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SOUTH AFRICAN THOROUGHBRED EARNINGS JUNE 2010

pierre jourdan south african thoroughbred racehorse
pierre jourdan south african thoroughbred racehorse

Pierre Jourdan

(Photo : JC Photographics / Summerhill Stud)

TOP 50 RACEHORSES BY STAKES

1 August 2009 - 9 June 2010

#

Horse

Age

Sex

Runs

Wins

Win%

Stakes (ZAR)

1

PIERRE JOURDAN

3

G

8

6

75%

3,174,425

2

MOTHER RUSSIA

4

F

7

4

57%

2,315,750

3

IRISH FLAME

3

C

9

5

55%

1,922,080

4

RIVER JETEZ

6

M

6

3

50%

1,839,510

5

REGAL RANSOM

4

G

9

4

44%

1,440,375

6

ASLAN

4

G

5

1

20%

1,292,500

7

NOORHOEK FLYER (SNL)

3

C

8

4

50%

1,248,500

8

POCKET POWER

7

G

4

3

75%

989,380

9

SMART BANKER

5

G

6

3

50%

970,000

10

NOBLE HEIR

4

F

10

4

40%

962,250

11

MOKARO

6

G

4

2

50%

875,000

12

CAPTAIN’S GAL

4

F

8

5

62%

722,500

13

FISANI

3

F

9

3

33%

706,750

14

HAVASHA

3

G

10

3

30%

663,800

15

PHUNYUKA

5

G

11

3

27%

617,025

16

RUDRA

5

H

4

1

25%

599,375

17

HERE TO WIN (BRZ)

3

F

7

3

42%

573,375

18

IMPERIOUS STAR

3

F

7

5

71%

562,880

19

FIELD FLOWER

3

F

11

3

27%

555,400

20

BOLD SILVANO

3

C

7

3

42%

548,125

21

GALILEO’S GALAXY (AUS)

3

C

6

2

33%

542,500

22

BULSARA

3

G

8

1

12%

541,500

23

BRAVURA

3

G

5

5

100%

541,250

24

ARCOLA

3

F

7

2

28%

536,250

25

MAGICAL

4

G

4

0

0%

529,400

26

MOROCCAN (ZIM)

4

G

7

5

71%

513,125

27

QUEEN’S BAY

4

F

9

5

55%

512,000

28

SPICED GOLD

3

F

8

1

12%

487,600

29

WINNING LEAP

3

G

7

4

57%

465,000

30

CURVED BALL (AUS)

3

C

5

3

60%

460,875

31

CYBER CASE

5

G

10

4

40%

455,120

32

WARM WHITE NIGHT

4

C

6

2

33%

454,750

33

FORT VOGUE

4

G

7

2

28%

454,130

34

WAYWEST GODDESS

2

F

5

2

40%

450,875

35

SEATTLE ICE (AUS)

4

G

7

2

28%

437,550

36

PRESTIC

5

M

3

1

33%

433,000

37

SPARKLING GEM

4

F

6

1

16%

432,500

38

LINK MAN

2

C

4

3

75%

409,880

39

KAPIL

7

G

5

1

20%

395,000

40

CAPTAIN SCOTT

4

G

8

2

25%

390,650

41

NOBLEWOOD

5

G

7

1

14%

390,030

42

ARABIAN MIST

5

G

8

2

25%

388,650

43

PRECEDENT

4

F

10

5

50%

386,950

44

JJ THE JET PLANE

5

G

1

1

100%

375,000

45

ROBERT THE BRUCE

3

G

10

2

20%

369,250

46

BRAGGADACIO

6

G

12

1

8%

367,500

47

CHOCOLICIOUS

2

F

3

2

66%

367,130

48

VERTICAL TAKEOFF

4

G

12

4

3%

359,750

49

FABIANI

4

G

5

1

20%

357,500

50

TROPICAL EMPIRE (AUS)

7

H

5

3

60%

352,510

THE WHOLE WORLD IS WATCHING

the whole world is watching pi
the whole world is watching pi

(Photo : Summerhill Stud)

