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Australian Thoroughbred Breeding

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Redoute's Choice Tops Aussie Sires Championship

Redoute’s Choice (Aus) (Danehill) collected his third Australian general sires’ title when the 2013/14 season came to a close last week. The 18-year-old Arrowfield Stud resident amassed progeny earnings of A$10,287,243. He sired 96 winners of 150 races, headed by triple Group 1-winning sprinter Lankan Rupee (Aus).

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ON TOP DOWN UNDER

Cheryl and I are in the Hunter Valley, in their premier breeding jurisdiction as I write, on our occasional odyssey of some of their top stud farms. It’s six or seven years since we were last here, and it’s clear that whatever else the global financial calamity might have wrought on the breeding populations of the world’s leading thoroughbred producers, the Australian industry is in rude health.

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PATINACK FARM SOLD

Australian mining magnate Nathan Tinkler has sold his entire Patinack Farm racing and breeding operation to a group of parties from the Middle East, according to published reports.

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COOLMORE AUSTRALIA ANNOUNCES 2014 STUD FEES

“The response to Camelot and Declaration Of War has been most encouraging”

- Michael Kirwan / Coolmore Australia GM

Coolmore has released fees for its 2014 roster of stallions, which includes the new additions Camelot and Declaration Of War.

“The quality of the roster speaks for itself,” said Coolmore Australia’s Tom Magnier. “We have an enticing mix of proven sires and promising sire prospects that are priced to facilitate breeders at all levels. Our focus is on our clients’ continued success both in the sales ring and on the racetrack and we look forward to meeting with them over the coming months to discuss the great opportunities that our stallions present.”

Coolmore Australia general manager Michael Kirwan added: “The response to Camelot and Declaration Of War has been most encouraging. They are two particularly good looking horses and both have all the right ingredients for sire success. We have great faith in these horses and will be supporting both with quality mares from our own broodmare band.”

FEES 2014

Stallion

AUS$

CAMELOT

22,000

CHOISIR

29,700

DECLARATION OF WAR

27,500

ENCOSTA DE LAGO

38,500

EXCELEBRATION

22,000

FASTNET ROCK

Private

HARADASUN

5,000

HIGH CHAPARRAL

60,500

PIERRO

77,000

SO YOU THINK

55,000

SPINNING WORLD

5,000

UNCLE MO

16,500

ZOFFANY

8,800

Extract from European Bloodstock News

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IT'S A DUNDEEL... DUNDEEL RETIRES TO ARROWFIELD STUD

dundeel stallion
dundeel stallion

Dundeel / Arrowfield Stud (p)

DUNDEEL (NZ)

High Chaparral - Stareel

Saturday’s Group 1 ATC Queen Elizabeth Stakes victor It’s A Dundeel (NZ) (High Chaparral - Stareel, by Zabeel) has been retired to John Messara’s Arrowfield Stud to begin his stud career, it was announced Monday. The attractive bay will be known by his New Zealand registered name of Dundeel (NZ) and will stand for a fee of A$27,500.

“Dundeel was a racehorse of the highest class, effective at Group 1 level from 1600 to 2400 meters, with immense natural athleticism, a high cruising speed and a devastating turn of foot,” said Messara. “These attributes, combined with his undaunted toughness and courage, make him this year’s most exciting stallion prospect. We are delighted to offer him to Australian and New Zealand breeders.” added Messara.

Dundeel raced from ages two to four and collected six victories at the highest level in addition to the ATC Queen Elizabeth Stakes while carrying Arrowfield silks, including the Group 1 Spring Champion Stakes, Group 1 Randwick Guineas, Group 1 Rosehill Guineas, Group 1 Australian Derby as a 3-year-old and the G1 MRC Underwood Stakes last spring. Dundeel tallied 10 wins in 19 starts and over A$5.3 million in earnings.

Extract from Thoroughbred Daily News

therealdeel.com.au

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CURTAIN FALLS ON INGLIS EASTER SALE: YOUNG GUNS ON THE MARCH

Inglis Australian Easter Yearling Sale Sessions 1 Wrap

INGLIS AUSTRALIAN EASTER YEARLING SALE

Newmarket, Sydney, Australia

8-10 April 2014

The three-day Inglis Australian Easter Yearling Sale came to a close Thursday with overall sale clearance reaching 83%, 328 lots sold, an average of A$252,873 and a median of A$190,000. The average was the highest outside of 2013, when two high-priced colts added A$9 million alone to the gross for the past five years. The clearance was better than 2010 (80%), 2011-12 (82%), 2013 (78%) and only lower than 2009 (84%). Throughout the sale we have seen a very good clearance rate, said Inglis Bloodstock Director Jonathan D’Arcy. “The horses that had passed in during the sale have met with good reception outside. The overall clearance of 83% through the three days is very pleasing. If at any sale around the world you can be selling at 83%, I’d say you’ve done very well. The highest price paid at this year’s Easter sale was A$1.6 million paid for Lot 149, a colt by Fastnet Rock out of Perfect Persuasion, who was secured by John Warren Bloodstock”.

Offered during the first day of selling, the colt was consigned by Coolmore Stud, who sold a trio of yearlings at Easter, all by Coolmore stallion Fastnet Rock for in excess of seven figures. The sale concluded with seven yearlings bringing over A$1-million, with four falling on Day 1, two on the second day and one yesterday. “We all thought that the first day was the strongest, but it was just the way the alphabet falls, and that’s where a couple of the big horses were”, explained D’Arcy.

Added Inglis Managing Director Mark Webster, “The middle market was very strong, and I still think the top of the market was quite good as well. The number of yearlings making a million or more compared to other sales in the region is still well ahead of what everyone else can do. While gross, average and median dipped from the 2013 renewal of the sale when a pair of colts brought A$5-million and A$4-million during the first two sessions this season’s renewal of the sale compared with other editions over the past few years. I said before the sale that there was no way we were going to replicate those two big colts, so I am really happy with the result”, said Webster. “My goal coming into the sale was to improve the clearance rate and get it into the low 80s, so I think we have done that”.

Topping Thursday’s truncated final portion of Session 1 was Lot 403, a colt by Fastnet Rock out of Defiant Dame. Consigned by his breeder Coolmore Stud, the colt was secured by trainer Gerald Ryan for A$1.3 million. Thursday’s Session II also offered a couple of highlights, headed by Lot 523, a colt by Magic Albert, out of the Snitzel mare Eye For Fun. The half-sibling to G1 Golden Slipper heroine Mossfun was purchased by Sheikh Mohammed bin Khalifa Al Maktoum for A$750,000, the second highest price on the afternoon. “There are some yearlings that would sell better in Session II, it is a matter of placement, said Webster. If vendors were more open to Session II, they might actually get a better result in Session II. So that is something we would like to talk more about to some of the vendors going forward as it is a session that is producing good performers, like Mossfun who brought A$85,000 in 2013. The same buyers are here. One of the top sellers in Session II is Lot 450, a colt by Northern Meteor, who went to China Horse Club for A$650,00], so it is successful. And Hong Kong’s George Moore was the underbidder, so the big bidders are still here”.

Commenting on the overall quality of this year’s group of yearlings relative to what many thought was a superior lot offered in 2013, D’Arcy said, “I think maybe some stallions were just a little bit off this year. Last year, we just had the best group of Fastnet Rock colts and fillies that we had ever seen. This year just wasn’t the same, although we did have some very nice Fastnets, but they just weren’t the same caliber, as a bunch”.

On the other side of the coin, D’Arcy pointed out several other stallions improved over one year ago. “This year, we had some outstanding individuals by Street Cry and I think More Than Ready had the best group he has ever had at a sale, he said. I think horses like Sebring and Northern Meteor moved into the market. I think now we have a group of six or seven stallions in Australia that people are happy to go to over A$500,000, and as we saw, up to A$1.5 million for a Snitzel Lot 118, so the young stallions are really starting to hit the market in the sale ring”.

Leading the charge by gross expenditures through Session I was Shadwell Australasia, which signed for 20 head for a total of A$8.085 million. The operation was well ahead of Sheikh Mohammed bin Khalifa Al Maktoum, who took home four yearlings for A$3.625 million and topped Session II with a single purchase of A$750,000. “The other thing is we are not relying on any one buyer, said Webster when asked about the buying bench. The buying bench has been quite diverse with a couple of big buys for the Middle East, but we have had B. Wayne Hughes and John Moynihan from the U.S., Hong Kong, Chris Waller, Gai Waterhouse, Peter Moody, Gerald Ryan and some syndicators have been able to buy as well. Topping the vendors in Session I was Coolmore Stud at A$9.18 million for 29 sold, followed by Arrowfield Stud at A$7.61 million with 26 sold. Fastnet Rock proved far and away the best of the bunch with 41 yearlings selling for an aggregate of A$15,485,000, well ahead of More Than Ready who reeled in A$8,485,000 for 31 head sold”.

