ which not that many do - and finished 2013 as the number two sire on the combined NA/EU list, with 124 winners and the earners of $12,887,396. Dansili finished the season with 26 BT winners and 42 BT horses, second to Galileo in both categories, and was also second to him in number of group/graded SH, with 25. As noted, he was tied with Galileo with six 2013 Group 1 winners, and was third in number of GSW, with 13.

Second in that category was Darley’s Dubawi (Dubai Millennium), with 16 GSW among his 21 BTW (ranked 5th in that category), of which four were Group 1 stakes winners.

Kitten’s Joy, with just five crops racing, captured the North American title, as mentioned by a margin of just $15,000. Kitten’s Joy had 24 BT winners last year, Speightstown 23. Each had 10 GSW, while Kitten’s Joy had five GISW, Speightstown four. Unlike other versions of the General Sire List, we do not count jumps earnings in North America, which is why Kitten’s Joy’s margin of victory over Speightstown is smaller on our list than on the other guys’. Moreover, there is a case that Speightstown - who was also second on our list in 2012 - really should be called the winner.

Because earnings in Japan and Hong Kong are so much higher than in North America and Europe, most sire lists, including ours, do not include earnings from Japan and Hong Kong. An example of the problem is this: when we computed the top 2% earnings thresholds for 2012 APEX ratings, the top 2% threshold in North America was $121,200; in Japan, the threshold is $425,698. These are roughly the same standard of horses, yet the horses in Japan earned 3.5 times the same level of horses in North America (over the seven-year period 2006-2012 the average was about 4x). So including Japanese earnings, and earnings in Hong Kong, generally can be dangerous. It cost Speightstown last year, though. He had earnings in Japan of $873,762, and even if we had divided them by four and included them, he would have comfortably topped Kitten’s Joy as North America’s Leading Sire. This controversy shouldn’t detract from Kitten’s Joy’s accomplishments, though, which included siring three Grade I winners in a single day last August 17 - all on the grass. In fact, over 75% of Kitten’s Joy’s 2013 earnings came in turf races - surely the first time ever a ‘turf’ sire has led the North American General Sire List. Also, 23 of Kitten’s Joy’s 24 black-type winners last year were bred by the Ramseys. This has occasioned some murmuring to the effect that, well, only the Ramseys get good horses by him, but I don’t know what people expected. He was a grass champion standing for $12,500, and the Ramseys were the only ones prepared to give the horse a real shot.

No doubt, the way these things work, as Kitten’s Joy’s stud fee has rocketed up and top commercial breeders start to use him, his results won’t be as impressive as they’ve been up until now, but it will hardly be the Ramseys’ fault if that proves to be the case. They’ve made him: good on ‘em. They’re going to get the Eclipse Awards for leading breeder and leading owner as their bonus, and so they should; I certainly voted for them in both categories.

Extracts from Thoroughbred Daily News

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WORLD WAR III

coolmore vs darley
coolmore vs darley

“In a game in which the principals all compete in the same profession, and where success and failure are both logged in the press every day, swirling envies always abound.”

For those of us who think that excellence in the racehorse breeding business, is vitally dependent upon the regular refreshment of one’s productive bloodstock, the annual retirement to stud of the world’s top performers is a matter of fundamental interest. For as long as we continue to believe that imported parent stock is superior to our local stuff, what happens in the Northern Hemisphere will remain the focus of our greater attention. After all, it has been thus ever since South Africans took breeding seriously, and the future fathers of our own prospects will be drawn from the ranks of the stallions that excel in those realms.

The bells of success have forever tolled for those that command the heights of the stallion business, and for close on three centuries, that hegemony rested with the English aristocracy, endowed as they were with the spoils of Empire. The curtain-call on Britain’s dominion over 40% of the earth’s surface, coincided with the rampant American economy of the 1940s, and the irresistible money of the latter’s industrialists soon transferred the pendulum of stallion power to the other side of the Atlantic.

Enter the son of a battling Irish farmer and his utterly gifted father-in-law trainer, backed by the riches of a football pools heir, and the 1980s spawned the emergence of a new force in the Emerald Isle. Given the economics of the time, Ireland was the most unlikely of places to champion a European resurgence, but when it comes to horses, only the ignorant would be foolish enough to ignore her horsemen.

John Magnier, Vincent O’Brien and the Liverpudlian Robert Sangster brought a new meaning to the word “genius,” and while knowing that the best racehorse (and hence, stallion) prospects were to be found in North America was, for them, the easy part, their knack in picking and funding the choice lots was what set them apart. Thus Coolmore was born, a temple to the glories of Vincent O’Brien’s masterpiece, Ballydoyle, the mysteries of which had fired the pens of journalists for five full decades.

The Japanese have long been the masters of imitation, so it wasn’t long before their own “genius”, the late Zenya Yoshida, cottoned on and developed a dominance of his own in his homeland, perfecting it by urging his domestic authorities to rewrite their racing programme to suit the discards of a European model which had served British and French racing so well for so long.

But back to centre court. Within a decade, the Irish-based triumvirate faced an onslaught from a hitherto unimaginable source with limitless pockets. Oil was the new world monetary system, and with their exposure to the intoxication of racing that comes with an aristocratic British education, the four sons of Dubai’s ruler of the time, succumbed to the charms of the sport. Magnier and Co. suddenly had a match on their hands, and before they could say “Jack Flash”, the Arab connection were the senior protagonists, if only from the perspective of what they could spend not only in the United States, but in their pursuit of the best produce of the best stallions already enthroned at Coolmore.

What has become of a rivalry that grew out of the internecine battle for racing supremacy in Europe, has been well-visited in these columns. In a nutshell, the balance of power at the racecourse ping-ponged between these two battalions, the one propelled by what seemed like a “bottomless pit”, the other by the instincts that belong only to those whose talents spring from generations of association with horses. Yes, measured by the standards of a former era, the Irish contingent had “cash”, but the resources at the disposal of Sheikh Mohammed et frère were on a scale no-one had seen or even contemplated before. The fact that the Irish were competitive at all, is the best testimony to our home-coined adage that when it comes to racehorses, a good eye can be just as good as a big cheque book.

In a game in which the principals all compete in the same profession, and where success and failure are both logged in the press every day, swirling envies always abound. The Arabs obviously had their reasons (the grapevine suggested they felt that the flow of the financial largesse accruing from their “mutual” patronage, was pretty much one-way traffic in favour of the “green” team) but out of the blue, the Maktoums decided about 8 years ago, that they would henceforth suspend their support of the Coolmore stallions, as well as their progeny in the sales ring. As the biggest buyers of thoroughbreds the world had known, in almost every other conceivable instance, this would’ve been the death knell for any operation, even one of Coolmore’s scale. After all, it didn’t only mean the withdrawal of their patronage of the stallions themselves, but it was a signal to all commercial breeders who continued their support of the Magnier stallions, that they could no longer count on Maktoum money to drive their prices. In short, it was a declaration of war, a war which has raged on for 8 unrelenting years, at considerable cost to the “boys in blue”, as the Maktoum contingent has come to be known.

It is one of the truisms of the game, that owners can be harder to train than horses, and when money and horses start to run, avarice and resentment are often not far behind. Ever since horses became a currency of their own, nothing has been quite the same. History has always served as a good teacher in circumstances like these, and for anyone plotting a strategy, a glance at the stallion logs of the moment would’ve made worthwhile reading. Sadler’s Wells had already racked up a world record sequence of 12 sires titles (he made it 14 in the end;) on either side of these, the Coolmore stallions, Caerleon and Danehill had their turns (Danehill was on the threshold of a “run” of his own, too,) and the European “top ten” seldom included fewer than seven or eight Coolmore incumbents. If you wanted to remain in the vanguard of European racing, the quick answer was that you had to stay with the Coolmore stallions. The Maktoums didn’t, and since that day, their challenge has “fizzled” to a trickle of its former formidable glory. That’s not going to change any time soon either, not until they “own the farm”.