SUMMERHILL BLOG ATTRACTS 93 COUNTRIES

Attention was riveted on South Africa on Friday evening as the draw for the 2010 World Football Cup was announced. For some reason, there’s been a popular belief in some circles in the “civilized” world, that Africa could never deliver on a tournament of this scale, and for four years now there’s been conjecture that our stadiums would never make muster, let alone be ready on time. That every one of them has been completed not only on time, but in a grandeur that compares with to the best in the world, will hopefully and finally put that one to rest. We have some challenges in front of us, notably transport and accommodation facilities, but this country’s used to coping with challenges, much bigger than these, and unless the evidence tells us otherwise, the world can relax. Crime stats are apparently improving too, and that’s a consolation even for the locals.

Just as the eyes of the world have been focussed on this grand showpiece, we’re always flattered by the number of people who take the time to visit our website. As popular as our blog has been over the years, it reached unprecedented levels last month when our visitors included people from 93 individual countries. You’d expect us to enjoy the focus from time to time, of the racing nations of the world, but it seems there are enthusiasts across the globe. Have a look at the table below for proof of that pudding.

Country

Visitors

Country

Visitors

South Africa

2678

United Kingdom

380

United States

194

Australia

109

Canada

54

Germany

54

Netherlands

25

France

21

New Zealand

16

India

16

Portugal

15

Ireland

13

Sweden

9

Brazil

9

United Arab Emirates

8

Switzerland

6

Hong Kong

6

Singapore

6

Spain

5

Bulgaria

5

Argentina

5

Luxembourg

5

Slovenia

5

Poland

5

Philippines

5

Qatar

4

Denmark

4

Greece

4

Zambia

4

Bahrain

4

Ital

4

Chile

4

South Korea

4

Turkey

4

Mexico

3

British Virgin Islands

3

Cyprus

3

Indonesia

3

Norway

3

Austria

3

Botswana

3

Malaysia

3

Israel

3

Mozambique

3

Mauritius

3

Malawi

3

Belgium

3

Finland

3

Saudi Arabia

3

Pakistan

3

Lesotho

3

Serbia

2

Macedonia

2

Colombia

2

Kenya

2

Vietnam

2

Czech Republic

2

Romania

2

Ghana

2

Saint Lucia

2

Egypt

2

Slovakia

2

Algeria

2

Thailand

2

Bangladesh

1

Madagascar

1

Jordan

1

Guatemala

1

U.S. Virgin Islands

1

Latvia

1

Gabon

1

Gambia

1

Haiti

1

Jamaica

1

Ukraine

1

Iran

1

Nigeria

1

Peru

1

Taiwan

1

Fiji

1

Georgia

1

Albania

1

Sri Lanka

1

Puerto Rico

1

Guernsey

1

Barbados

1

SIX OF THE BEST

summerhill stud grade one
summerhill stud grade one

“A Grade One victory, the Holy Grail of our sport”

(Photo : Summerhill Stud)

“More Bulldust Part 6”

Extract from Summerhill Sires Brochure 2009-2010

When you see the full regalia of six “green” flags hoisted at the Summerhill Stallion barn, be sure there’s a celebration cooking.

That’s the sign of a Grade One victory, the Holy Grail of our sport. Qualifying for a Grade One is an unfailingly accurate gauge of class. You need it to get there, and you refine it by staying there.

In recent times, the “green” flags have been doing a lot of fluttering at Summerhill. A Gold Cup hero, a Flying Championship ace and a Garden Province queen.

And just to show that class is a way of life at Summerhill, dual Guineas victor Imbongi, Paris Perfect and Art of War have been blazing their own trails across the sands of Dubai. At the highest level.

What it all comes down to, is this. The best of land, the best of people, and the best of care. And there’s no such thing as a “minor” detail.

In fact, you could say it’s what makes Summerhill Summerhill.

email
email

If you’re not on the mailing list, or if you’d like to check that you are,

please email Marlene at info@summerhill.co.za for your copy

of the world’s number one Sires brochure.