Inglis Australian Easter Yearling Sale

Day Three Top Lots

Lot

Sex

Sire

Dam

Vendor

Purchaser

Price AUS$

403

C

FASTNET ROCK

Defiant Dame

Coolmore Stud

Gerald Ryan

1,300,000

523

C

MAGIC ALBERT

Eye For Fun

Fairview Park Stud

Sheikh Mohammed

750,000

395

F

STARCRAFT

Dane Beltar

Mill Park Stud

David Redvers Bloodstock

650,000

407

C

MORE THAN READY

Diamond Like

Broadwater Thoroughbreds

Shadwell Australasia

650,000

450

C

NORTHERN METEOR

Saffie Darling

Widden Stud

China Horse Club

640,000

383

F

COMMANDS

Crossyourheart

Tyreel Stud

Shadwell Australasia

600,000

397

C

NORTHERN METEOR

Danni Martine

Southern Cross Breeders

C Lai

525,000

Inglis Australian Easter Yearling Sale

Session 1

Cumulative

2014

2013

Catalogued

437

422

No. Offered

393

372

No. Sold

328

290

High Price

A$1,600.000

A$5,000,000

Gross

A$82,942,500

A$84,444,090

Average (% change)

A$252,873 (-13%)

A$291,187

Median (% change)

A$190,000 (-5%)

A$200,000

Extracts from TDN/EBN

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INGLIS AUSTRALIAN EASTER YEARLING SALE DAY 2

inglis easter yearling sale day 2 street cry
inglis easter yearling sale day 2 street cry

Lot 224 Street Cry - Star On High topped Inglis Australian Easter Yearling Sale day two when selling for AUS$1,500,000 / Inglis (p)

INGLIS AUSTRALIAN EASTER YEARLING SALE

Newmarket, Sydney, Australia

8-10 April 2014

After days of rainy and dank weather in the Sydney area, the clearing skies offered the faithful at the Inglis Australian Easter Yearling Sale some respite from the elements. However, the climate in the sale’s arena appeared a little milder than the previous day. At the end of Day 2, two yearlings broke through the seven figure mark, while four surpassed the mark during Tuesday’s initial session.

Session-two turnover was A$28,755,000 for 122 sold (77% clearance rate) Wednesday, while the average declined to A$241,181, a precipitous fall from the session average of $A314,781 in 2013, though that was boosted by the sale of a A$4-million horse. Overall gross for the first two sessions closed at A$68,115,000, while the average stood at A$256,071.

Despite yesterday’s falling figures, officials remained upbeat about the results, largely given the absence of breakout from the 2013 renewal of the sale.

“In terms of the sale where it is sitting at the moment, I am pleased with the 80% clearance rate as a running tally, and the running tally of the average is also pleasing,” said Inglis Managing Director Mark Webster. “The end results are going to look quite respectable, and we will get there and have quite decent results.”

From the other side of the fence of buyer and seller, Arrowfield’s Jon Freyer felt the trade was fair, despite the deceptively negative figures. “I think the horses made their money, quite honestly,” he said. “Last year was skewed because of those two high-priced horses. Tuesday was slightly better on the first day on pedigrees and individuals, but that was just a chance. I think when you revisit the values post sale, people will say there was value. Speaking to buyers today, it was hard to buy today. So, I don’t think it was as bad as it looked.”

The highest-priced yearling during Wednesday’s round of bidding was Lot 224, a colt by Street Cry (Ire) out of the unraced mare Star On High (Fusaichi Pegasus). Emirates Park and Sheikh Mohammed bin Khalifa Al Maktoum joined forces to secure the bay for A$1.5-million from the Three Bridges Consignment.

Inglis Australian Easter Yearling Sale

Wednesday 9 April 2014

Top Lots

Lot

Sex

Sire

Dam

Vendor

Purchaser

Price AUS$

224

C

Street Cry (Ire)

Star On High (USA)

Three Bridges Thoroughbreds

Emirates Park / Sheikh Mohammed bin Khalifa Al Maktoum

1,500,000

307

C

Exceed and Excel (Aus)

Allegra (Aus)

Kia-Ora Stud

George Moore Bloodstock

1,000,000

266

C

More Than Ready (USA)

Unspoken Choice (Aus)

Vinery Stud

John Warren Bloodstock / China Horse Club

800,000

194

F

Fastnet Rock (Aus)

Scattered (Aus)

Highgrove Stud

Spendthrift Farm

650,000

274

F

Redoute’s Choice (Aus)

Vormista (Aus)

Kitchwin Hills

Shadwell Australasia

600,000

282

C

Redoute’s Choice (Aus)

Wiener (Aus)

Kitchwin Hills

Gai Waterhouse / James Harron Bloodstock

600,000

Extract from Thoroughbred Daily News

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INGLIS AUSTRALIAN EASTER YEARLING SALE KICKS INTO GEAR

inglis australian easter yearling sale
inglis australian easter yearling sale

Lot 149 - Fastnet Rock x Perfect Persuasion colt that topped the opening day of the 2014 Inglis Australian Easter Yearling Sale

when selling to John Warren for $1,600,000 / Inglis (p)

INGLIS AUSTRALIAN EASTER YEARLING SALE

Newmarket, Sydney, Australia

8-10 April 2014

After a somewhat spotty beginning to Tuesday’s opening session of the Inglis Australian Easter Yearling Sale in Sydney yesterday, the action kicked into high gear later in the session when a pair of yearlings headed the day, bringing A$1.6 million and A$1.5 million. While yesterday’s action failed to achieve the heights of 2013 when a pair of youngsters brought A$4 million and A$5 million, respectively, the day did produce the kind of fireworks that has come to be expected at the Newmarket complex in April. Sales officials freely admitted that this year’s auction lacked some of the firepower of last year’s version, and, not surprisingly, yesterday’s initial session observed across-the-board decreases in gross (down 10% to A$34,815,000) and average (decreasing 8% to A$280,766. The median remained steady at A$200,000 while the clearance rate was slightly better than last year’s opener. Additionally, the number of yearlings exceeding the A$1-million mark fell from nine 12 months ago to four this season.

“I am happy with the results today in a sense that the average is quite strong, particularly when we take out the A$5 million lot from last year,” said Inglis Managing Director Mark Webster. “The average at the end of Day 1 last year was A$305,000, and if you take him out of the equation, we are still up at A$280,000, so it is quite good and up on four or five years ago. Clearly, it is still a selective market and the clearance rate at 74% is just fair, and I would like to see that improve. Having said that, at the end of Day 1 last year, it was 73%, so it is marginally ahead of last year. I have no doubt that will improve as we sell horses privately and we have a real chance of getting to 80% at the end of the sale.”

Playing the role of both buyer and consignor Tuesday, Coolmore’s Tom Magnier said, “The sale took a little time to get going, but there are some lovely types and all the right people are here, so I’d say it’s going to be a good week.”

Extract from Thoroughbred Daily News

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ZARKAVA FOALS COLT BY REDOUTE'S CHOICE

redoute's choice stallion
redoute's choice stallion

Redoute’s Choice / Arrowfield (p)

“A very elegant colt that is correct and strong” - Georges Rimaud

Champion mare Zarkava (Zamindar) gave birth on Monday morning to a handsome colt by Haras de Bonneval resident Redoute’s Choice. The foal is described by Georges Rimaud, manager of the Aga Khan Studs in France, as: “a very elegant colt that is correct and strong”. Zarkava is now due to visit Frankel.

Redoute’s Choice, currently third leading sire in Australia behind his own son Snitzel, will cover a high-class book of mares this year, including 18 representatives of the Aga Khan Studs. These feature the dam of Gr.1 Prix de Diane heroine Valyra (Azamour), Valima, as well as the dam of Gr.1 winner Bayrir, Balankiya who is currently in foal to Gilltown Stud sire Sea The Stars. Gr.1 winners Rosanara, Shalanaya, Daryakana and Mandesha, as well a sister to Classic sire Azamour add to the prestigious list of mares for the dual Champion sire.

The Aga Khan Studs have made a successful start to the foaling season, with a number of other blue-blooded foals already on the ground.

Sichilla (Danehill) has given birth to a colt by Sea The Stars. She is the dam of young stallion Siyouni (Pivotal), who is fully booked for the fourth consecutive season at Bonneval. The first two-year-olds by this winner of the Gr.1 Prix Jean-Luc Lagardère are eagerly awaited on the racetrack this year.

Gr.3 winner Baliyana (Dalakhani), dam of promising Gr.1 1,000 Guineas entry Balansiya (Shamardal), foaled a Rock Of Gibraltar filly and will now be visiting Sea The Stars.

Last year’s Gr.1 Prix de l’Opéra victrix Dalkala is set to be covered by Dubawi. 2012 Gr.1 winner Ridasiyna (Motivator) and Gr.1-placed Sarkiyla (Oasis Dream) have both travelled to the USA to be covered by War Front and Street Cry respectively.

Extract from European Bloodstock News

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RECORD DEMAND AT MELBOURNE PREMIERE YEARLING SALE

inglis melbourne premier yearling sale day 3
inglis melbourne premier yearling sale day 3

Lot 554 Magnus - Silverbeat / EBN (p)

INGLIS MELBOURNE PREMIERE YEARLING SALE

2-5 March 2014

Record demand for yearlings continued on Day Three of the 2014 Inglis Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale with the Session One average price rising for the fifth consecutive year.

“The last time this sale averaged in the $80,000s was when Black Caviar, Starspangledbanner and Reward For Effort went through the ring. It would certainly be great for this week’s buyers to be rewarded with such outstanding racetrack success as those sold that year. It’s is a credit to our vendors that have contributed to increased clearance rate, average and median,” said Inglis Melbourne Bloodstock Director Peter Heagney.

441 Yearlings have been sold at an average of $84,115, a 10% increase from 2013. The clearance rate is also well up on last year’s figure to a strong 81%.

The $70,000 median is an all-time record for the Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale.

62 Lots have been sold for $150,000 or more in Session One, a significant increase from 44 last year.

Dean Hawthorne pushed his way to the top of the buyers list by securing three lots today including Lot 554, a well related filly by Magnus out of Silverbeat, for $240,000 from Yallambee Stud. Hawthorne finished Session One with nine yearlings for $1,198,000.

David Hayes’ Lindsay Park Racing has been very active at the sale buying 10 yearlings for $1,150,000. Other trainers to secure five or more yearlings so far include Mick Price, Michael Moroney, Clinton McDonald, Robbie Griffiths, Simon Miller, Peter Moody, Tony McEvoy and Leon Macdonald.