Meanwhile, already ensconced at Coolmore were the successors to Sadler’s Wells; Danehill, his son Danehill Dancer, Montjeu and High Chaparral, aspiring champions the lot, as well as the inimitable Galileo, most people’s idea of the world’s best sire of the present era. To a man, they are products of a single lineage, the genesis of which lay in the early recognition of Northern Dancer as the “daddy of them all”, long before the rest of the world woke up. By contrast, the very ample ranks of Darley stallions in Europe, are populated by just a handful of quality proven stallions: Dubawi (a son of their own prematurely-deceased Dubai Millennium), Shamardal and New Approach, ironically the products of two Coolmore-owned horses, Giant’s Causeway and Galileo. In a sense, this is akin to “sleeping with the enemy”, and only serves to highlight the cost of that fateful decision to an operation whose ratio vivendi is centred entirely on the frequency of its visits to the big race winner’s podium, and blighted this year by two very unwelcome but much publicised charges for the possession and administration of quantities of illegal medications.

The one thing you can’t do though, is underestimate the ambition and determination of Dubai’s ruler: what Sheikh Mohammed wants, Sheikh Mohammed gets. In the wake of the “declaration of war”, he set out to corner the American stallion market by acquiring the top four performers of the three-year-old generation of 2007; together with his exceptional homebred, Bernardini, a cool $200 million laid claim to the Kentucky Derby star, Street Sense, Hard Spun and Any Given Saturday. Then he reached into a rich vein of genetic quartz, and brought home the exalted sire, Medaglia D’Oro. While the reigning champion of America, Giant’s Causeway (three titles 2009, 2010 and 2012) resides at Coolmore’s Ashford operation, Bernardini looks every bit the successor to his own illustrious father, A.P. Indy, and Medaglia D’Oro remains a force, though not with quite the zest he enjoyed at the height of his “heady” acquisition.

If the penny hasn’t already dropped, this is the background to the world of stallion supremacy, and why, in that battle, the only two parties that matter (in the Northern Hemisphere at least) if only because of the financial and genetic resources at their disposal, are Coolmore and Darley. Yes, there are pockets of genuine resistance (Juddmonte’sDansili and Oasis Dream and the immense but as yet unknown presence of Frankel) Claiborne’s War Front (Danzig’s successor, they say) and down South, the exceptional influences of Redoute’s Choice and, can-you-believe-it, another continental champion for Coolmore, Fastnet Rock. But the reality is, for the foreseeable future at least, these two leviathans of the industry, as diverse in their character as a lion and a hippopotamus, are likely to define the course of things.

Just four years ago (a few months after the fall of Lehmann Bros.) American studs announced the fees for their top new retirees: Curlin ($75,000), Big Brown ($65,000) and Henrythenavigator ($65,000). Since then, only four Northern Hemisphere stallions have stood for $50,000 or more, all in Europe, and two of them veteran “Australians”: Fastnet Rock, shuttling at an “opener” of €35,000 (+-$50k), and in an act of unusual daring most likely engineered by his own bloodstock chief, Georges Rimaud, the Aga Khan took on Redoute’s Choice at €70,000. The other two, arguably the two best European racehorses of the past 30 years, reinforced both the Aga Khan’s new-found entreprenurial verve as well as Prince Khalid Abdullah’s place at the main table of international breeding’s greatest players. Sea The Stars retired to Gilltown Stud for €85 000, while Frankel joined the Juddmonte roster at £125 000. Most betting men will tell you, the Europeans got the best end of that bargain, and looking at the prospects for 2014, it’s another case of “odds-on” Europe.

Top of the European “pops”, at least from a pricing perspective, is Coolmore’s aptly named Declaration Of War, given the theme of this report, who comes at a solid €40,000 (+-$55,000). Coolmore have obviously identified his sire War Front, as the reincarnation of his own father, Danzig, and as a font of future prospects, as they’ve done a fistful of business with that stallion’s principal Joseph Allen, and this fellow combines a “Giant’s Causeway” constitution and mind, with an enviable “milers” record for his place at the top of the stud fee tree.

It is a sad reflection though, on the role which fashion plays in the setting of stud fees, that as admirable a racehorse as Camelot should kick off at just €25,000. It is all the more mystifying since his own sire Montjeu, Galileo and High Chaparral, all giants of the stallion firmament, were like him, Derby winners. His “sin” obviously rests in the extended distances at which he excelled, while Dawn Approach, who like Camelot, was also a winner of the Group One Two Thousand Guineas at a mile, starts life at €35,000. Dawn Approach’s redemption rests in the fact that, unlike our Derby hero, he failed in the Derby, suggesting that his forte’ was at the shorter trips. Damn good miler that he was, there wasn’t €10,000 worth of stud fees between him and Camelot as racehorses. End of story.

Besides having displayed his prowess in Group One company at a mile, Camelot had the added distinction of crushing his Derby adversaries by five, in faster time than any of his mighty Ballydoyle predecessors, Nijinsky, Sir Ivor, Roberto, The Minstrel and High Chaparral, all stellar stallions in their own right. Here was an athlete with the precocity of a Champion Two-Year-Old, the speed to win a Guineas at three, and whose owners were the first since Nijinsky’s Charles Engelhard with the courage and the enterprise to allow a colt of his talents a crack at the Triple Crown. His pedigree spoke of “Elegance” and the “Enforcer”: by Montjeu from a Kingmambo mare, out of a daughter of Danehill, Camelot had done exactly what it said on the “tin”. When it came to the extended trip of the St Leger, the third leg in the “crown”, things just unravelled. One of the brutal truths of the game, is that when things seem almost too good to be true, they almost certainly are. All seemed so well in the world. It only took one race to change it.  And, it only took a horse called Encke, who’s not been seen or heard of since, to do it. That was Camelot’s sin.

Mercifully, the Coolmore team knows better. While Declaration Of War heads their freshman roster pricewise, it is Camelot’s honour to decorate the cover of their newly-released stallion brochure for 2014.

Dawn Approach aside (enigmatic he may be, but on his day, a world class performer with a big shot at Darley,) we’re not departing Europe without a word about Al Kazeem, recently syndicated among the “who’s who” of European breders for duty at The Queen’sSandringham Stud. The son of Sheikh Mohammed’s highly accomplished Dubawi, this debonair entertainer debuts at a fee of £18,000 (+-$30,000). Horses like Al Kazeem are an inspiration. In the simplest way, they symbolise the highest of athletic virtues, rock solid minds and massive physical appeal. It is always dangerous to get too anthropomorphic about horses, but given the calibre of those who’ve invested in him, there’s always mystique in the thought of how such a tough character will fare when he moves to the sultan’s life at stud.

The profiles of American debutants for 2014, is somewhat lower than that of their European counterparts, and appears to herald a subtle fall from grace of Kentucky, not long ago the undisputed capital of world thoroughbred breeding. Nice enough horses they certainly are, but in Orb, Paynter, Point Of Entry, Oxbow, Shanghai Bobby and Take Charge Indy, there’s little among those names to shiver the timbers of European breeders. The one horse who might’ve stirred some emotions across the waves were it not for his “non-event” at Ascot, is Animal Kingdom, the Kentucky Derby ace who, for a stretch of three months earlier in the year, bestrode the world as its highest-rated middle distance performer. He opens at Darley for a mouth-watering $35,000.

Hot off a nail-biting second in the 2012 Breeder’s Cup Mile, Animal Kingdom carried the colours of his breeders, Team Valor to victories in a brace of Group Ones in the opening months of the year, including a crushing defeat of an international line-up in the $10 million Dubai World Cup. South Africa’s Robin Bruss has previously engineered international transactions involving major racehorses and stallions, and one of his more celebrated achievements was the acquisition of the former Chilean champion sire, Hussonet, for duty at John Messara’s fabled Arrowfield in Australia.

Here Bruss was again, coupling Team Valor’s Barry Irwin with Arrowfield in a deal that saw Animal Kingdom go to “post” for the world’s richest race, in their joint ownership. A visionary in the Magnier class, Messara has always been pretty nimble when there is business to be done, especially when a “shrewdy” like Irwin has marked his card. Animal Kingdom’s World Cup was one of those moments when triumph is so complete, vindication so unarguable.