Click below to read “Bulldust”

Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5

bulldust part 1
bulldust part 1
bulldust part 2
bulldust part 2
bulldust part 3
bulldust part 3
bulldust part 4
bulldust part 4
bulldust part 5
bulldust part 5

Jockey "Monkey Crouch" and Racehorse Speed

jockey monkey crouch
jockey monkey crouch

Click above to watch

“Jockeys - Win or Die Trying”

“A SKILLED JOCKEY CAN LESSEN THE WORK OF A RACEHORSE”

“Major horse race times and records improved by 5% to 7% around 1900 when jockeys adopted a crouched posture,” reported researchers in a recent study, entitled “Modern riding style improves horse racing times”.

Horsetalk writes that researchers have shown that the “monkey crouch” adopted by jockeys helped improve horse speed over the more conservative position adopted by riders of earlier eras.

The findings of Dr Thilo Pfau, Dr Andrew Spence, Dr Sandra Starke, Dr Marta Ferrari and Professor Alan Wilson were reported in the journal Science this week.

“When animals carry loads, there is a proportionate increase in metabolic cost, and in humans this increase in cost is reduced when the load is elastically coupled to the load bearer,” they wrote.

“We show that jockeys move to isolate themselves from the movement of their mount.

“This would be difficult or impossible with a seated or upright, straight-legged posture.

“This isolation means that the horse supports the jockey’s body weight but does not have to move the jockey through each cyclical stride path.

“This posture requires substantial work by jockeys, who have near-maximum heart rates during racing.”

The old-fashioned riding style before 1900 involved long stirrups.

It was American jockeys who started to compete successfully in British racing using the now familiar shorter stirrups and a monkey-crouch position.

The style was popularised by US jockey Ted Sloan, which gave rise to the expression “monkey on a stick” to describe the position.

The 5%-7% time drop in times was huge, with race times since then only edging gradually down.

The researchers attached inertia sensors to the saddle and to the jockey to allow them to measure the movement of both the horse and jockey independently and then compare the data.

They speculated that the crouched riding style of modern jockeys allows them to avoid the acceleration and deceleration that the horse has to apply to an inert load, so that the jockey maintains a comparatively constant speed throughout each stride, thus making less work for the horse.

The results showed that the forwards and backwards, and up and down movements, of the jockey was much less than that of the horse.

This scientifically shows that a skilled jockey can lessen the work the horse has to do, resulting in an increase in speed.

The researchers said that the crouched style could also reduce aerodynamic drag, but their calculations indicated this would have accounted for just 2% of the 5%-7% improvement in racing times.

TIMEFORM 120 FOR IMBONGI

imbongi timeform 120
imbongi timeform 120

Imbongi joins the elite Timeform 120 club

(Photo : Summerhill Stud)

“THE POWER OF 120”

It’s long been our belief that the greatest way to shape the breed positively, is to use the best racehorses as sires, and we’re on record recently as saying that our bunch is a Timeform 120. That means in order for a horse to get through the eye of the Summerhill needle, he has to impress the judges at the world’s most prestigious racing agency that he’s worthy of a 120, hence the presence in our barn of horses of the ilk of KAHAL, MULLINS BAY, SOLSKJAER, WAY WEST, STRONGHOLD, MALHUB, and now A P ARROW and ADMIRE MAIN. All of whom are 120’s or better, which entitles them to claim the mantle of being among the top ½% of racehorses worldwide.

The latest member of the club is the Summerhill-bred, Emperors Palace Ready to Run graduate IMBONGI, who earned this lofty status with his facile win in the John Bovington Memorial Criterion Stakes (Gr3) at Newmarket in England.

While five consecutive Breeder’s Championships is enough to make any man proud, a performance of IMBONGI’s class against the best the world has to offer, given South Africa’s isolated history, is new turf for us and he joins PARIS PERFECT and ART OF WAR among Summerhill-raised horses to have performed with distinction at the elite international level this year.