Australian’s have had plenty of competition from active international buyers from South Africa, Ireland, United Kingdom, New Zealand, Malaysia, Singapore, Macau, Korea, China, Hong Kong and Japan at the sale.

Northern Meteor has topped the sires list with five of his yearlings selling at an average of $198,000. Other leading sires by average were Fastnet Rock (7 at $185,000), Magnus (3 at $176,667), Exceed And Excel (7 at $172,143) and Lonhro (9 at 138,889).

Equiano has led the first season sires with 15 of his yearlings selling at an amazing average of $105,200. Yearlings by Beneteau, Shocking, Star Witness, Hinchinbrook, Stryker, Lope de Vega and Reward For Effort also averaged more than $75,000.

Eliza Park International has jumped to the top of the leading vendors list at the sale having sold 32 yearlings for $2,887,500. Yallambee Stud averaged $118,684 for their 19 yearlings sold giving them an aggregate of $2,255,000.

Woodside Park Stud have had a tremendous sale selling all six lots offered at an average of $202,500. Blue Gum Farm, Coolmore Stud and Gilgai Farm sold all 44 lots the trio offered between them, a remarkable selling effort.

Extract from Inglis Bloodstock

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STRONG TRADE AT MELBOURNE PREMIERE YEARLING SALE DAY 2

Inglis Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale Day 2 Top Lot
Inglis Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale Day 2 Top Lot

Lot 297 Equiano - Hidden Energy / EBN (p)

INGLIS MELBOURNE PREMIERE YEARLING SALE

2-5 March 2014

Strong trade for solid horses was again the feature on day two of the Inglis Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale, with the gains seen on day one continuing, writes Stephen Heath for the European Bloodstock News.

Once again the average remained around A$88,000 which was up 10% on last year, while the clearance rate of 80% was also up, from 75% twelve months ago. This was the second time that Inglis have put on a “Blue Riband” section, which features yearlings who are bred along staying lines, and this again proved a hit with the buyers.

“Buyers from Macau, New Zealand, South Africa, Malaysia, Singapore, China and all across Australia purchased one or more Blue Riband yearlings, which is a great endorsement for the concept and the quality product that vendors are bringing to the Premier,” said Inglis Melbourne Bloodstock Director Peter Heagney.

It was a shuttle stallion from Europe who provided the top price of the day, with Newsells Park Stud’s Equiano, who stands at Victoria-based Swettenham Stud when in the Southern Hemisphere, responsible for Lot 297. Swettenham Stud also consigned the colt, who was knocked down to the Malaysian-based Tan Sri Vincent Tan for A$420,000. The strapping colt was one of the most paraded yearlings at Oaklands last week and that led to exceptional interest in the sale ring. Numerous bidders were active for him and his final price was the highest ever paid for a yearling by a first season sire in Victoria.

“It is pleasing to see that so many Australian and international buyers have taking a liking to the physical make up of Equiano’s stock here in Melbourne. Many people remember his power defeating Takeover Target at Royal Ascot and it is that physicality that is so evident in the constitution of his yearlings,” pointed out Adam Sangster of Swettenham Stud.

The colt is out of the Dehere mare Hidden Energy, who was Gr.1-placed in the Robert Sangster Stakes. This is her second foal and it is a family that has seen good updates recently. Hidden Energy is herself out of Gr.1 Winfield Classic winner Kapchat (Centaine), also responsible for Gr.3 winner Kaphero (Danzero). In recent weeks, this has been the family of Gr.3 winners Solicit (Street Cry) and Nayeli (More Than Ready), both of whom look like making an impact at Gr.1 level in future.

INGLIS MELBOURNE PREMIER YEARLING SALE

DAY TWO TOP LOTS

Lot

Sex

Sire - Dam

Vendor

Purchaser

Price AUS$

297

C

EQUIANO - Hidden Energy

Swettenham Stud

Tan Sri Vincent Tan

420,000

250

C

ENCOSTA DE LAGO - Special Episode

Woodside Park Stud

Penang Turf Club

360,000

252

C

FASTNET ROCK - True Seduction

Woodside Park Stud

D Hawthorne / P Morgan

310,000

225

C

NEW APPROACH - Entrust

Blue Gum Farm

Nordic Racing & Breeding

300,000

333

F

EXCEED AND EXCEL - La Guichet

Rothwell Park

Glen Harvey B/S

270,000

248

C

SAVABEEL - Senorita Lucy

Rosemont Stud

Rosemont Stud

260,000

382

C

LONHRO - Mermaid Island

Tyreel Stud

Tyreel Stud

245,000

Extract from European Bloodstock News

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BLACK CAVIAR BROTHER EUTHANISED

Lot 131 Inglis Easter Yearling Sale
Lot 131 Inglis Easter Yearling Sale

Watch Jimmy, Redoutes’s Choice half brother to Black Caviar, on parade at the Inglis Easter Yearling Sale

(Image and footage : Thoroughbred News)

“At approximately 11 a.m. this morning the Redoute’s Choice - Helsinge 2-year-old colt known as Jimmy was euthanized on humane grounds at the Melbourne University Veterinary Hospital in Werribee Victoria.” - Mark Webster Inglis CEO

The Redoute’s Choice (Aus) 2-year-old half-brother to superstars Black Caviar (Aus) and All Too Hard (Aus), purchased for an Australian yearling record of A$5 million at Inglis Easter and affectionately known as ‘Jimmy,’ was euthanized yesterday at the Melbourne University Veterinary Hospital in Werribee, Victoria. The colt had developed laminitis that is believed to have stemmed from an adverse reaction to antibiotics used to treat a spider bite in November.

Jimmy was purchased by BC3 Thoroughbreds at Easter earlier this year, however the sale company held security over the colt as a result of BC3’s failure to pay for him. BC3 Thoroughbreds crumbled just weeks ago after its CEO Bill Vlahos resigned amidst bankruptcy and multi-million dollar charges stemming from member losses from a punting club he operated.

Inglis CEO Mark Webster revealed the news this morning on his blog, stating: “As a lover of all horses, but in particular the magnificent Thoroughbred, it is with a heavy heart that I write this post. At approximately 11 a.m. this morning the Redoute’s Choice - Helsinge 2-year-old colt known as Jimmy was euthanized on humane grounds at the Melbourne University Veterinary Hospital in Werribee Victoria. Jimmy was suffering from laminitis, a painful hoof condition that impacts on the mobility of horses. It is believed the laminitis developed after suffering an adverse reaction to antibiotics, which were being used to treat his swollen leg when admitted to the Hospital in early November. Jimmy became a household name after setting a new record price as yearling at the 2013 Inglis Easter Yearling Sale, reaching $5 million to the bid of BC3 Thoroughbreds. As the younger sibling to Champions Black Caviar and All Too Hard [Aus], we all had great expectations for Jimmy on the track and in the breeding barn. This is a very sad outcome for all involved. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of the staff at the Werribee Hospital for their dedicated care, in particular to Dr Chris Whitton and his colleagues who monitored Jimmy throughout the Christmas period.”

Jimmy is out of the 12-year-old Helsinge (Aus) (Desert Sun {GB}) who, in addition to producing world champion sprinter Black Caviar, is also the dam of four-time Group 1 winner All Too Hard. Helsinge’s 3-year-old filly, Belle Couture (Aus) (Redoute’s Choice {Aus}), purchased by BC3 for A$2.6 million at the 2012 Inglis Easter Sale, finished a narrow second on debut at Bendigo in Victoria a week ago.

Extracts from Thoroughbred Daily News

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WORLD WAR III

coolmore vs darley
coolmore vs darley

“In a game in which the principals all compete in the same profession, and where success and failure are both logged in the press every day, swirling envies always abound.”

For those of us who think that excellence in the racehorse breeding business, is vitally dependent upon the regular refreshment of one’s productive bloodstock, the annual retirement to stud of the world’s top performers is a matter of fundamental interest. For as long as we continue to believe that imported parent stock is superior to our local stuff, what happens in the Northern Hemisphere will remain the focus of our greater attention. After all, it has been thus ever since South Africans took breeding seriously, and the future fathers of our own prospects will be drawn from the ranks of the stallions that excel in those realms.

The bells of success have forever tolled for those that command the heights of the stallion business, and for close on three centuries, that hegemony rested with the English aristocracy, endowed as they were with the spoils of Empire. The curtain-call on Britain’s dominion over 40% of the earth’s surface, coincided with the rampant American economy of the 1940s, and the irresistible money of the latter’s industrialists soon transferred the pendulum of stallion power to the other side of the Atlantic.

Enter the son of a battling Irish farmer and his utterly gifted father-in-law trainer, backed by the riches of a football pools heir, and the 1980s spawned the emergence of a new force in the Emerald Isle. Given the economics of the time, Ireland was the most unlikely of places to champion a European resurgence, but when it comes to horses, only the ignorant would be foolish enough to ignore her horsemen.

John Magnier, Vincent O’Brien and the Liverpudlian Robert Sangster brought a new meaning to the word “genius,” and while knowing that the best racehorse (and hence, stallion) prospects were to be found in North America was, for them, the easy part, their knack in picking and funding the choice lots was what set them apart. Thus Coolmore was born, a temple to the glories of Vincent O’Brien’s masterpiece, Ballydoyle, the mysteries of which had fired the pens of journalists for five full decades.

The Japanese have long been the masters of imitation, so it wasn’t long before their own “genius”, the late Zenya Yoshida, cottoned on and developed a dominance of his own in his homeland, perfecting it by urging his domestic authorities to rewrite their racing programme to suit the discards of a European model which had served British and French racing so well for so long.