As he’d also demonstrated so often in the past, Sheikh Mohammed is seldom too far out of range when there’s the scent of a good horse in the vicinity, and he too, was quick to pounce in the World Cup aftermath. Few horses have gone to Royal Ascot with such expectations, and with the combined powers of two of the world’s great marketers and the money of one of the world’s richest men behind him, Animal Kingdom arrived in England carrying the aspirations of three different countries. The racehorse is such a symbol of hope and vitality though, that when they go down, as Animal Kingdom did before the eyes of the world at Ascot, the flame is so instantly extinguished, it comes as a choking shock, even in the remembrance. Otherwise, he should’ve been standing for $50,000 or more.

One race: that’s all it takes. Success governs everything in racing. It always has. And it always will.

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EUROPEAN RECORD TUMBLES AT TATTERSALLS DECEMBER MARE SALE

Immortal Verse - Tattersalls December Mare Sale
Immortal Verse - Tattersalls December Mare Sale

Immortal Verse (Pivotal - Side of Paradise)

(Photo : Tattersalls)

TATTERSALLS DECEMBER MARE SALE

2-5 December 2013

English and French Group 1 winner Immortal Verse sold in foal to Dansili for 4.7 million guineas ($8,090,580 in United States funds), a European record price for a broodmare, at the Tattersalls December Mare Sale 3 December.

Additionally, Rosdhu Queen and Dream Peace sold for 2.1 million guineas ($3,614,940) and 2.7 million guineas ($4,647,780), respectively, the trio helping to drive total receipts for the day past 30,000,000 guineas ($51,642,000) for only the second time in European auction history.

Overall, 190 horses sold for 34,478,500 guineas ($59,351,289), up 44.9% on last year’s corresponding session while average and median also showed double-digit percentage gains.

The average of 181,466 guineas ($312,375) represented an increase of 40.3% and the median rose 15.9% to 76,500 guineas ($131,687).

The clearance rate was 80.1%, compared with 81.1%.

Bidding for Immortal Verse climbed from an opening offer of 2 million guineas $3,442,280) from James Wigan. Winning bidder Adrian Nicoll of BBA Ireland had only to make two offers - the first at 4.5 million guineas ($7,746,300) - before securing the 5-year-old daughter of Pivotal for a price tag that surpasses the previous European record of 4.6 million guineas for Magical Romance at the same sale in 2006.

Immortal Verse was bought for a new partnership to be established within Coolmore, which earlier in the day bought Rosdhu Queen through Stephen Hillen Bloodstock.

“Everything was right with her,” Nicoll said of Immortal Verse, who was offered by Ireland’s Mount Coote Stud on behalf of U.S.-based Merriebelle Stable. “It was top whack for her, but she is beautiful.”

Rosdhu Queen, a 3-year-old Invincible Spirit filly and winner of the 2012 Cheveley Park Stakes (Eng-I), was offered in the Somerville Lodge consignment.

“She’s been bought for Coolmore,” Hillen said of the bay filly out of French group III winner Green Minstrel, by Green Tune. “I should imagine she is going to be one for Galileo. She is a beautiful filly, a great physical. She is by Invincible Spirit, who is doing so well, she is a group I-winning sprinter and won her group I (was) as a 2-year-old. You don’t get many of those coming onto the market.”

Hugo Lascelles landed the European Sales Management’s French group II winner Dream Peace, a 5-year-old Dansili mare who was third in the 2011 E.P. Taylor Stakes (Can-I) at Woodbine. Like Immortal Verse, she was bred by Kilfrush and the family has been developed by the farm for generations.

“She is for Frankel” Lascelles said of the half sister to 2003 Poule d’Essai des Pouliches (Fr-I) third-place finisher Catcher In The Rye. She is out of out of graded/group winner Truly a Dream and from the family of 2008 Darley Irish Oaks (Ire-I) winner Moonstone and 1981 Irish One Thousand Guineas (Ire-I) victress Arctique Royale.

Lascelles prevailed in the bidding from Badgers Bloodstock’sGrant Pritchard-Gordon, Greg Goodman of Mount Brilliant Farm, Fiona Craig, and Reiley McDonald.

“She will probably be staying in the (United Kingdom),” he said. “It is a truly wonderful pedigree, one of the very best. We have been underbidders on a few; it meant that we’ve saved some ammo.”

Extract from BloodHorse

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"DUBAWI OR NOT TO BUY" THAT IS THE QUESTION?

Arqana Sales Ring Deauville
Arqana Sales Ring Deauville

Deauville Sales Ring

(Photo : Arqana)

ARQANA AUGUST YEARLING SALE

Deauville, France

17-19 August 2013

In the midst of all the euphoria around the international achievements of the progeny of the world’s greatest stallion, Galileo, it’s easy to forget that he resides at the top of a golden collection. The world, and especially Europe, is packed with burgeoning stallion talent, a good percentage of them located at Coolmore’s three international strongholds, Ireland, America and Australia. One horse though, who stands out in their stern opposition Darley’s ranks, is Dubawi, whose stock from his best years at stud are only becoming mature horses as we write; the degree of respect he commands in the minds of the buying public, was in stark evidence at France’s most prestigious Yearling vendue, Arqana’s August Sale this past weekend. With two of the top lots in the auction (including the sales-topper at €1.5 million (just on $2 million), he was bound to emerge as the leading sire in a sale which continues the startling upward trend of recent international auctions, averaging €212,893 (+-R2,767,000) up 34.9% on a year ago, while the median rose 28.6% to €185,000 (+-R2,405,000).

The combined transaction boosted further a great sale for Dubawi, who was responsible for one of the joint-top lots of the first session, a colt out of Mise (Ire) who sold for €1 million to Peter and Ross Doyle. The Darley stallion is the leading sire at Arqana with eight lots sold for an average of €579,375, holding off Oasis Dream (GB), whose two lots have averaged €510,000 and Galileo (Ire), who has had 10 yearlings through the ring for an average of €461,000. Those figures go some way to telling the story of what Arqana representative Freddy Powell labeled “an unbelievable sale.” Strong is hardly the word for it, as another 37 horses from the second session sold for six-figure sums in addition to the two for €1 million or more.

When there’s a Galileo yearling on offer, it’s not unusual to find the Coolmore team taking an interest, and this time around the Ecurie des Monceaux consigned filly, who is grey like her mother and damsire Linamix (Fr), was knocked down to MV Magnier. It goes without saying that a Galileo yearling will own a pretty top-drawer pedigree. Alpine Rose only four years  ago won the G1 Prix Jean Romanet - the 2013 renewal of which was staged just a couple of hours before the second day of the sale commenced - and in her short time at stud she has made quite a name for herself. Last year’s sales topper, who made €1.2 million, was her first foal and now her second has also changed hands for a seven-figure sum. Bred by the Aga Khan, Alpine Rose’s two group victories both came after Ecurie des Monceaux gave €550,000 for her as a 3-year-old at the Arqana December Sale of 2008. Ecurie de Monceaux dominated last year’s August Sale when selling 24 yearlings for a total of €5,394,000, including the three most expensive lots, and it’s a similar tale this  time around. At the end of day two, the consignment had raised €5,040,000 from 17 yearlings sold, including the first session’s joint-topper, the Galileo three-parts sister to Irish Oaks winner Chicquita (Ire) from the family of Summerhill resident, Golden Sword.

From a local perspective, most South African-raced Dubawis are sourced in the Southern Hemisphere, mainly at Australian sales; first as an unknown entity, and then as he stopped shuttling to Australia (remarkably, for a comparative lack of success “Down Under”), just a few of them have made their way to South Africa. They’ve not been short on class though, yielding two Group One winners, both for Sean Tarry, first in the form of Happy Archer and now with Willow Magic, a leading juvenile of the past season, and the winner of the S.A. Nursery (Gr.1) during the Champions Cup weekend in Johannesburg at the end of April. Willow Magic is an obvious stallion prospect for Satch Mathen (a long-standing Summerhill client, who’s assembling some decent mares in anticipation!) and his partners, who look to have a progressive type on their hands under the talented tutelage of this year’s Trainer’s Championship runner-up. Whatever lies ahead for Willow Magic, you can be sure he will be expertly managed, and it could just be a case of “rich pickings” for Satch and his mates.