JAPANESE STALLIONS : Heirs to the Throne...

deep impact horse
deep impact horse

Deep Impact

(Photo : Great Horses)

Deep Impact, Symboli Kris S, Daiwa Major, Neo Universe

Japanese stallions continue to duel through their progeny’s accomplishments for the title of successor to Sunday Silence as the nation’s predominant sire. Deep Impact, Symboli Kris S, Daiwa Major and Neo Universe, all have indicated they might at least vie for the crown.

Thoroughbred Daily News writes that Deep Impact has left his mark all over the Japan Racing Horse Association’s select sale for the second consecutive year. The Triple Crown winner generated about 20 percent of last year’s gross with his first crop, and has been connected to many high-priced horses this year, either by siring them or being related to them through the female family.

Horsemen generally believe that Deep Impact’s second crop appears to be superior to his first, said JRHA spokesman Naohiro Goda. Deep Impact is known for siring athletic and balanced offspring, many of whom have lovely heads and eyes.

Neo Universe is perhaps the stallion that horsemen are talking about the most. With two male Classic winners from his first crop and the final Japanese Classic race still to be run, this striking son of Sunday Silence already has accomplished something no other sire has been able to do in Japan. This year, Neo Universe covered about 250 mares at the Shadai Stallion Station, more than any other Japanese stallion. “He is such a fantastic stallion,” praised Teruya Yoshida, who runs the nation’s leading stud with his brothers and knows Sunday Silence’s sons as well as anyone. “His foals look so smart; they have a sharp expression and refined heads, and he’s good to mate with any kind of mares”.

deep impact video link
deep impact video link

Click above to watch

Deep Impact in the Japan Cup 2006

Market Correction at Japan Sales

lot 275 foal colt by daiwa major
lot 275 foal colt by daiwa major

Top Lot 275 by Daiwa Major (Sunday Silence) out of Wind In Her Hair

(Photo : M MacDonald)

Japan Racing Horse Association July Select Sale

Day 2 Foal Session

Although the yearling sales day was described as “amazing” by breeders at the JRHA sale on Monday, sober realism erased the euphoria as the prices for the first session of foals plunged.

The Thoroughbred Daily News reports : “This is a market we must accept under the current economy,” said JRHA spokesman Naohiro Goda, suggesting that consignors may have become too optimistic following a 15-percent leap upward in gross during Monday’s yearling session. “Some consignors set high reserves for the first foal session, which resulted in the high buy-back rate,” Naohiro Goda said, explaining that some viewed the trend of increasing strength in Japan’s yearling market as an incentive to hold onto their foals for sale in 2010, unless they received outstanding prices.

Traditionally, Japanese buyers have preferred to purchase foals, but market predilections are following international standards and shifting toward yearlings.

Summerhill Sires Video 2009 - 2010

summerhill stallions video
summerhill stallions video

Please click above to load video.

If you have a slow connection, please be patient.

Thank you.

Mick Goss presents the Summerhill Stud Stallions for the 2009 - 2010 season. The lineup includes AP Arrow, Admire Main, Malhub, Stronghold, Solskjaer, Ravishing, Kahal, Muhtafal, Mullins Bay and Way West.

Summerhill Stud : The Genuine Article
Summerhill Stud : The Genuine Article

For more information please visit :

www.summerhill.co.za

South African Breeders' Championship : THE BIG FIVE

a misty morning at summerhill stud
a misty morning at summerhill stud

A misty Summerhill morning

(Photo : Greig Muir)

“More Bulldust Part 3”

Extract from Summerhill Sires Brochure 2009-2010

Horses are a language we can all share.

Sometimes there are quiet asides, sometimes dramatic moments, but there’s always a story to tell. Look hard enough and you’ll find romance in the life of every great racehorse.

At Summerhill, we think we’re the luckiest people on the planet. We wake up on one of the great pieces of real estate on earth; we gaze out upon a World Heritage site, the Drakensberg; we go to work with some of mankind’s finest human beings; and we get to work with the noblest creature the good Lord ever created.

On the way, we’ve visited the mountain top, a place few people ever get to go. In the annals of recorded history, only six farms have ever aspired to the South African Breeders’ Championship, the tightest contest in all of racing. In what must surely be remembered as the “Summerhill decade”, we’ve known so many champagne moments, but they are mere footnotes in an extraordinary tour de force.