But back to centre court. Within a decade, the Irish-based triumvirate faced an onslaught from a hitherto unimaginable source with limitless pockets. Oil was the new world monetary system, and with their exposure to the intoxication of racing that comes with an aristocratic British education, the four sons of Dubai’s ruler of the time, succumbed to the charms of the sport. Magnier and Co. suddenly had a match on their hands, and before they could say “Jack Flash”, the Arab connection were the senior protagonists, if only from the perspective of what they could spend not only in the United States, but in their pursuit of the best produce of the best stallions already enthroned at Coolmore.

What has become of a rivalry that grew out of the internecine battle for racing supremacy in Europe, has been well-visited in these columns. In a nutshell, the balance of power at the racecourse ping-ponged between these two battalions, the one propelled by what seemed like a “bottomless pit”, the other by the instincts that belong only to those whose talents spring from generations of association with horses. Yes, measured by the standards of a former era, the Irish contingent had “cash”, but the resources at the disposal of Sheikh Mohammed et frère were on a scale no-one had seen or even contemplated before. The fact that the Irish were competitive at all, is the best testimony to our home-coined adage that when it comes to racehorses, a good eye can be just as good as a big cheque book.

In a game in which the principals all compete in the same profession, and where success and failure are both logged in the press every day, swirling envies always abound. The Arabs obviously had their reasons (the grapevine suggested they felt that the flow of the financial largesse accruing from their “mutual” patronage, was pretty much one-way traffic in favour of the “green” team) but out of the blue, the Maktoums decided about 8 years ago, that they would henceforth suspend their support of the Coolmore stallions, as well as their progeny in the sales ring. As the biggest buyers of thoroughbreds the world had known, in almost every other conceivable instance, this would’ve been the death knell for any operation, even one of Coolmore’s scale. After all, it didn’t only mean the withdrawal of their patronage of the stallions themselves, but it was a signal to all commercial breeders who continued their support of the Magnier stallions, that they could no longer count on Maktoum money to drive their prices. In short, it was a declaration of war, a war which has raged on for 8 unrelenting years, at considerable cost to the “boys in blue”, as the Maktoum contingent has come to be known.

It is one of the truisms of the game, that owners can be harder to train than horses, and when money and horses start to run, avarice and resentment are often not far behind. Ever since horses became a currency of their own, nothing has been quite the same. History has always served as a good teacher in circumstances like these, and for anyone plotting a strategy, a glance at the stallion logs of the moment would’ve made worthwhile reading. Sadler’s Wells had already racked up a world record sequence of 12 sires titles (he made it 14 in the end;) on either side of these, the Coolmore stallions, Caerleon and Danehill had their turns (Danehill was on the threshold of a “run” of his own, too,) and the European “top ten” seldom included fewer than seven or eight Coolmore incumbents. If you wanted to remain in the vanguard of European racing, the quick answer was that you had to stay with the Coolmore stallions. The Maktoums didn’t, and since that day, their challenge has “fizzled” to a trickle of its former formidable glory. That’s not going to change any time soon either, not until they “own the farm”.

Meanwhile, already ensconced at Coolmore were the successors to Sadler’s Wells; Danehill, his son Danehill Dancer, Montjeu and High Chaparral, aspiring champions the lot, as well as the inimitable Galileo, most people’s idea of the world’s best sire of the present era. To a man, they are products of a single lineage, the genesis of which lay in the early recognition of Northern Dancer as the “daddy of them all”, long before the rest of the world woke up. By contrast, the very ample ranks of Darley stallions in Europe, are populated by just a handful of quality proven stallions: Dubawi (a son of their own prematurely-deceased Dubai Millennium), Shamardal and New Approach, ironically the products of two Coolmore-owned horses, Giant’s Causeway and Galileo. In a sense, this is akin to “sleeping with the enemy”, and only serves to highlight the cost of that fateful decision to an operation whose ratio vivendi is centred entirely on the frequency of its visits to the big race winner’s podium, and blighted this year by two very unwelcome but much publicised charges for the possession and administration of quantities of illegal medications.

The one thing you can’t do though, is underestimate the ambition and determination of Dubai’s ruler: what Sheikh Mohammed wants, Sheikh Mohammed gets. In the wake of the “declaration of war”, he set out to corner the American stallion market by acquiring the top four performers of the three-year-old generation of 2007; together with his exceptional homebred, Bernardini, a cool $200 million laid claim to the Kentucky Derby star, Street Sense, Hard Spun and Any Given Saturday. Then he reached into a rich vein of genetic quartz, and brought home the exalted sire, Medaglia D’Oro. While the reigning champion of America, Giant’s Causeway (three titles 2009, 2010 and 2012) resides at Coolmore’s Ashford operation, Bernardini looks every bit the successor to his own illustrious father, A.P. Indy, and Medaglia D’Oro remains a force, though not with quite the zest he enjoyed at the height of his “heady” acquisition.

If the penny hasn’t already dropped, this is the background to the world of stallion supremacy, and why, in that battle, the only two parties that matter (in the Northern Hemisphere at least) if only because of the financial and genetic resources at their disposal, are Coolmore and Darley. Yes, there are pockets of genuine resistance (Juddmonte’sDansili and Oasis Dream and the immense but as yet unknown presence of Frankel) Claiborne’s War Front (Danzig’s successor, they say) and down South, the exceptional influences of Redoute’s Choice and, can-you-believe-it, another continental champion for Coolmore, Fastnet Rock. But the reality is, for the foreseeable future at least, these two leviathans of the industry, as diverse in their character as a lion and a hippopotamus, are likely to define the course of things.

Just four years ago (a few months after the fall of Lehmann Bros.) American studs announced the fees for their top new retirees: Curlin ($75,000), Big Brown ($65,000) and Henrythenavigator ($65,000). Since then, only four Northern Hemisphere stallions have stood for $50,000 or more, all in Europe, and two of them veteran “Australians”: Fastnet Rock, shuttling at an “opener” of €35,000 (+-$50k), and in an act of unusual daring most likely engineered by his own bloodstock chief, Georges Rimaud, the Aga Khan took on Redoute’s Choice at €70,000. The other two, arguably the two best European racehorses of the past 30 years, reinforced both the Aga Khan’s new-found entreprenurial verve as well as Prince Khalid Abdullah’s place at the main table of international breeding’s greatest players. Sea The Stars retired to Gilltown Stud for €85 000, while Frankel joined the Juddmonte roster at £125 000. Most betting men will tell you, the Europeans got the best end of that bargain, and looking at the prospects for 2014, it’s another case of “odds-on” Europe.

Top of the European “pops”, at least from a pricing perspective, is Coolmore’s aptly named Declaration Of War, given the theme of this report, who comes at a solid €40,000 (+-$55,000). Coolmore have obviously identified his sire War Front, as the reincarnation of his own father, Danzig, and as a font of future prospects, as they’ve done a fistful of business with that stallion’s principal Joseph Allen, and this fellow combines a “Giant’s Causeway” constitution and mind, with an enviable “milers” record for his place at the top of the stud fee tree.

It is a sad reflection though, on the role which fashion plays in the setting of stud fees, that as admirable a racehorse as Camelot should kick off at just €25,000. It is all the more mystifying since his own sire Montjeu, Galileo and High Chaparral, all giants of the stallion firmament, were like him, Derby winners. His “sin” obviously rests in the extended distances at which he excelled, while Dawn Approach, who like Camelot, was also a winner of the Group One Two Thousand Guineas at a mile, starts life at €35,000. Dawn Approach’s redemption rests in the fact that, unlike our Derby hero, he failed in the Derby, suggesting that his forte’ was at the shorter trips. Damn good miler that he was, there wasn’t €10,000 worth of stud fees between him and Camelot as racehorses. End of story.

Besides having displayed his prowess in Group One company at a mile, Camelot had the added distinction of crushing his Derby adversaries by five, in faster time than any of his mighty Ballydoyle predecessors, Nijinsky, Sir Ivor, Roberto, The Minstrel and High Chaparral, all stellar stallions in their own right. Here was an athlete with the precocity of a Champion Two-Year-Old, the speed to win a Guineas at three, and whose owners were the first since Nijinsky’s Charles Engelhard with the courage and the enterprise to allow a colt of his talents a crack at the Triple Crown. His pedigree spoke of “Elegance” and the “Enforcer”: by Montjeu from a Kingmambo mare, out of a daughter of Danehill, Camelot had done exactly what it said on the “tin”. When it came to the extended trip of the St Leger, the third leg in the “crown”, things just unravelled. One of the brutal truths of the game, is that when things seem almost too good to be true, they almost certainly are. All seemed so well in the world. It only took one race to change it.  And, it only took a horse called Encke, who’s not been seen or heard of since, to do it. That was Camelot’s sin.

Mercifully, the Coolmore team knows better. While Declaration Of War heads their freshman roster pricewise, it is Camelot’s honour to decorate the cover of their newly-released stallion brochure for 2014.

Dawn Approach aside (enigmatic he may be, but on his day, a world class performer with a big shot at Darley,) we’re not departing Europe without a word about Al Kazeem, recently syndicated among the “who’s who” of European breders for duty at The Queen’sSandringham Stud. The son of Sheikh Mohammed’s highly accomplished Dubawi, this debonair entertainer debuts at a fee of £18,000 (+-$30,000). Horses like Al Kazeem are an inspiration. In the simplest way, they symbolise the highest of athletic virtues, rock solid minds and massive physical appeal. It is always dangerous to get too anthropomorphic about horses, but given the calibre of those who’ve invested in him, there’s always mystique in the thought of how such a tough character will fare when he moves to the sultan’s life at stud.

The profiles of American debutants for 2014, is somewhat lower than that of their European counterparts, and appears to herald a subtle fall from grace of Kentucky, not long ago the undisputed capital of world thoroughbred breeding. Nice enough horses they certainly are, but in Orb, Paynter, Point Of Entry, Oxbow, Shanghai Bobby and Take Charge Indy, there’s little among those names to shiver the timbers of European breeders. The one horse who might’ve stirred some emotions across the waves were it not for his “non-event” at Ascot, is Animal Kingdom, the Kentucky Derby ace who, for a stretch of three months earlier in the year, bestrode the world as its highest-rated middle distance performer. He opens at Darley for a mouth-watering $35,000.