Session 1

Lot #

Sex

Sire

Dam

Price €

14

colt

Dubawi

Mise

1,000,000

33

filly

Galileo

Prudenzia

1,000,000

54

colt

Monsun

Sandy Girl

650,000

92

filly

Galileo

Zaneton

650,000

5

colt

Oasis Dream

Mambo Light

620,000

49

filly

Dubawi

Royal Highness

500,000

Session 2

Lot #

Sex

Sire

Dam

Price €

163

filly

Dubawi

Hit The Sky

1,500,000

99

filly

Galileo

Alpine Rose

1,000,000

132

colt

Galileo

Dibenoise

500,000

111

filly

Dubawi

Best Intent

420,000

101

colt

Teofilo

Alsace

400,000

185

filly

High Chaparral

Louvain

400,000

98

colt

Dubawi

Allure

360,000

120

filly

Fastnet Rock

Chabia

350,000

www.arqana.com

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SHOOTOUT: FATHER VS SON... AND GRANDSON

Galileo Stallion
Galileo Stallion

Galileo Profile (2012)

(Image and Footage : Blue Silk Productions)

“Blow-By-Blow”

bill oppenheim
bill oppenheim

Bill Oppenheim

Thoroughbred Daily NewsJust two weeks ago, Galileo had not sired a Northern Hemisphere Group 1 winner in 2013. Then, ten days ago, Magician won the G1 Irish 2000 Guineas, and that signalled a sea change.

There were three Classics last weekend: the G1 Epsom Oaks on Friday; the G1 Epsom Derby on Saturday; and the G1 Prix du Jockey Club French Derby on Sunday. In those three races, twelve horses, of course, filled the first four places. Six of the twelve places were filled by 3-year-old colts and fillies by Galileo. Two more were filled by first-crop 3-year-olds by Galileo’s son, New Approach. Two more were also from the Sadler’s Wells sire line: Sky Hunter, third in the Jockey Club, is by Motivator, by Montjeu, by Sadler’s Wells; and Jockey Club fourth Mshawish is by Medaglia d’Oro, by El Prado, by Sadler’s Wells. So, out of 12 horses filling the first four places, 6 were by Galileo himself, 2 by New Approach, and 2 more by other Sadler’s Wells-line sires: that’s ten out of twelve. One of the other two, Epsom Oaks third The Lark, is by Pivotal out of a mare by In The Wings by Sadler’s Wells. Only French Derby second Morandi, by Holy Roman Emperor out of a Bering mare, has no Sadler’s Wells in his pedigree; the other eleven do, and ten of them are in tail-male. That’s mighty convincing. The Epsom Derby and the French Derby were won by Galileo’s sons Ruler Of The World (RPR 121) and Intello (RPR 120), respectively. Libertarian, by New Approach, was second in the Epsom Derby, with Galileo sons Galileo’s Rock and Battle Of Marengo third and fourth. In Friday’s Oaks, Talent, by New Approach, was the shock 20-1 winner, upsetting stablemate Secret Gesture, by Galileo, with Moth, by Galileo, fourth.

See the accompanying table for the blow-by-blow. To say Galileo had a monster weekend would be seriously understating it; moving from 45th on the Northern Hemisphere General Sires List (where European-based sires are at a disadvantage with lower levels of prize money) into third just about sums it up. Galileo is such a dominant Classic sire now that it is tempting to compare his record thus far to that of his sire, the incomparable, 14-time Champion Sire, Sadler’s Wells.

Northern Hemisphere-Sired Group 1 / Grade 1 Winners by 3 Top Sires

Sire

Crops (of 3yo’s)

Foals

G1 Wnrs

Pct G1

G1 crop

Avg. crop

SADLER’S WELLS

23

2245

73

3.25%

3.17

97

DANEHILL

15

1351

42

3.22%

2.80

90

GALILEO

8

1063

30

2.82%

3.75

132

Given that Galileo’s 3-year-olds aren’t even halfway through their 3-year-old years, it’s entirely possible by the end of the year, Galileo will have even more Group 1 winners. Comparing him now to Sadler’s Wells and Danehill puts Galileo at a seven-month disadvantage; a fairer comparison will be at the end of the year, when his eighth crop of 3-year-olds will have finished their 3-year-old careers. With that perspective, it has to be said he compares pretty favorably with the other two top European sires of the last 25 years.

Galileo’s son New Approach, unbeaten Champion European 2-year-old of 2007 and winner of the 2008 G1 Epsom Derby, had a pretty amazing weekend himself, even given the total eclipse of the previously unbeaten 2012 Champion European 2-year-old of 2012 and 2013 G1 English 2000 Guineas winner, Dawn Approach. His star shone bright with Epsom Oaks winner and the Derby second, Libertarian, relegating the previous European 2013 leader, Raven’s Pass (Elusive Quality), like New Approach a Darley stallion, but based at Kildangan Stud in Ireland, to second in Europe. Talent and Dawn Approach make two Classic winners in his first crop, and Derby second Libertarian had won the important G2 Dante Stakes in his previous start, so that makes three 2013 graded stakes winners (GSW) for New Approach, and four overall.

EPSOM OAKS G1

1 1/2 Miles

Friday 31 May 2013

Pos

Name

Age

Sex

Sire

1

TALENT

3

F

New Approach, by Galileo

2

SECRET GESTURE

3

F

Galileo

3

THE LARK

3

F

Pivotal (dam by In The Wings, by Sadler’s Wells)

4

MOTH

3

F

Galileo

EPSOM DERBY G1

1 1/2 Miles

Saturday 1 June 2013

Pos

Name

Age

Sex

Sire

1

RULER OF THE WORLD

3

C

Galileo

2

LIBERTARIAN

3

C

New Approach, by Galileo

3

GALILEO ROCK

3

C

Galileo

4

BATTLE OF MARENGO

3

C

Galileo

PRIX DU JOCKEY CLUB G1

2100m

Sunday 2 June 2013

Pos

Name

Age

Sex

Sire

1

INTELLO

3

C

Galileo (out of a Danehill mare)

2

MORANDI

3

C

Holy Roman Emperor

3

SKY HUNTER

3

C

Motivator, by Montjeu, by Sadler’s Wells

4

MSHAWISH

3

C

Medaglia D’Oro, by El Prado, by Sadler’s Wells

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BIG BIDS IN THE BREEDING INDUSTRY

Hard Spun Stallion
Hard Spun Stallion

Hard Spun (USA)

(Photo : Darley)

“Round sums thwarted as Darley winning bids exceed fees”

Racing Post - 27 January 2013

martin stevens - racing post
martin stevens - racing post

Martin Stevens

Racing PostDarley Online Auction

The first round of bidding in an online auction of nominations to three of Darley America’s leading stallions ended on Friday with the winning bids all exceeding the horses’ advertised fees this year.

The nomination to Medaglia D’Oro, sire of nine top-flight winners including Horse of the Year Rachel Alexandra, sold for $105,100, just over $5,000 above his fee of $100,000.

Bidding reached $68,100 for the nomination to leading second-crop sire Hard Spun. His advertised fee this year is $60,000.

Former Australian champion sire Lonhro, who is shuttling to Darley’s Jonabell Farm in Kentucky for the second time this year, achieved a price of $41,100. He stands at $30,000.

The next round of bidding, for the second of three sets of nominations to those stallions, starts tomorrow.

Darley has heralded the prices as a “strong vote of confidence from industry breeders”.

What those three winning bids ending in $100 tell me is frustrated underbidders who offered nice, round sums will have to rethink their strategy.

Singspiel

It’s fair to say that when Singspiel died in 2010 obituaries led on his glittering racing career rather than his achievements at stud.

That’s not to denigrate his breeding record. Far from it. The son of In The Wings racked up 13 individual top-flight winners, but with only two stallion sons in Britain and Ireland, Eastern Anthem and Moon Ballad, who cover at £2,000 and €2,500, it didn’t look as though he was going to be a breed-shaping stallion.