Understand, there was no big enterprise or family cash behind Summerhill. In a world as competitive as it’s ever been, and with massive fortunes pouring into the game, we’ve had to do things differently. A bit of inspiration, loads of perspiration, the occasional celebration.

The result is an animal that’s had to be different. A horse that runs like he knows what he owes.

The “Toyota” of South African racing: excellent quality, great dependability, and outstanding value. The virtues our nation has come to respect most. And they know too, this is the “Genuine Article”. Honest, authentic, the original.

Any number of records and five consecutive Breeders’ Championships later, besides God, we owe these victories to the racehorse. Our history was written on his back. We are his heirs, but he is his own heritage.

For close on a century now, our families have devoted themselves to this religion. We are unashamedly proud of our connectivity with our sport, and the fact that every day, there’s a new story to tell.

So mark this then. When you’re dealing with Summerhill, you’re not only buying a horse or a service. You’re buying a piece of history.

south african breeders log
south african breeders log
email us
email us

If you’re not on the mailing list, or if you’d like to check that you are,

please email Marlene at info@summerhill.co.za for your copy

of the world’s number one Sires brochure.

Click below to read “Bulldust” Part 1 and Part 2

bulldust part 1
bulldust part 1
bulldust part 2
bulldust part 2

Kahal colt tops day one at Sibaya Yearling Sale

kahal stallion
kahal stallion

Backworth Stud led the vendors on day one of the 2009 Sibaya Yearling Sale when the hammer dropped for an impressive looking colt by Kahal, recording the highest priced lot for the day.

In a Bloodstock South Africa media release it is reported that Chad Cooke’s Intercontinental Bloodstock paid the top price of R240,000 for this son of Kahal.

The grey colt, named Frappe, is the first produce of the Salaadim mare Absolut Star and his new owner, John Finlayson, plans to rename him “Shaken Not Stirred”.

The Johannesburg-based businessman was excited to secure this lot and said: “Dean Alexander picked him, I really liked him and Dr John McVeigh also gave us the thumbs up, so we’re happy all round. There is a connection to Vodka in the name of his dam and I like mine shaken, hence the name change!”

Dean Alexander commented: “This colt has classic features, he has presence and quality and I believe this was a good price.”

There were indeed plenty of value buys scattered across the first 180 lots with several sold at the floor price of R10,000. “In the present economic climate it was good to see that many breeders were willing to let their stock go instead of hanging on,” said BloodStock South Africa’s CEO, Jan Naudè.

There were 18 more lots unsold than in 2008 which contributed to the 22% drop in aggregate from R9.435-million to R7.355-million. The average price of R57,913 was down only 10% from R64,623 recorded last year and Naudè commented: “The decline in turnover was in line with the one recorded at the Emperors Palace National Yearling Sale so it’s fair to say we’re holding our own.”

Day two was the turn of two fillies by Red Ransom and Fusaichi Pegasus to nudge into top spots with the hammer falling at R260,000 and R400,000 respectively.

The Sibaya Yearling Sale takes place annually at the Sibaya Casino and Entertainment Kingdom just North of Umhlanga Rocks.

frappe pedigree link
frappe pedigree link

View

Pedigree

A.P. ARROW FIRES : THE WORLD TALKS

ap arrow dubaiA.P. Arrow
(Photo : AP Photo)

A glance at the number of publications that carried the news of A.P. Arrow’s importation to Summerhill and South Africa tells us that this is a big “item” horse in the real sense of “big”. Just about every worthwhile daily racing publication in the world covered his story, a veritable who’s who of the game. It takes a “heavy” to make newsworthy reading, and A.P.Arrow’s standing in the pantheon of racing was obvious from the popularity of his story. Here’s a list of the publications.