Hot off a nail-biting second in the 2012 Breeder’s Cup Mile, Animal Kingdom carried the colours of his breeders, Team Valor to victories in a brace of Group Ones in the opening months of the year, including a crushing defeat of an international line-up in the $10 million Dubai World Cup. South Africa’s Robin Bruss has previously engineered international transactions involving major racehorses and stallions, and one of his more celebrated achievements was the acquisition of the former Chilean champion sire, Hussonet, for duty at John Messara’s fabled Arrowfield in Australia.

Here Bruss was again, coupling Team Valor’s Barry Irwin with Arrowfield in a deal that saw Animal Kingdom go to “post” for the world’s richest race, in their joint ownership. A visionary in the Magnier class, Messara has always been pretty nimble when there is business to be done, especially when a “shrewdy” like Irwin has marked his card. Animal Kingdom’s World Cup was one of those moments when triumph is so complete, vindication so unarguable.

As he’d also demonstrated so often in the past, Sheikh Mohammed is seldom too far out of range when there’s the scent of a good horse in the vicinity, and he too, was quick to pounce in the World Cup aftermath. Few horses have gone to Royal Ascot with such expectations, and with the combined powers of two of the world’s great marketers and the money of one of the world’s richest men behind him, Animal Kingdom arrived in England carrying the aspirations of three different countries. The racehorse is such a symbol of hope and vitality though, that when they go down, as Animal Kingdom did before the eyes of the world at Ascot, the flame is so instantly extinguished, it comes as a choking shock, even in the remembrance. Otherwise, he should’ve been standing for $50,000 or more.

One race: that’s all it takes. Success governs everything in racing. It always has. And it always will.

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IT'S A BREEZE

Visionaire Stallion
Visionaire Stallion

Visionaire

(Photo : Jay Gilbert)

“The Visionaires aren’t just winning: they’re ‘blasting’”

Visionaire is a man who’s been making the headlines lately with his first runners in the United States. For those of us whose mares are carrying his foals right now, there’s been more encouraging news. One of his earlier winners, Bacopa Breeze (who broke his duck by 11 lengths a few weeks back) breezed up again this week, charging home by 8.5 lengths. The Visionaires aren’t just winning: they’re “blasting”, which has got to be the best news for a stallion line-up that is higher on potential than it’s ever been, but which is looking for a man whose proven record says we can lay our lives on him.

On that topic, those who follow our Facebook page and the Sporting Post, will know the drama the first progeny of Golden Sword are creating in these parts. When we arrived at the foaling unit yesterday morning for a preview of Judge Magid’s stock on the farm, we were greeted with yet another “pearler” from Africa’s most accomplished son of High Chaparral: a 65 kg “monster” from Sheikh Mohammed’s well-related mare, Crescent Star. The Sadler’s Wells tribe is not known for its size or its substance particularly, but from what we’re hearing from the boys at Coolmore Australia about the first “So You Thinks”, it seems that High Chaparral himself may have spawned an entirely unique Sadler’s Wells type. Golden Sword is much in the mould of his father, a leggy, athletic high quality individual, in the style of the European classic horse, but mated to the sort of “colonial” mares High Chaparral would’ve been crossed with in Australasia, there seems to be more body, more size and more bone to his issue.

That probably explains why, despite his great successes in the Northern Hemisphere, High Chaparral has outperformed even those with four Group One winners in Australia in his first crop, and a Triple Crown hero in the second. On Saturday, It’s a Dundeel followed up his exploits in the Triple Crown with a stunning victory in the Underwood Stakes (Gr.1), his fifth Group One in twelve months, and in the process he brought to an end an unbeaten run of eight consecutive victories for Australia’s “darling of the turf,” Atlantic Jewel. It was a bittersweet outcome for Coolmore, who own the daughter of Fastnet Rock, but who’ll be consoled by the fact that at $77,000 this year (nigh on R800,000), they seem to have got High Chaparral’s stud fee for the present season, spot on.

Within 24 hours of his victory, Arrowfield’s chairman, John Messara, announced that It’s A Dundeel would become a barn-mate of Redoute’s Choice, Snitzel and Animal Kingdom next season. “It’s A Dundeel’s pedigree combines the brilliance and classic stamina of Sadler’s Wells and Zabeel, infused with the incomparable speed of Luskin Star, to create a racehorse of superlative quality over a range of distances. It’s A Dundeel’s Underwood success highlights both his weight-for-age class and the turn of foot he had previously demonstrated in his emphatic seven-length victory in the Rosehill Guineas. He is indeed the real deal.”

summerhill stud, south africa
summerhill stud, south africa

Enquiries :

Linda Norval 27 (0) 33 263 1081

or email linda@summerhill.co.za

www.summerhill.co.za

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LEGENDS : PART FOUR

Betty and Colin Hayes
Betty and Colin Hayes

Betty and Colin Hayes

(Photo : Adelaide Now)

“Bred by a legend, consigned by a legend,

bought by a legend, to be trained by a legend.”

mick goss
mick goss

Mick Goss

Summerhill CEOThe turf’s literature is loaded with stories of famous stallions and their sweet ways. Hyperion liked to stop and look at birds. In his latter years, Nijinsky was struck with lymphangitis: his hind legs were swollen so that you could see the pink skin showing through the white hairs above his hooves, yet the light still burned brightly in his eyes; he refused to play the invalid. Northern Guest was a cripple, yet he commanded the attention of our management team on the stud office verandah whenever he passed in the mornings. “Legend” is an overplayed word in the sporting world today, but here was the real thing.

Sir Tristram didn’t belong to this band: he didn’t look the part. He looked like a 100 other horses you’d see and most of them were geldings. He didn’t act the part either, his only friend was an old cat. He was not the stuff of warm inner glow. When I saw him, his hooves had long ago given up, and his feet were being held together with Equilox. Sir Tristram was great not for what he was, but for what he could do. I knew that as soon as I left Cambridge, slightly bewildered, after my first visit in the late afternoon sun. Before long though, I remembered that most colts and fillies by Sir Tristram could outrun the car I was driving.

In 1988, Summerhill was an altogether different place. I was desperately trying to scramble a bit of cash together to buy my brother Pat, out of the operation; we hadn’t yet acquired Hartford, and the Maktoums were not yet aboard. The Berlin Wall divided Germany, the protestors hadn’t yet entered Tiananmen Square and the Ayatollah Khomeni was still alive. Nelson Mandela, remember, was still in jail. Ours was a very different world to the rest of the world, and we weren’t sure at first what the outcome would be. I guess, in retrospect, you’d say it was a helluva time in South Africa, and the only certainty was uncertainty. The one thing we had on our side though, was the energy of youth and an appetite for risk. In all fairness, it’s true we had little to lose. And we occasionally bet the farm.

Across the way in New Zealand, a tremor ran through the crowd at the Karaka Yearling sales when Zabeel, then simply Lot 280, the bay colt by Sir Tristram out of Lady Giselle, walked into the ring. The fabled Robert Sangster had bred him, but now the colt carried the brand of our good friends in Oz, the Arrowfield Group, and he was the talk of the sale for days. The tremor had little to do with his breeding; in a select sale like Karaka’s, most pedigrees have something going for them. It had everything to do with word-of-mouth. A grapevine develops at any yearling sale anywhere in the world. Only a handful of horses are pronounced perfect in the chassis as well as the pedigree page. These horses invariably top the sale.

You could tap into the grapevine at the bars in the region of the Sheraton Hotel in Auckland, which roared every night with the optimism of the rest of the world of the 80s. Trainers, businessmen, veterinarians, ex-jockeys, promoters of tax-avoidance schemes and bloodstock agents, were drinking it up, telling beguiling lies, arranging lines of credit and talking about the horses they’d inspected. Some of them, as you can imagine, knew not what they said. Next day, as is always the custom, most would go to the sale, take off their heads, replace them with pumpkins, and buy the wrong horses. Everyone liked Zabeel, particularly the vets. He made $650,000 to the bid of an old mate, Angus Gold, racing manager for Sheikh Hamdan of Dubai, buying him for another legend, Colin Hayes, who trained from his spectacular property, Lindsay Park, in South Australia. Bred by a legend, consigned by a legend, bought by a legend, to be trained by a legend, the blue-blooded colt seemed pre-destined.

Robert Sangster had sold Zabeel’s mother, Lady Giselle, to John Messara’s Arrowfield group in 1986. Messara, the dark-eyed enthusiast whose family had fled Nasser’s Egypt in the 1960s, is remembered for the importation of the great Danehill to Australia. He tells me he was pleased with the price for Zabeel, though as matters turned out, it was only for the time being. A few years later, Messara would lose control of Danehill after a dispute with Coolmore of Ireland. The $14million Danehill realised in the Dutch auction which followed, was scant compensation for a stud in its infancy.

Danehill would go on to reshape the course of Australasian breeding, and his blood courses through the veins of almost half the thoroughbred population of that part of the world these days. “That experience shattered me. It took me two years to get over it. I got very low”, confided Messara. He couldn’t have known it at the time, but Messara had just lost another sire phenomenon by selling Zabeel as a yearling. He must be just about the only man in the 300 year history of thoroughbred racing to have had his hands on two $50 million stallions, and lost them both. But Messara is no ordinary man, and no sooner than his bottom was on Ground Zero than he bounced back with Danzero, the “Slipper” winner who would become champion Juvenile Sire, Flying Spur who would dominate both the all-comers as well as the juvenile sires lists. Better still, Messara would claim the keys to Redoute’s Choice, who’s had his reign as the undisputed king of Australian breeding. And Messara still had Zabeel’s mother, Lady Giselle, who was handled by the Arrowfield staff like some ancient jug unearthed from the valley of the Nile. She lived on oxygen during her last pregnancy.