Or so I thought, until I read through our New Stallions supplement in Friday’s paper and it struck me that Singspiel was the damsire of no fewer than three new recruits this year - Caspar Netscher, Debussy and Helmet.

Then you remember that last month Singspiel’s Grade 2-winning son Lohengrin supplied the first and third home from his second crop, Logotype and Gottfried, in the Grade 1 Asahi Hai Futurity Stakes at Nakayama. So there is hope that he will be supported by Japanese breeders this year.

For good measure Singspiel was also the damsire of another Grade 1-winning juvenile in Japan last month, Hanshin Juvenile Fillies scorer Robe Tissage.

With news this week that one of Singspiel’s last stars, Dar Re Mi, will be covered by Frankel, there is hope that Singspiel will continue to strengthen his influence on the breed.

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FABULOUS FRANKEL

Frankel Stallion
Frankel Stallion

Frankel

(Photo : Daily Record)

FRANKEL (GB)

Galileo (Ire) - Kind (Ire)

The long-awaited announcement of Frankel’s stud fee has been made. Those who follow these columns will recall our prediction that it would come in at around $200,000 - $250,000, and that wasn’t far off the mark at £125,000. If they book take 150 mares, that equates to somewhere between $25-30million a year, placing a value on him in the region of $150-200million. Last Tuesday, the son of Galileo was named “Cartier Horse Of The Year” for the second time, and while he has a little way to go before he matches his father’s fee of €300,000, he is by some stretch the second-most expensive stallion in Europe.

Philip Mitchell, general manager at Frankel’s new home, Juddmonte’s Banstead Manor Farm, said “We believe our stallion roster is the best we have been able to offer breeders, and we are very excited with both of our new arrivals. The fee for Frankel reflects his merits as perhaps the greatest racehorse we have ever witnessed. He is by Galileo, who is now recognised as the best sire in the world, out of Kind, a winner of six races, and herself a daughter of one of the most influential stallions in the history of thoroughbred breeding, Danehill.

Frankel stands this year alongside two other extremely popular sires in Oasis Dream and Dansili, both of whom are advertised at £80,000. Don’t even begin to convert those numbers into Rand; the depreciation in our currency in recent months, just puts these horses further beyond reach.

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NEW DAWN FOR SON OF GALILEO

New Approach Horse
New Approach Horse

New Approach (Ire)

(Photo : Darley)

GOFFS ORBY SALE

County Kildare, Ireland

3-4 October 2012

The horse that shaded Summerhill sire, Traffic Guard, in the Irish Champion Stakes (Gr.1) a few seasons back, is the new stallion rage in Europe. The first two-year-olds by New Approach, the world champion three-year-old of his year, got off to a wonderful start at Royal Ascot in June, and it’s been a tale of much the same ever since. His son Dawn Approach, trained by New Approach’s breeder and trainer, Jim Bolger, must be a virtual shoe-in for Champion Two-Year-Old this year, and the stallion’s popularity was very much in evidence on the opening day of the Goffs Orby Sale on Wednesday.

While it was New Approach’s day on the opener, inevitably the pendulum would swing back to his famous father, Galileo, which it did Thursday as the average and median soared to a few points short of 50% up on last year. We already know that the sale topper was acquired by Form Bloodstock’s Jehan Malherbe on behalf of Mary Slack and Mike de Kock for Mary’s new English racing yard, something of a feather in the cap of a country whose currency has eroded by some 5 or 6% in the past few months. Here are details of the top five colts and fillies, together with a comparative summary of the sales figures.

Colts

Lot No

Sire

Consignor

Buyer

Price (€)

377

Galileo

Tally Ho Stud

Form Bloodstock (SA)

800,000

26

Montjeu

Croom House Stud

Demi O Byrne

500,000

200

Pivotal

Croom House Stud

Mandore International

500,000

253

Montjeu

Airlie Stud

Mandore International

500,000

66

Sea The Stars

Redmondstown Stud

Bobby O Ryan

400,000

257

Cape Cross

Castlemartin Stud

John Warren

320,000

395

Teofilo

Airlie Stud

John Ferguson

280,000

55

Oasis Dream

Castlebridge Consignment

Demi O Byrne

280,000

250

Shamardal

Mountarmstrong Stud

Shadwell Estate

260,000

160

Fastnet Rock

Glenvale Stud

Stephen Hillen

260,000

Fillies

Lot No

Sire

Consignor

Buyer

Price (€)

12

New Approach

Redmondstown Stud

Peter Doyle Bloodstock

775,000

254

Galileo

Camas Park Stud

Form Bloodstock (SA)

470,000

141

Invincible Spirit

Castlemartin Stud

Moyglare Stud

420,000

255

Invincible Spirit

Lodge Park Stud

John Ferguson

380,000

245

Galileo

Airlie Stud

Hugo Merry Bloodstock

340,000

189

Ìnvicible Spirit

Castlemartin Stud

Moyglare Stud

330,000

1

Intense Focus

Remondstown Stud

BBA Ireland Ltd

300,000

35

Sea The Stars

Tinnakill House

David Redvers Bloodstock

280,000

205

Cape Cross

Croom House Stud

Peter Doyle Bloodstock

270,000

328

New Approach

Lodge Park Stud

Charles Gordon-Watson

260,000

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WHERE HAVE ALL THE STALLIONS GONE?

Keeneland September Yearling Sale - Top Lot 131 - Distorted Humor
Keeneland September Yearling Sale - Top Lot 131 - Distorted Humor

Top Priced Yearling - Hip 131 Distorted Humor Colt

(Photo : Keeneland)

KEENELAND SEPTEMBER YEARLING SALE

10 - 21 September 2012

While many an American breeder will take heart at the results of the recently concluded Keeneland September Sale, there is a stark reality about the numbers. The top stallion (by average), A.P. Indy, is in retirement, and he is at that stage where the commercial appeal of his progeny would ordinarily have been in decline. Yet the dearth of “big” alternative choices is such that A.P. Indy retains pole position, and while he is still such an influence in his own right, that he remains there is as much an indictment on those around him as it is a compliment to his staying power. While the names of Street Cry, Distorted Humor, Unbridled Song, Giant’s Causeway, Tapit and Smart Strike are all worthy of their own respect, they simply don’t have the pizzazz of the generation before.

Cast your minds back to the 70s and 80s and the awed silence which greeted a son of Northern Dancer as he entered the salesring; remember the great stallions contemporaries Mr. Prospector, Nijinsky, Danzig, Alydar, Lyphard, Blushing Groom, Riverman, Vaguely Noble, Raise A Native and Exclusive Native and the lesser likes of Secretariat, Sir Ivor and Caro. These stallions were the legacy of decades of investment by American breeders across the Atlantic, where they plundered the substantial larder of European bloodstock, including most of the top racehorses of the era and any emerging stallion who looked the part. The balance of power shifted to the States in what seemed like an irretrievable monopoly at the time, and studs like Claiborne, Spendthrift and Gainesway presided over a lock on European money for almost three decades. The traffic was one-way, justified by overwhelming dominance and the American conquest of a disproportionate share of the European classics.

It is the story of all empires though, that when you think things are going so well you believe you can take your foot off the juice, and that’s the story of American breeding. Complacency set in, and far from maintaining the levels of investment which had characterised the raids of Bull Hancock, John Gaines, Leslie Combs and others of earlier decades, they tended to sit back somewhat on their laurels.

A buying splurge triggered initially by Coolmore, Robert Sangster and Vincent O’Brien, and ratcheted up to unprecedented levels by the Maktoum family, has witnessed a resurgence in the stocks of Europe’s fire power; epitomised by Galileo, Montjeu, Dubawi, Dansili, Pivotal and Oasis Dream. These are the new colossi of the stallion universe, and you can expect the world and his dog to turn up at the Tattersalls Highflyer in early October, where we’ll see the fireworks for which the Keeneland sales pavilion was once renowned.