Thoroughbred Times
A.P. Arrow to stand in South Africa
http://www.thoroughbredtimes.com/breeding-news/2009/May/31/AP-Arrow-to-stand-in-South-Africa.aspx

Racingweb
Summerhill and co acquire a top son of A.P. Indy
http://www.racingweb.co.za/2009/05/summerhill-and-co-acquire-a-top-son-of-ap-indy/

Tab Online
Summerhill and co acquire a top son of A.P. Indy
http://news.tabonline.co.za/Home/tabid/37/ctl/Details/mid/393/ItemID/2842/Default.aspx

OneFastHorse
A.P.Arrow to stand in South Africa
http://onefasthorse.com/blogs/blood-horse-breeding-news/archive/2009/05/28/a-p-arrow-to-stand-in-south-africa.aspx

Daily Racing Form
www.drf.com/news/article/104140.html

Gold Circle
Summerhill and co acquire a top son of A.P. Indy
http://www.goldcircle.co.za/news/Breeding/today.shtml

SA Horseracing
Grade 2 Hero A P Arrow To Stud in South Africa
http://www.sahracing.com/index/contents/seeall/12681

Breeding & Racing Magazine
http://www.breedingandracing.com/

Global News Blog
AP Arrow to stand in South Africa
http://globalnewsblog.com/blog/2009/05/31/south-africa-politics-and-news-monitor-a-p-arrow-to-stand-in-south-africa-thoroughbred-times/

Thoroughbred Internet
A.P.Arrow to stand stud in South Africa
http://www.thoroughbredinternet.com/

Hatena Antenna
http://a.hatena.ne.jp/umatoneko/?gid=213528

European Bloodstock News
http://www.bloodstock-news.com/

Thoroughbred Daily News
http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/

Racing Post
Grade 2 hero A P Arrow to stud in South Africa
http://www.racingpost.com/news/bloodstock/grade-2-hero-a-p-arrow-to-stud-in-south-africa/189455/

Bloodhorse
A.P. Arrow to Stand in South Africa
http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/50986/a-p-arrow-to-stand-in-south-africa

Horse Racing Nation
AP Arrow to Stand in South Africa
http://horseracingnation.com/horse/A_P_Arrow

Mike de Kock Racing
A.P. Indy stallion comes to Summerhill
http://www.mikedekockracing.com/Default.aspx?tabid=1743

Thoroughbred Champions
Pioneering to Brazil, A.P. Arrow to South Africa
http://thoroughbredchampions.com/forum/index.php?topic=34606.0

Breeding Racing
US Sire A.P Arrow To Stud in South Africa
http://www.breedingracing.com/textnews.php?newsdate=2009-05-27

CBS Sports
A.P. Arrow to stand in S.Africa
http://horseracing.cbssports.com/cbs/headlines/print.aspx?articleId=36560

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MEDAGLIA D’ORO : A windfall for Sheikh Mohammed

Medaglia D’Oro
(Photo : Thoroughbred Times)

There’s been plenty of news of late of new property acquisitions by Dubai’s Ruler, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, and then on Friday we were greeted by the announcement that he had purchased the “hottest” young stallion in the United States, Medaglia D’Oro. Those that attended the 2007 version of the Dubai World Cup will recall Medaglia D’Oro’s stirring battle in the closing stages of the world’s richest race when he succumbed, only just, to the persistent urgings of Pleasantly Perfect, and we can attest, following a recent visit there, to the fact that Medaglia D’Oro has let down into one of the most spectacular specimens of a young stallion imaginable.

Besides having spawned the highest rated filly (of any age) in the world right now in the form of Rachel Alexandra, (20 ¼ winner of the Kentucky Oaks (Gr.1) just over a month ago, and vanquisher of the colts in the second leg of the American Triple Crown, the Preakness Stakes (Gr.1), Medaglia D’Oro rewarded Sheikh Mohammed’s boldness within a day, with yet another Grade One winner from his first crop in the shape of Gabby’s Golden Gal, who walked off with the laurels in the Acorn Stakes (Gr.1) at the Belmont meeting in New York.