Colin Hayes and his son David trained Zabeel to win the Australian Guineas and three other good races. He was a sweet mover, described by Hayes as “poetry in motion”, all style and rhythm. And he was tough, he’d slug out a finish, yet he was never “box office”. He lived in the era of Better Loosen Up, Vo Rogue and Super Impose, and he didn’t enjoy their billing. A jarred leg led to his retirement, and the Sheikh put him up for private sale as a stallion amid the recession. Patrick Hogan had kept a beady eye on Zabeel’s career, with rising interest. He knew plenty about the horse anyway, and he knew that Zabeel should’ve been born in 1985, not 1986. Sangster sent Lady Giselle to Cambridge to be mated with Sir Tristram in 1984. She was a well-bred French mare by Northern Dancer’s son Nureyev. That’s what the piece of paper said. The physical reality was less grand. Lady Giselle was a twin, tiny, light-boned, faulty in the knees; a high-bred waif. When I first saw her at Arrowfield, I’d have to agree; I walked right past her, without noticing.

Hogan had decided to wait until Sir Tristram was 20 before standing one of his sons as a competitor. “Only then did I decide to give it a go. It would’ve been an insult not to have stood one of his sons, but I was leaving my run late. When the time comes, I might not be able to find the right one”. In Zabeel, Hogan liked what he saw, but he was reassured by insiders that when the time came for his retirement, he was bound to land up at Hayes’ Lindsay Park. When he won the Guineas at Flemington, Hogan just kept hanging in, he’d been earmarked by now, and he was the one. But there was a problem: Hogan didn’t want to offend Hayes. “I liked to model myself on him. We’re good friends”. We know the feeling: it was the same with National Emblem and Wilfred Koster.

In March 1991, Hogan was at the Gold Coast for a mare sale. Angus Gold was out from London and expressed his surprise that Hogan had shown little interest in Zabeel. “The boss is taking offers for him, so if you want a ticket in the sweep, we’ll be closing in the next couple of days”. Hogan submitted a formal offer of $750,000 through an agent. Next day, Gold confirmed the boss had accepted it. That was the easy part.

Hogan now had to speak with Hayes and express his embarrassment. Hayes shook his hand and said “He’s your horse”. He’d wanted Zabeel alright, and made an offer of $700,000. “They allowed me the opportunity of meeting Pat’s offer”, but Hayes was buying out his fellow investors at Lindsay Park at the time, and he didn’t feel he should go out on a limb. Hogan took Zabeel home and syndicated him into 42 shares of $23,000 each. He and his wife, Justine, kept 21. The Sir Tristram saga was in re-run mode, but without the dramas. The difference was, the son was a gentleman, the father was a man-eater. As I’ve mentioned, the only creature he tolerated was a black cat. Staff handling him wore padded hats, and crossed themselves a lot.

Those things apart, the parallels between father and son were uncanny. At his height, Sir Tristram came to be valued at $50 million, and Zabeel must have hit that plus in a more prosperous era. In common, they both commanded the earth in stud fees.

Beyond Sir Tristram’s vices, there was another difference in their produce. Sir Tristram gave his stock a prominent eye: otherwise they came in all shapes and colours. Zabeel’s foals looked alike, probably because of the influence of Lady Giselle’s father, Nureyev. All are bays, most have good heads, bright eyes, lots of rein, and long bodies. They don’t carry much flesh, run up light in the flanks and hum with nervous energy. They don’t fill out until they’re four, and they’re tough.

As you may have expected, Zabeel’s first crop sold well. Though he was immature, the black colt that would be named Octagonal, sold for $210,000. Soon however, trainers complained that the fillies were fizzy and the colts were difficult. Hogan says that when the second crop reached the ring, the word out there wasn’t that good. He says he didn’t worry, but you might remember me mentioning his dejection at the market for stallion prospects at the time. I had the feeling that Zabeel’s slow start at stud might have had something to do with it. Hogan expected Zabeel’s stock would do best at four, whatever else they might be. Later, he recalled the Melbourne Cup winners Might And Power and Jezabeel as yearlings. The former was a “wee little thing who paddled a leg: Jezabeel was light of flesh and ordinary”. Zabeel had the mark of a great stallion, he threw horses better than himself. So you ask the obvious. Is Zabeel better than Sir Tristram? “Don’t know” said Sir Patrick, “let history be the judge”.

Hogan’s history is like ours. Our forebears came to Africa in 1820 from Ireland: the first of the settlers, with whom I share my first name, Michael Goss, was a labourer who came here as a member of Captain Butler’s party on the good ship, Fanny. While Hogan’s family migrated later, they came from the same part of Ireland, and his father arrived in the land of the “silver cloud” as an 18 year old. He travelled the North island with two Clydesdale stallions, peddling their services before starting a dairy farm in the vicinity of the present Cambridge Stud. Hogan was one of 7 children, from a good Catholic family. “My father had a reputation as a good judge of stock. He raced the odd horse with the local priest”, says Patrick, who left school at 15 to milk cows and feed pigs. “I wasn’t academically inclined, except at arithmetic”. His blue eyes twinkle. “If you’re good at numbers, you’ve got a bit of cunning in you. That way you can think quickly and you have a bit of a chance”. His father’s acquisition of a share in the stallion, Blueskin, was what fired Patrick’s imagination. “My life has always been around animals and farming, and I just like tending and looking after them. Horses and dogs are a man’s best friends”.

He is competitive by nature and admits it. “I want to breed Group One winners, I want to top the yearling sales, I want to beat my competitors”. He’s done all three rather well. He’s sold the highest priced yearling for more than two decades at the New Zealand Yearling sales, and he’s matched that with the highest sales aggregate for as many years. He refused long ago to believe the thoroughbred game was about compulsive “loss-making”. When he bought Sir Tristram in 1976, he owed money on his farm, a lot of it, and it was only a quarter of its present size. He also owed for Sir Tristram. Several decades on, he and Justine might be worth ten figures, but the farmer is never too far away. Many will tell you he’s the best horse salesman the world has known.

Hogan has created a kingdom on 250 hectares of country so rich, it carries five cows to the hectare. It’s not unlike Summerhill: you could be in Tipperary. The black-railed paddocks are bordered with clipped hedges of hawthorn and barberry, and each has a willow and an eight-bar white gate. You approach the main stable block under the dappled light of century old oaks, encrusted with moss and teaming with cicadas.

The centrepiece of the place is Sir Tristram’s headstone, carved from marble Hogan imported from Italy and set in the garden. Pale green butterflies flutter over beds of petunias, violets, roses and begonias. Nearby is a collection of memorabilia. There’s Sir Tristram’s webbing head collar, frayed and encrusted with mud. Here are his mud-splattered shoes, worn and silvery, and there are his two bits, thin and severe. Sir Tristram needed both in his mouth; no-one could control him with one. You can see Hogan enjoys showing you these things: and then he walks back to the grave, because he likes being there even more. One day, that hole could be home to a second knight of the realm.

He has Zabeel these days, but he can’t forget Sir Tristram.

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LEGENDS : PART ONE

Sir Tristram Stallion
Sir Tristram Stallion

Sir Tristram

(Photo : HP Horses)

“Sir Tristram, the stallion which transformed

New Zealand breeding singlehandedly.”

mick goss
mick goss

Mick Goss

Summerhill CEOA couple of years ago, I received an unusual phonecall. It was a lady by the name of Jan McMillan, organiser supreme and convenor of judges of the equestrian division of the Royal Queensland Show. She was inviting me to judge the thoroughbred section, the best endowed competition in the Southern Hemisphere, at what was still, in showing terms, the pride of Australia. Now, I’ve grown up with horses, cattle and sheep, and I like to think I was gifted with a fair eye. It has stood me in good stead in my life, and it was probably a good day for the legal profession (of which I was a fully paid-up member), as well as for my future career, that I decided to give up the law for the horses.

But apart from the odd flirtation on the fringes of agricultural shows, I’d never been in a show ring with horses, let alone judge them. It was a daunting thought, but a challenge nonetheless, and I took it up. My preparations included a couple of rushed lessons in judging with a few local experts, yet I have to confess to climbing aboard the Qantas flight with some trepidation. Uppermost in my thoughts was not only the fear at how the whole thing would turn out, but who could’ve got me into this jam. My first enquiry when I arrived at the showgrounds was to establish who was behind it. The culprit was Patrick Hogan, fabled New Zealand breeder, raconteur and sportsmen, whose contributions to horse breeding had conferred upon him the only knighthood of the realm outside of Britain.

I remember well my first visit to Cambridge Stud. I was reciprocating the visits of numbers of Kiwi breeders, in the company of Rodney Thorpe and Roger Zeeman of Harry’s Charm, Imperial Despatch and Amphitheatre fame. You might remember my companions gained further lustre in their ownership with us of the Horse Of The Year, Igugu. Some of us think we’re lucky to have owned one such beast in our lifetimes, let alone four.

The highlight of any trip to New Zealand is not only the renewal of old friendships, but in those days we were going to see the stallion which had transformed New Zealand breeding singlehandedly, Sir Tristram. By then, he was so hot that breeders were paying up to $200,000 to send a mare to him, and that didn’t include foreplay or candlelight dinners, just the basic rustic encounter. Warren Beatty was rumoured to be sulking.