The truth is, if America wants to get back to the top of the pile, they will only do so through the strength of their stallions, which means if you want ‘em, go get ‘em!

KEENELAND SEPTEMBER YEARLINGS

Overall Top 10 Colts

Hip

Sire

Price (US$)

131

DISTORTED HUMOR

1,650,000

469

BERNARDINI

1,550,000

94

WAR FRONT

1,100,000

956

EMPIRE MAKER

1,050,000

41

STREET CRY

1,000,000

1021

SMART STRIKE

900,000

132

DISTORTED HUMOR

850,000

645

BIG BROWN

825,000

1004

UNBRIDLED’S SONG

800,000

807

GIANT’S CAUSEWAY

750,000

KEENELAND SEPTEMBER YEARLINGS

Overall Top 11 Fillies

Hip

Sire

Price (US$)

45

SMART STRIKE

1,300,000

128

A.P. INDY

1,100,000

124

A.P. INDY

725,000

125

A.P. INDY

675,000

1042

DYNAFORMER

650,000

960

INDIAN CHARLIE

650,000

51

INDIAN CHARLIE

625,000

654

TAPIT

525,000

81

DIVINE PARK

500,000

117

EMPIRE MAKER

500,000

349

TIZNOW

500,000

For further reference, please visit :

www.keeneland.com

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A Day To Remember

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A Day To Remember

In the 1980s I had a couple of years trying to help Robert Sangster with his mating plans. It wasn’t an easy job, because he had mares in both hemispheres, and he had an awful lot of mares who, quite clearly, weren’t very good.

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DEATH OF MONTJEU

Montjeu wins the 2000 King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Diamond Stakes
Montjeu wins the 2000 King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Diamond Stakes

Click above to watch Montjeu winning the

2000 King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Diamond Stakes (G1)

(Image : The Guardian - Footage : Sachahuista)

MONTJEU (IRE)

Sadler’s Wells (USA) - Floripedes (FR)

1996 - 2012

Montjeu (Ire) (Sadler’s Wells - Floripedes, by Top Ville), a champion on the racecourse who went on to become an influential stallion, died Thursday morning at Coolmore Stud following a short illness due to complications from septicaemia. He was 16.

Bred by the late Sir James Goldsmith, campaigned by Michael Tabor and trained by John Hammond, the bay captured the G1 Prix du Jockey Club, G1 Irish Derby and G1 Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe during his 3-year-old campaign in 1999. He added a facile score in the G1 King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes at four, and retired to Coolmore with a record of 11 wins from 16 starts. From his first crop, Montjeu sired G1 Epsom Derby hero Motivator (GB) and G1 Irish Derby hero Hurricane Run (Ire). He has since sired two other winners of the Epsom Classic in Authorized (Ire) and Pour Moi (Ire), and was represented in 2011 by GI Breeders’ Cup Turf hero St Nicholas Abbey (Ire).

Taken to Ascot for his crowning moment in the G1 King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Diamond Stakes in July 2000, Montjeu put up arguably his greatest performance - and visually his most stunning - when winning unextended and doing what Mick Kinane classed as ‘three-quarters’ speed.” His unextended 1 3/4-length defeat of Fantastic Light (Rahy), who would lower the colors of Galileo (Ire) a year later, in the 50th renewal of that midsummer feature, was a rare moment for the turfistes. For Kinane, the feel the great horse gave him that sun-kissed afternoon left him in no doubt as to his standing among the best he had ridden. “He knows how good he is,” he commented at the time. “That’s why he comes at them with such power. I would have liked to have held on to him a bit longer, but a furlong and a half out he just wanted them and I had to let him go.”

His faithful and adoring lad Didier Follop - who often had to ride Montjeu into the paddock before his races - and his understated but shrewd trainer John Hammond took care of nurturing his quirks and mighty ego, while his pilots Cash Asmussen and Mick Kinane imparted more than a share of their justified self-belief in the saddle. Together, they brought a brilliant talent to its peak and were touched by magic as a result.

“He was a really outstanding racehorse - one of the few outstanding racehorses I’ve ridden,” Kinane told PA Sport. “That King George win was pretty good all right. He treated them with contempt that day and it was just a privilege to be on board. He had some other good performances in the Irish Derby and the Arc, and he’s obviously going to be sadly missed. He had an aura about him and a few issues, and the great horses he’s sired have all had that as well - that’s what’s made them great. His fillies have been much better of late as well and I think he’s going to end up being an outstanding broodmare stallion. He’s going to leave a big hole in racing.”

“It’s really sad news,” Hammond told PA Sport. “He provided us with some magic moments. I was just very fortunate that he turned up at our place. The two days that stick out are obviously his wins in the King George and the Arc. He was fairly amazing at Ascot and the Arc win was special because I didn’t think he was going to win when the other horse got away from us. I think he showed his brilliance at Ascot and his courage at Longchamp. If he was a human being I’d describe him as an eccentric genius.”

When Montjeu entered stud in 2001, the jury was still out as to whether the all-conquering Sadler’s Wells would have a son that could approach his sire’s achievements in the breeding shed. However, his first crop indicated that Montjeu would be a force to be reckoned with. Motivator, hero of the G1 Racing Post Trophy at two, added the G1 Epsom Derby in 2005. Hurricane Run (Ire) captured the G1 Irish Derby and G1 Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe that season, while Scorpion (Ire) added victories in the G1 Grand Prix de Paris and G1 St Leger Stakes. Two years later, Authorized (Ire) also completed the Racing Post Trophy / Epsom Derby double. Fame and Glory (GB), hero of the G1 Criterium de Saint-Cloud in 2008, went on to capture the Irish Derby the following year, the G1 Coronation Cup at four, and added the G1 Gold Cup at Royal Ascot last season for good measure. St Nicholas Abbey, winner of the Racing Post Trophy in 2009, missed out on the major races as a 3-year-old, but returned at four in 2011 to secure the Coronation Cup and the Breeders’ Cup Turf. French-based Pour Moi (Ire) came with a furious late rush to take Epsom honors last June in what would be his final career start, and will now attempt to take his sire’s place at Coolmore. Montjeu was represented by another Racing Post Trophy winner last season in Camelot (Ire), and that colt is the current favorite for the June Classic at Epsom.

Extract from Thoroughbred Daily News

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SADLER'S WELLS RIDING HIGH

Sadler's Wells Stallion
Sadler's Wells Stallion

Sadler’s Wells

(Painting : Susan Crawford)

LEADING SIRES

BY 2011 NORTHERN HEMISPHERE

GRADE/GROUP 1 WINNERS

Standing in U.S. and Europe

Stallion

Sire

G1 Winner

Galileo (Ire)

Sadler’s Wells

10

Montjeu (Ire)

Sadler’s Wells

8

Giant’s Causeway (USA)

Storm Cat

3

High Chaparral (Ire)

Sadler’s Wells

3

Mr. Greeley (USA)

Gone West

3

Oasis Dream (GB)

Green Desert

3

Dalakhani (Ire)

Darshaan

2

Danehill Dancer (Ire)

Danehill

2

Dubawi (Ire)

Dubai Millennium

2

Dynaformer (USA)

Roberto

2

Empire Maker (USA)

Unbridled

2

Exceed and Excel (Aus)

Danehill

2

Hawk Wing (USA)

Woodman

2

Lomitas (GB)

Niniski

2

Medaglia d’Oro (USA)

El Prado

2

Mineshaft (USA)

A.P. Indy

2

More Than Ready (USA)

Southern Halo

2

Northern Afleet (USA)

Afleet

2

Refuse To Bend (Ire)

Sadler’s Wells

2

Sakhee (USA)

Bahri

2

Samum (Ger)

Monsun

2

Selkirk (USA)

Sharpen Up

2

Smart Strike (USA)

Mr. Prospector

2

Tapit (USA)

Pulpit

2

Tiznow (USA)

Cee’s Tizzy

2

War Front (USA)

Danzig

2

Correct as at 21 November 2011 (Thoroughbred Daily News)

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SEA THE STARS DOMINATES GOFFS NOVEMBER FOAL SALE

Goffs November Foal Sale - Hip 581 Sea The Stars
Goffs November Foal Sale - Hip 581 Sea The Stars

Click above to watch Hip 581 by Sea The Stars…

(Image : Goffs - Footage : Scandinavianraceweb)

GOFFS NOVEMBER FOAL SALE

15 - 17 November 2011

The progeny of Sea the Stars (Ire) got the first-crop sire off to the dream start widely expected yesterday as the concluding session of the Goffs November Foal Sale saw his five foals to be offered sell for a total of €2.86million for an average of €572,000.