Medaglia D’ Oro’s sire, El Prado, is something of an aberration as a stallion. A son of the thirteen time European Champion, Sadler’s Wells, he raced exclusively in Ireland on turf, and was a Grade One winner of the National Stakes as a two-year-old before his acquisition by Frank Stronach’s Adena Springs (champion breeders of America and clients of Summerhill) where he was asked to embark on a career as a proven grass horse in a “dirty”country. El Prado warmed to his new career with relish, twice topping the American sires log, and it now looks as if he might make a third career for himself as a sire of sires. Everything about him suggested that success on the dirt tracks of the United States was an unlikely outcome to his career, yet it goes to show, there is little we can do to predict the future of stallions, besides educated guessing.

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Classic double for the Becks at GAINESWAY FARM

Birdstone
(Photo : Stallion Register)

Just on twenty years ago, I was privy to a glimpse at an intimate connection at the Breeders’ Cup meeting of 1990 between local “el padrino”, Graham Beck, and the then founder not only of Gainesway Farm, but also of the Breeders’ Cup, John Gaines. Earlier that day, Buddy Bishop, renowned solicitor operating in Lexington, Kentucky, and legal counsel to what was then the principal opposition to Gainesway, the Hancock family’s famous Claiborne Farm, confided in me that a South African was rumoured to have purchased Gainesway. I was astonished, and dismissed it as conjecture. After all, this was the farm that housed the likes of Lyphard, Blushing Groom, Riverman, Vaguely Noble, Irish River, Cozzene, Afleet etc, and it was almost inconceivable that it should be a South African that had put up his hand for this iconic property, when all the world was there to compete for it.

It turned out that Buddy Bishop’s “intelligence” was spot-on, and that the enterprise of Graham Beck, the stuff of legend in South Africa, had indeed laid claim to one of the greatest titles in thoroughbred racing. I wrote about this property two weeks ago as a place of solace to me on the passing of my late mother, and today we can celebrate the fact that one of its resident stallions, Birdstone (who spoilt the party for Funny Cide in his quest for the American Triple Crown, by snatching the laurels in the final leg of the Belmont Stakes (Gr.1), has produced from his very first crop, two winners of separate legs of the Triple Crown.

The first and arguably the most famous leg, the Kentucky Derby (Gr.1) was taken in spectacular fashion by a 50-1 chance in the form of Mine That Bird (by Birdstone), who came from a shotgun position at the back of the field to land a storied victory by six, and who was the sole pursuer of the filly Rachel Alexandra, in the Preakness Stakes (Gr.1) a fortnight later.

In the absence of the filly, Mine That Bird was made a certainty by the bettors for Saturday, and he looked home and hosed shortly after they turned into Belmont’s fabled straight, only to be swamped by two foes, one of whom was his paternal half-brother, Summer Bird, who came home to proclaim his sire, if not yet quite in the same league as Medaglia D’Oro as a commercial stallion, certainly every bit as serious a property in reality.

Birdstone is the son of a Kentucky Derby winner himself, the rather unattractive and poor legged Grindstone, he in turn by Unbridled and tracing back, (no alarms), to Mr. Prospector, whose stamp on the American classics is as indelible as any stallion in history. As for Birdstone, he’s not a big fellow (I would say he stands 15’3 at the most) and he’s what one might describe as a “plain brown job”. However, and particularly considering his ancestral belongings, he’s a clean legged horse, well balanced and displays the touch of class that separates the serious from the ordinary.

   

Watch the 2009 Belmont Stakes and Kentucky Derby

THE INVESTEC ENGLISH DERBY (GR.1)

Saturday’s smashing victory in the greatest Derby of them all, the one at Epsom Downs in England, by Sea The Stars was a moment to remember.

J J THE JET PLANE : All Summerhill and Hartford

Northern Guest
(Photo: Summerhill Stud)

You read our piece on J J The Jet Plane’s fine performance in the Leisure Stakes last week. A few notes on his origins.

Firstly, he’s another example of close and successful in-breeding to the grand old man of the game, Northern Dancer. But closer to home, J.J. is out of Majestic Guest, who was bred and raised at Summerhill, the daughter of the fellow who’s paid for most of what you see around us today, Northern Guest. Of course Northern Guest, is the most decorated broodmare sire in South African history, so it’s no surprise that one of his daughters pop up with a horse of J.J’s ilk.