Behind us, Sir Tristram’s yearlings were being tizzied up for auction in the Karaka ring later in the year. It was the high summer of 1988, not a recession in sight. They would smash all records. One of them, a bay colt, about as right mechanically as a yearling can be, would make $650,000 and leave for Colin Hayes’ training grounds at Lindsay Park in Australia. As Zabeel, he would win $1.1 million on the track, and afterwards, in the breeding shed, he would sire the immortal Octagonal. Also in that draft, a brown colt, a touch backward but with the hard eye of a contender, would make $210,000 to the bid of Dr. Geoff Chapman, the Sydney trainer. As Dr Grace, he would win the Derby at Randwick. There were other good ones in that crop. Sir Tristram got champs the way other stallions got duds. Later in the year, his daughter Empire Rose would win the Melbourne Cup, a second Cup after Gurner’s Lane for Sir Tristram, as well as the Derby heroes Sovereign Red and Grosvenor, and the Golden Slipper winner Marauding. He was the true freak: it doesn’t get any better than this. His stock could stay, they could sprint and they could jump. Inevitably, one of them would throw the javelin. At the time we visited, he must have been worth close to $50 million, but it didn’t matter, because the stallion wasn’t for sale.

Yes, he’d be something to see, and like other famous stallions, you’d expect him to stand like a statue on the lead rein, ears pricked, near foreleg forward, just where the photographers like him to be. And you’d expect his groom would tell you how smart he was, that he liked to read The Wall Street Journal and help old ladies across pedestrian crossings. While he was talking, the stallion wouldn’t acknowledge you, even if you laid a soft hand on his neck. He’d just look out above and beyond. All the good ones are like this, they seem to know they’re a form of royalty.

You arrive at Cambridge Stud, near the town of the same name. It’s some place this. With its portico and walled garden, the long white building in front of you has to be the main house. It turns out to be the stable block. Despite the heat, the clover in the nearby paddocks stands up in lush paddocks, as though Hogan, a perfectionist, has ordered it not to wilt. Stallions are usually brought out of their boxes only after they’ve being groomed and fussed over, after the handlers are assured the forelock is lying flat and that no wisps of straw are caught in the tail. Straight away, you know that this experience is going to be different. “Stand back”, is the first instruction.

The horse is loose in the yard. He comes to you not so much walking, as prowling. There’s a hint of menace as he eyes us off. He holds his head low, like a feral stallion about to enter a harem, so the crest of his neck is exaggerated. Just as well too: without the crest he wouldn’t look like a stallion at all. He’s tall, long, very long and slabby, more like a big gelding whose turned sour after a lifetime’s encounters with whips, tongue ties and blinkers. He’s a bay with a little star on his forehead, his legs are faultless in front, and terrible behind. Dust dulls his coat and his mane is straggly.

And he’s wearing this crummy old halter. Not some leather job that’s triple stitched with wax thread and mounted with brass buckles, the sort you’d expect to see on one of the world’s greatest stallions. This is just plain brown webbing; a 15-buck special, frayed and curling, the sort you’d see on kid’s horses around the city fringes.

Must be his “lucky head stall”, we enquire. “No, we can’t get the bloody thing off”. Now it’s all starting to make sense. The stallion is a man-eater: always has been. Likes to stomp on people, cars and tractors, anything that’s around really. He likes to pick his handlers up by the shoulders and shake them. The only animal he tolerates is a black cat. That’s why he’s seldom led around and groomed. That’s why he’s only caught when he has to be, that’s why the staff when he serves mares, wear helmets and deep padded vests, so that they look like baseball umpires moonlighting at some backwoods mating contest. You just get Sir Tristram to the mare, get him away, and then cross yourself.

When Sir Tristram was finally put down at age 26 after breaking his shoulder, they gave him a proper Christian burial. The priest reportedly said: “If there’s a heaven for horses, he’ll be there”. Quite. For all that, maybe one should tell God that if He’s thinking of leading the old bloke, it might be as well to carry a piece of polypipe.

There’s one curious thing about Sir Tristram. He didn’t pass on his bad temper. And here’s another: most great stallions (and there are only a half dozen or so each century) throw a type, hundreds of look-alikes. Sir Tristram didn’t. His stock came in all shapes, colours and sizes. He did however, have the most important trademark of the modern stallion. He got horses better than he was. Sir Tristram won two ordinary races in France over two seasons. Though he was by the Epsom Derby winner Sir Ivor, he hadn’t done enough at the races, nor was he handsome enough, to stand as a stallion at the studs of Europe or England. New Zealand made Sir Tristram. Banished there, he would sire 42 Group One Stakes winners, a world record at the time.

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PEDIGREE PUZZLES

Dawn Approach - 2000 Guineas
Dawn Approach - 2000 Guineas

Dawn Approach wins the QIPCO 2000 Guineas

(Photo : RTE)

“There is good reason for thinking that Dawn Approach

will not be troubled by a mile and a quarter”

It’s that time of the year again, when streams of conjecture from pedigree pundits pondering the stamina limitations of Classic prospects are the order of the day. The debate rages no more furiously anywhere than it does in the United States, primarily as it’s Kentucky Derby time, and since the bulk of American horses are bred for speed, there’s always the question of whether their stamina will stretch the ten furlongs of their most famous race.

Strangely enough, for a country that has an hereditary obsession with these arguments, the British have been uncharacteristically quiet, more likely because most horses in those realms are bred for the Derby trip, and it’s usually their class that makes them effective at anything less than a mile and a half. Indeed, for a country that was once renowned for the lightning elements of the Grey Sovereign, Gold Boss, Golden Cloud, Vilmorin, Abernant and Mummy’s Pet lines, there is a distinct dearth of out-and-out speed in European pedigrees these days. A top sprinter is more likely to be an errant child from a heritage that screams “stamina”, than he is to have been bred for the job, hence the regular decimation by the Australians of the region’s leading exponents of the art of speed in the King’s Stand Stakes (Gr.1) and the Golden Jubilee Sprint (Gr.1) most years at Royal Ascot.

Saturday’s Two Thousand Guineas (Gr.1) hero, Dawn Approach, has woken the gurus from their slumber however, with his imperious 5 length triumph in the 205th running of England’s first Classic, because his pedigree at least suggests there may be a few chinks in his stamina armoury, and hence his appetite for the Derby distance.

Andrew Caulfield who’s been around a long time, and is one of the world’s leading students on the subject, yesterday provided his dissection of Dawn Approach’s prospects of doing so. As usual, he is delightfully insightful. But most of these fellows have a knack of occupying the top of the fence when it comes to putting their reputations on the line, and Andrew’s left us wondering again. So you be the judge!

Jim Bolger’s outstanding record as a trainer has shown time after time that he is not hidebound by convention. If a horse appears to be ready to run, he is happy to run it, even if other trainers would hesitate because of the animal’s bloodlines. This has been highlighted by the records of the five colts which have taken the Dewhurst Stake (Gr.1) for Bolger over the last seven years, as none of them made his debut later than July 16. Parish Hall was out as early as April 10, despite being inbred 3x3 to Sadler’s Wells, and Saturday’s admirable 2000 Guineas winner Dawn Approach started his career even earlier, on March 25. These early starts also allowed Bolger to give his colts the wealth of experience which often proves so valuable in the top events, with all five racing at least five times at two.

I guess that ungenerous observers might say that some of these colts paid the price for their early exploits, as neither Teofilo (Galileo) nor Parish Hall (Teofilo) was able to race at three and Intense Focus (Giant’s Causeway) ran only twice after his busy first season. However, New Approach proved to be a model Thoroughbred and is now a highly exciting sire, with the unbeaten Dawn Approach leading the way.

Of course the excitement about New Approach started last year, when Dawn Approach’s Coventry Stakes (Gr.2) win was part of an unprecedented stakes treble for a first-crop sire at Royal Ascot, the other victories coming via Thair and the short-lived Newfangled.

While these three proved that New Approach is perfectly capable of siring precocious juveniles, I suspect that they may be exceptions to the rule. No other stakes winners emerged from New Approach’s subsequent 2-year-old runners in 2012, but he notched up his fourth stakes winner when the stoutly bred Talent took the Pretty Polly Stakes (L) two days ago.

As with many a winner of the 2000 Guineas, the question now is whether Dawn Approach has the necessary stamina for the Derby. I might as well admit now that I have my doubts, but I am delighted that Dawn Approach’s connections apparently intend to let him take his chance. Bolger has been an advocate of Equinome’s genetic testing system, designed to evaluate a racehorse’s stamina potential. It seems, though, that he is still prepared to go along with the old trial-and-error process which has stood racing in good stead for hundreds of years.

When Brough Scott interviewed Bolger for Racing Post Sunday in March, Scott explained that the system categorizes a horse’s stamina capabilities, from a TT for middle-distance to a CC for sheer speed. “Galileo was a TT, but he had class,” Bolger explained. “The ideal for a Classic horse is CT. New Approach was a CT, while Dawn Approach is a CC. I trained his dam who had talent, although she got injured, but she was by a sprinter, so the Derby distance is unlikely. But as he settles so well, I would not rule it out entirely.”

It is essential to remember that stamina cannot be accurately assessed without taking temperament into account. A hard-puller is never going to stay as far as expected. Equally, a phlegmatic temperament and a willingness to settle can sometimes allow a horse to stay further than anyone might have predicted. One of the most extreme examples that I can recall was Lord Helpus, a horse trained by Barry Hills nearly 40 years ago. This colt was by Green God, a high-class performer who did all his winning over five or six furlongs. Golden Cloud, the broodmare sire of Lord Helpus, was another specialist sprinter and so were Golden Cloud’s sire Gold Bridge and Vilmorin, sire of Lord Helpus’ very speedy second dam, Poplin. Lord Helpus seemed to be fulfilling his destiny when he showed consistently useful form over sprint distances at two. However, an amenable temperament encouraged Hills to move the colt up in distance at three, when Lord Helpus achieved a Timeform rating of 111 in scoring twice over a mile. The 4-year-old Lord Helpus then showed even further progress, when he achieved his finest victory in the Princess of Wales’s Stakes (Gr.3) over a mile and a half.