Topping the quintet was hip 734, the impeccably bred colt out of Jim Bolger’s accomplished broodmare Affianced (Ire) (Erins Isle). She is already responsible for Ballydoyle’s high-class middle-distance performer Soldier of Fortune (Ire) (Galileo), who captured the 2007 G1 Irish Derby and the following year’s G1 Coronation Cup and now stands at Haras du Logis Saint Germain; and Group 3 winner Heliostatic (Ire) (Galileo), who has sired a group winner of his own from his first crop in Crius (Ire).

Bolger’s Redmondstown Stud sold three of the top four by the sensational Christopher Tsui homebred, and this particular blueblood will race in the yellow and blue silks made famous by his sire after John Clarke prevailed with a record-setting bid of €850,000.

First into the fray for the Sea the Stars brigade was his eagerly awaited first offering out of the MG1SW Finsceal Beo (Ire) (Mr. Greeley). Consigned by Michael Ryan’sAl-Eile Stud as hip 581, the chestnut filly is the second foal out of Europe’s champion 2-year-old filly of 2006 who also registered a Classic double in the following year’s G1 English and Irish 1000 Guineas and split those efforts with a narrow miss in the G1 Poule d’Essai des Pouliches. Auctioneer Henry Beeby asked for an opening bid of €500,000 before the action began at €100,000. However, the volleys lasted less than five minutes, and it was bloodstock agent John McCormack - acting on behalf of an undisclosed client - who outlasted Clarke to prevail. “She’s a filly with absolutely superb lineage and as a physical specimen she matched that,” said McCormack. “You’d have to think that she will have every chance. She’s a lovely, good-walking filly by a great horse and don’t forget that the dam very nearly won the English, Irish and French 1000 Guineas in the space of three weeks.”

The second of the Sea the Stars to sell for €800,000 was Redmondstown Stud’s hip 685, a bay daughter of Scribonia (Ire) (Danehill), who was secured by Mertoun Paddocks. A half-sister to a pair of daughters of Galileo who have placed in the 1000 Guineas in Cuis Ghaire (Ire) and Gile Na Greine (Ire), she also has the classy Indian Ridge (Ire) distaffers Luminata (Ire) and Aretha (Ire) close up. Mertoun’sRob Spears did the bidding on behalf of Ibrahim Araci, owner of the Classic-placed Native Khan (Fr) (Azamour). “She’s a foundation mare,” Speers offered. “She’s a fantastic filly from an excellent family, and over the last 12 months the good fillies and mares at the breeding stock sales have been coming in at a premium price range. €800,000 is a lot of money, but we believe that she represents a sound investment.”

Moments later, the Redmondstown’s hip 687 continued the irresistible momentum for the stallion when selling to Julie Wood for €300,000. Out of a winning full sister to Teofilo (Ire) - who was also prominent on Thursday’s results sheet - the purchase of the March foal was the end part of the masterplan. “We’ve been waiting a while for this day,” Wood explained. “This filly, like the other ones today, came from good, well-connected families, and it was quite special when these foals were coming into the ring, as you could feel the atmosphere around the ring. I bought an Exceed and Excel colt for €90,000 here Wednesday, and I do tend to buy a few foals every year. In fact, half of the 2-year-olds I had this year were bought as foals.”

Earlier, the lowest-priced of the Sea the Stars quintet became the first colt at the sale to break through the six-figure barrier. Hip 601, a March-foaled bay from Bill Dwan’sCastlebridge Consignment, is out of 2003 Listed Blue Wind Stakes victress Humilis (Ire) (Sadler’s Wells) from the family of Balanchine and was hammered down to Blandford Bloodstock’s Richard Brown for €110,000.

Extract from Thoroughbred Daily News

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CHAMPION MILER, CANFORD CLIFFS, RETIRED

Canford Cliffs
Canford Cliffs

Canford Cliffs

(Photo : The Telegraph)

CANFORD CLIFFS (IRE)

Tagula (IRE) - Mrs Marsh (GB)

Coolmore announced yesterday that five-time Group 1-winning miler, Canford Cliffs (Tagula), has been retired on veterinary advice and will stand at Coolmore Stud for the 2012 season.

Canford Cliffs suffered an injury to his near-fore pastern during Sussex Stakes (Gr1) at Goodwood last week where he finished second to Frankel (Galileo).

His trainer Richard Hannon said: “Canford Cliffs was a very rare type in that he had such great early speed as a two-year-old but also stretched out to be a superb miler at three and four. He is without doubt the best horse I have had in over 40 years as a trainer. It’s bitterly disappointing for his owners and for everyone here in East Everleigh that he had to be retired due to injury but at least it does explain why he hung so badly at Goodwood. We were very much looking forward to taking on Frankel again.”

A €46,000 foal purchase at the Goffs November Foal Sale, he was then sold as a yearling for £50,000 at the Doncaster St Leger Sale. At two, Canford Cliffs won the Coventry Stakes (Gr2) over 6 furlongs by six lengths. In his Classic year, he finished third in the 2,000 Guineas (Gr1) to Makfi (Dubawi) and then went on to win the Irish 2,000 Guineas (Gr1), the St James’s Palace Stakes (Gr1) and then the Sussex Stakes (Gr1). He finished off the year with a 1 1/4 length victory over Worthadd (Dubawi) in the Lockinge Stakes (Gr1).

Canford Cliffs started off this year with a one-length victory in the Queen Anne Stakes (Gr1) at Royal Ascot beating Goldikova (Anabaa). His eleventh and final start came last week at Goodwood. Canford Cliffs had never finished unplaced; winning seven of his 11 career starts and being placed second twice and third twice.

Coolmore’s MV Magnier said: “Ever since we bought into him last year many of the top breeders in Europe have shown a very keen interest in him so I have no doubt he will be a very popular stallion.”

Extract from ANZ Bloodstock News

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GODOLPHIN GET ONE BACK – AT LAST

Frankie Dettori aboard Blue Bunting - Irish Oaks
Frankie Dettori aboard Blue Bunting - Irish Oaks

Frankie Dettori celebrates Blue Bunting’s Irish Oaks victory

(Photo : The Guardian)

BLUE BUNTING

Irish Oaks

It’s been a tough year for Sheikh Mohammed’s Godolphin operation, with Coolmore and their associates sweeping all before them. Sunday things turned around for Sheikh Mohammed though, as Blue Bunting got up in the dying strides to take the Irish Oaks (Gr1) and grab the laurels by a nose. It doesn’t get much closer than that, though Coolmore-sired horses filled the next two places with Banimpire and Wonder Of Wonders.

The extent of the Irish domination of the European classic season thus far is apparent in the accompanying table, which reflects victory in 8 of the 10 classics in 2011.

Race

Cheque Earners

Sire

Epsom Derby (Gr.1)

1st Pour Moi

Montjeu

2nd Treasure Beach

Galileo

4th Memphis Tennessee

Hurricane Run

Irish Derby (Gr.1)

1st Treasure Beach

Galileo

2nd Seville

Galileo

3rd Memphis Tennessee

Hurricane Run

Epsom Oaks (Gr.1)

1st Dancing Rain

Danehill Dancer

2nd Wonder Of Wonders

Kingmambo

Irish Oaks (Gr.1)

1st Blue Bunting

Dynaformer

2nd Banimpire

Holy Roman Emperor

3rd Wonder Of Wonders

Kingmambo

English 2000 Guineas (Gr.1)

1st Frankel

Galileo

2nd Dubawi Gold

Dubawi

Irish 2000 Guineas (Gr.1)

1st Roderic O’Connor

Galileo

2nd Dubawi Gold

Dubawi

3rd Oracle

Danehill Dancer

English 1000 Guineas (Gr.1)

1st Blue Bunting

Dynaformer

2nd Together

Galileo

Irish 1000 Guineas (Gr.1)

1st Misty For Me

Galileo

2nd Together

Galileo

Bold denotes Coolmore Sires

Time was when Godolphin enjoyed their own dominance of the classic scene, but it was in the days when they still patronised the progeny of the Coolmore stallions in the sales ring. The “stand-off” has altered things somewhat, and while Dubawi and Shamardal put in an ominous run last year, they are notable by their absence this year. This can only be a temporary “blip” though, as they’re as decent a pair as there is, and we’re bound to see more of them and their runners in years to come.