Of course the stamina had to come from somewhere, the most obvious sources being Green God’s grandsires Nasrullah and Guersant, both of whom just about stayed a mile and a half. Clearly, this latent stamina eventually proved more potent than the fast blood in Lord Helpus’ pedigree. So will the presence of one very fast horse in Dawn Approach’s pedigree, his broodmare sire Phone Trick, be more influential than the fact that his next three dams are daughters of Pleasant Colony, Alydar and Sea-Bird II?

In case you’ve forgotten, Pleasant Colony won the Kentucky Derby and Preakness before siring several high-class performers over a mile and a half, including Colonial Affair (Belmont Stakes G1), Denon (Turf Classic G1) and St Jovite (winner of the G1 Irish Derby and King George for Jim Bolger). Alydar was a fine second in each of Affirmed’s Triple Crown wins, running him to a head in the Belmont Stakes. And the majestic Sea-Bird still has strong claims to being the finest mile-and-a-half horse in living memory.

To get back to Phone Trick, fast horses inevitably predominate among the good winners produced by his daughters, good examples being Zensational, Old Topper and Universal Form. Fortunately for Dawn Approach’s admirers, there are exceptions to the rule, the finest being Unbridled’s daughter Exogenous. With a G1 Kentucky Derby and G1 Breeders’ Cup Classic winner as her sire, Exogenous stayed well enough to triumph in a pair of Grade 1s over a mile and an eighth and she was also runner-up in Grade 1s over a mile and a quarter and a mile and a half (appearing not to stay the latter distance). Then there’s Eye of the Tiger, a Grade 2 winner over 1 3/16 miles, and Connected, a Grade 3 scorer over 1 1/8 miles.

Therefore, there is good reason for thinking that Dawn Approach will not be troubled by a mile and a quarter, but only the racecourse test will tell us whether he can also excel over the Derby distance. It is worth pointing out that the late great Vincent O’Brien was of the opinion that a mile and a quarter was the optimum distance for some of his English and Irish Derby winners. Sheer class can help eke out a colt’s stamina, and Dawn Approach certainly has that, so I think the idea of putting him to the test in the Derby is the right one, no matter what the result. Dawn Approach’s dam Hymn of the Dawn cost no more than $18,000 as a weanling. She failed to win in five attempts and her dam Colonial Debut also retired winless after eight starts. Even his third dam Kittihawk Miss, won only once in seven starts. Don’t get the wrong idea, though. The 2000 Guineas hero comes from a female line which has achieved a great deal. Colonial Debut’s best effort was her Tale of the Cat colt Galantas, a smart miler who earned the equivalent of over $300,000. Dawn Approach’s fifth dam is Ole Liz, a winner of six of her 12 juvenile starts back in 1965. As a daughter of Double Jay and Islay Mist, Ole Liz was a sister to Bourbon Mist, and both these sisters proved very influential producers.

The Newstead Farm Dispersal in 1985 provided abundant evidence as to Ole Liz’s talents. Her daughter Kittiwake, now the fourth dam of Dawn Approach, realized $3.8 million at the age of 17. Kittiwake’s daughters Larida and Miss Oceana sold for $4million and $7million, respectively. Dawn Approach’s third dam, Kittihawk Miss, was a sister to Miss Oceana, whose record stood at an impressive 11 wins and 6 seconds from 19 starts. Good enough to win five of her six juvenile starts, Miss Oceana progressed to boost her total of Grade 1 wins to five, including one over a mile and an eighth. She also finished third in the CCA Oaks over a mile and a half. Kittiwake was 21 when she foaled the last of her four stakes winners, the Group 1-winning Nureyev colt Kitwood, who stayed a mile and a quarter in France. Kittiwake is also the second dam of Magic of Life, winner of the G1 Coronation Stakes. Ole Liz is also the third dam of Film Maker, a highclass turf filly who scored at up to a mile and a half.

Dawn Approach isn’t the only proof that this female line is still flourishing; other recent Grade 1 winners being Aruna (a Mr. Greeley filly descending from Kittiwake who scored at up to 1 3/8 miles) and Love Theway Youare (2012 Vanity Handicap). Beaconaire, another of Ole Liz’s daughters, produced the high-class filly Sabin, who collected Grade 1 wins in the Yellow Ribbon Stakes and Gamely Handicap. Bourbon Mist’s daughter Fire Water bred the champion filly Life’s Magic, whose wins included the G1 Breeders’ Cup Distaff, and Bourbon Mist is also the third dam of two very different types in Europe, namely Nuclear Debate, a top sprinter, and the stamina-packed Amilynx, twice a winner of the G1 Prix Royal-Oak.

Dawn Approach Pedigree
Dawn Approach Pedigree

Extracts from Thoroughbred Daily News

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AUSTRALIA COMES OF AGE

Australian Horse Racing
Australian Horse Racing

Australia Comes Of Age

(Image : Travel Australia / ABC)

“An inborn fetish for the horse game, extraordinary purses,

and some remarkable strategizing and marketing, has positioned racing as the glamour industry of the new millennium.”

Mick Goss
Mick Goss

Mick Goss

Summerhill Stud CEOEvents under the Morton Fig tree at Inglis’ Newmarket Sales complex in Sydney drew to a close on last week. You need only look at the strength of their currency to know that Australia is one of the economic success stories of the modern era. While nobody has been untouched by the global financial meltdown of the past five years, Australia is one of the few countries to have emerged stronger than before. This is no more reflected in any sector than in the racing world, where an inborn fetish for the horse game, extraordinary purses, and some remarkable strategizing and marketing, has positioned racing as the glamour industry of the new millennium.

Twice last week, the A$3million record set by Markus Jooste and Charles Laird at the same sales ring seven years ago, was not just passed, but smashed, with Black Caviar’s half-brother by Redoute’s Choice scaling the heights at A$5million (getting on for R50million) and a son of Fastnet Rock banking A$4million on the final day.

The Aussies have come to believe in themselves, and especially in their domestic products, and here we speak not only of racehorses, but in virtually every realm in which they operate. Witness the confidence with which their sportsmen confront the world, at the faith Australians have in their own judgment and the confidence they invest in their home-grown stallions, and you know that they can live on their own resources without any complex of inferiority in any sphere. Indeed, revisit the top twenty prices on the sale, and you’ll find that whilst the list is punctuated by the odd son or daughter of a foreign-based stallion, the bulk of the big achievers descend from their own “Colonial” bred stock, and in particular, Fastnet Rock and Redoute’s Choice. It’s true that Australians owe the presence of these two stallions to the remarkable shuttle sire Danehill, who singlehandedly changed the entire face of Australasian breeding in the 1990s, but who is handsomely succeeded by these two outstanding sons, the one the rage of the 2000s, and Fastnet Rock peerless in his current dominance.

There are a couple of things that have conspired in favour of Australian racing and breeding, the first of which is their genetic predisposition for, and their love of, the game. It is palpably apparent on any Australasian racecourse, whether it takes place at what they call “in town”, or at one of the more than a hundred country racecourses. I’ve been to a “picnic” race meeting in South Australia, where some 40,000 pack into a place which looks more like a meadow in the days before and after, but which has been the focus of its community for well over a century now. The second is that the Australian government appreciates the value and the contribution racing makes to the economy, knowing that it’s not only the greatest job creator they have and a significant contributor to state coffers, but that the modern Australian thoroughbred is an enormous generator of foreign investment. To be frank, while the Aussies are pretty darn good horsemen themselves, they have nothing like the natural reservoir of talented stockmen we have.

All we need is for government to appreciate what we can do for the economy and for job creation; all we need is for the playing fields with the casinos and bookmakers to be levelled, a little help in getting our exports sorted and a bit of encouragement, and we can all dream.

That’s all we need; because Mike de Kock has already shown the world how good our horses are.

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DARLEY INVESTS IN ANIMAL KINGDOM

Sheikh Mohammed - Darley Stud
Sheikh Mohammed - Darley Stud

His Highness Sheikh Mohammed

(Darley America)

ANIMAL KINGDOM

Leroidesanimaux (Brz) - Dalcia (Ger)

Darley has acquired a 29% interest in Dubai World Cup and Kentucky Derby winner Animal Kingdom, Arrowfield Stud and Team Valor International announced earlier this week.

As a result, Animal Kingdom will stand in the Northern Hemisphere at Darley’s Jonabell Farm in Lexington, Kentucky. The son of Leroidesanimaux will stand in the Southern Hemisphere at John Messara’s Arrowfield Stud in Australia.

“Animal Kingdom is outstanding,” said Darley’s COO Oliver Tait. “Not only is he immensely talented, he has shown a rare ability to excel on turf, synthetic, and dirt, and win at a range of distances up to the mile and a quarter of the Kentucky Derby and the Dubai World Cup. His win at Meydan last Saturday was all class.”

Added Arrowfield’s chairman John Messara, “We are delighted to partner with Darley in the ownership of Animal Kingdom and management of his future international stud career. We have always had a great working relationship with Darley and have the utmost respect for His Highness Sheikh Mohammed and the Darley management team. “With our unprecedented combined support, Animal Kingdom will have every opportunity to develop from a champion racehorse into a champion sire.”

Current plans call for Animal Kingdom to travel to England to race, with the Queen Anne Stakes or the Prince of Wales’s Stakes at Royal Ascot as possible engagements.

Animal Kingdom’s majestic two-length victory in the March 30 Dubai World Cup over 2,000 meters was the first US-trained success in the race since it has been held on the synthetic Tapeta surface at Meydan. The win took his career earnings to $8.3 million.

Extract from Bloodhorse

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