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FULFILLING PEDIGREE POTENTIAL

Sadler's Wells and Darshaan
Sadler's Wells and Darshaan

Sadler’s Wells and Darshaan

(Image : Sport Horse Data/Aga Khan Studs)

PEDIGREE INSIGHTS

Andrew Caulfield

For investors in high-class bloodstock, there was something very reassuring about the results of all three European Classics contested over the weekend. They all fell to animals that were fulfilling the Classic potential of both sides of pedigrees, as all three are by stallions with previous Classic winners to their credit, and all three come from families that had produced winners of the Epsom Derby or Oaks.

The Investec Oaks went to Dancing Rain, who became the first mile-and-a-half Classic winner for Danehill Dancer, following his Group 1 Classic successes over a mile with Speciosa, Again and Mastercraftsman. Dancing Rain also became the third female Classic winner out of a daughter of Indian Ridge, this particular daughter of Indian Ridge being Rain Flower, a three-parts sister to the 1992 Epsom Derby winner Dr Devious.

Next in the sequence came Pour Moi, whose startling last-to-first effort provided Montjeu with his third winner of the Investec Derby in the space of seven years. Those seven years have also seen three other Montjeu colts win the Irish Derby and another two win the Grand Prix de Paris (many people’s idea of France’s true equivalent to the Derby). Consequently, Montjeu has unrivaled claims to being Europe’s most prolific source of mile-and-a-half Classic colts.

Pour Moi’s third dam is Northern Dancer’s famous daughter Royal Statute, who also ranks as the second dam of Snow Bride, the filly awarded the 1989 Oaks prior to becoming the dam of the 1995 Derby winner Lammtarra.

Finally, the Prix du Jockey-Club fell to the unbeaten Reliable Man, whose sire Dalakhani won the same race in the days before its distance was shortened. Some would argue that victory should have gone to another son of Dalakhani, the slow-starting Baraan, but that doesn’t change the fact that Dalakhani now has three Classic winners from his first four crops, the others being Conduit (St Leger) and Moonstone (Irish Oaks). Dalakhani’s crops haven’t been as large as those of some of his rivals - his three Classic winners come from a total of 288 foals in his first four crops.

Reliable Man’s Classic connection on his dam’s side comes from his second dam Fair Salinia, winner of the Oaks in 1978 before adding the Irish equivalent with the help of the stewards.

The other common denominator between Pour Moi and Reliable Man is the presence in their pedigrees of Sadler’s Wells and his old rival Darshaan. Whereas Pour Moi is by a son of Sadler’s Wells and has a dam by Darshaan, Reliable Man is by a son of Darshaan and has a dam by Sadler’s Wells.

Extract from Thoroughbred Daily News

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GALILEO : WORLD NUMBER ONE

Golden Lilac Poule d'Essai des Pouliches, Longchamp, France
Golden Lilac Poule d'Essai des Pouliches, Longchamp, France

Click above to watch Golden Lilac winning the Poule d’Essai des Pouliches (Gr1)

(Image : RP - Footage : France 3)

GALILEO (IRE)

Sadler’s Wells (USA) - Urban Sea (USA)

Golden Lilac’s impressive win in Sunday’s G1 Poule d’Essai des Pouliches marked Galileo’s 18th Northern Hemisphere-bred individual Group 1/Grade I winner from six crops of 3-year-olds and up - an average of three G1/GI winners per crop. They consist of 12 G1/GI-winning colts, an average of two per crop, and six G1/GI-winning fillies, an average of one per crop. They have won a total of 33 top-level races among them. They include seven winners of English, Irish, or French 3-year-old Classics (not including the G1 Irish St. Leger and G1 Prix Royal-Oak, of which he has had one 4-year-old winner each), including 2011 one-mile Guineas winners Frankel and Golden Lilac - both, as has been noted extensively, out of Danehill mares.

It’s hard to remember now, but at the beginning of 2004 - just seven short years ago – Sadler’s Wells’ stature as a sire of sires looked problematic. In the Wings, Barathea, the surprising North American success El Prado, and maybe Fort Wood in South Africa represented his best form to that time as a sire of sires. It wasn’t certain that Sadler’s Wells was even going to survive as a significant sire line. Montjeu was about to have his first 2-year-olds race (as were, in what turned out to be a critical positive turning point in Coolmore’s fortunes, Giant’s Causeway and Fusaichi Pegasus (two out of three ain’t bad) and, though the Montjeus had created a positive impression from the time they first sold as foals in late 2002, pretty is as pretty does, as we know. Nobody was climbing out on much of a limb.

By the end of 2005, things were looking up considerably for Sadler’s Wells as a sire of sires, thanks to Montjeu’s first crop which included three Classic winners: Motivator, Hurricane Run, and Scorpion. However, Galileo hadn’t yet made much noise; he didn’t have a black-type winner with his first two-year-olds in 2005, and entered 2006 well down in the second five among 2005 freshman sires by progeny earnings.

That was the last time there were any doubts about him, or the Sadler’s Wells sire line. Nightime won the G1 Irish 1000 Guineas in May 2006 and, by the end of the year, he had added two more 3-year-old G1/GI winners - Sixties Icon in the G1 English St. Leger and Red Rocks in the GI Breeders’ Cup Turf - and had the unbeaten champion 2-year-old in Europe, Teofilo, from his second crop.

Galileo’s stud fee quadrupled, from its low point of €37,500 in 2005 and 2006 to €150,000 for 2007. It’s been “private” ever since, though estimates consistently put the price of buying a season to breed to him as safely over $200,000 every year since 2008. He’s been leading sire in GB/Ire twice (2008 and 2010), and leading sire of 2-year-olds twice (2007 and 2010). Galileo’s six crops include three European champion juveniles: Teofilo (2006), New Approach (2007), and Frankel (2010). New Approach went on to win the 2008 G1 Epsom Derby, and Galileo has sired two winners of the G1 Irish Derby: Soldier of Fortune (2007) and Cape Blanco (2010). Those three Derby winners, along with Nightime and Sixties Icon from his first crop, and Frankel and Golden Lilac from his current (sixth) crop of sophomores, constitute his seven 3-year-old Classic winners. Besides BC Turf winner Red Rocks, his other top horses include two triple Group 1 winners, the colt Rip Van Winkle and the filly Lush Lashes. He already has four Group 1 winners so far among his current crop of 3-year-olds: besides Frankel and Golden Lilac, this crop also includes 2010 2-year-old Group 1 winners Roderic O’Connor and Misty for Me.

When all is said and done - in spite of all the sire analysis and statistics the likes of myself and many others come up with – it’s the horses we can identify as “household names” that set stud fees and sell seasons. Galileo has sired a string of them: unbeaten champion 2-year-olds Teofilo, New Approach (Derby winner), and Frankel (Guineas winner); Rip Van Winkle, Red Rocks, Cape Blanco, Soldier of Fortune, now Golden Lilac, maybe Roderic O’Connor, plus other 2011 Classic contenders, including Seville (2nd G2 Dante, to G1 Derby favorite Carlton House), Together (2nd G1 English 1000 Guineas), and Galikova (half-sister to Goldikova, won G3 Prix Cleopatre, will meet Golden Lilac next month in the G1 Prix de Diane). Voila: that’s why Galileo is the world’s number one sire.

Extract from Thoroughbred Daily News

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