That said, Majestic Guest was a product of a granddaughter of the one-time incumbent of our barn, Home Guard, from a family which is all Hartford, going back to the days of the Ellis family. Majestic Guest’s granddam, Fantastic, was a winner of the Grade One Breeders Champion Fillies Stakes, in turn a daughter of one the best racers to grace the Hartford paddocks, Panjandrum.

As for Jet Master himself, J.J’s sire, his great granddam resided at Summerhill as the property of the late Dickie Dunn, and her daughter, Jolly Laughter, was bred and raised at Summerhill. To complete the circle, Jet Master’s own mother Jet Lightening, was sold for the paltry sum of R10,000 at the annual KZN Broodmare Sale, which in those days was hosted in Malhub’s paddock alongside the Summerhill office. Talk about rags to riches.

There’s a lot of sentiment riding on J J The Jet Plane’s entry at Royal Ascot in a fortnight, particularly in this quarter, and we’re tipping him to make it a double notwithstanding the Aussie assault from Takeover Target. Both the King’s Stand Stakes (Gr.1), and the race which made Malhub famous, the Golden Jubilee Sprint (Gr.1), beckon.

ADMIRE MAIN : Africa's First Son of Sunday Silence

admire main africa rss

Many people appear to think this is not a sensible time to be investing in assets of any kind, let alone racehorses. Yet in the annals of the Goss family, it’s only a matter of history repeating itself. When Pat Goss snr found himself in the winner’s circle in the aftermath of St Pauls’ victory in the 1946 Durban July, he immediately set out to acquire a son of the world’s pre-eminent stallion at the time, Hyperion, applying the entire first prize to the purpose.

Just a month ago, the Summerhill contingent returned to the farm from a triumphant National Yearling Sale. Within a matter of weeks, they’d applied the entire proceeds (and then a bit) to the acquisition of two new stallion prospects, one of which, A.P.Arrow, was the subject of this column a fortnight ago.

In another ground-breaking event in a long-standing history of “firsts”, the nation’s leading breeders have teamed up with Japan’s perennial Champion establishment, Shadai Stallion Station and Northern Farm, in bringing this continent its first son of Sunday Silence. While it would insult his fame to repeat the detail of his achievements here, it’s fair to say, Sunday Silence has had as profound a breed- shaping impact on the evolution of the thoroughbred as any stallion of the modern era.

CORRECTIVE SURGERY - How far is too far?

foal
The Corrective Surgery Debate
(Photo : Annet Becker)

 

Early assessment and close monitoring of a foal’s conformation is crucial so that measures can be taken to improve any abnormalities. However, one particular treatment, ‘corrective surgery’, has become so commonly performed on even minor conformational imperfections that many are now questioning whether it is being carried out too frequently and whether its disclosure at the yearling sales should be mandatory.  James Tate BVMS MRCVS writes the following report for the UK’s Thoroughbred Owner & Breeder.

 

Knock-kneed or bow-legged
‘Angular limb deformities’ are conformational abnormalities seen most commonly in thoroughbred foals that require early recognition and treatment.

 

They occur more frequently in front legs, are seen when viewing the foal from the front or back and are broadly categorised into two types – ‘valgus’ and ‘varus’. A valgus conformation is where the limb deviates away from midline, for example, a foal with valgus conformation of its knees is often described as being ‘knock-kneed’. A varus conformation is where the limb deviates towards midline, for example, a foal with varus conformation of its knees is often described as being ‘bow-legged’.

 

Angular limb deformities occur most commonly at the knee (carpus) but also quite frequently at the fetlock joint or the hock. The degree of the deformity is usually evaluated by repeated visual examination but can also be measured and assessed using x-rays. The main problem is often an imbalance of growth in the growth plates. For example, if the outside of the growth plate just above the knee is growing slower than the inside, then the foal’s leg will deviate away from midline and so develop a carpal valgus conformation – knock-kneed.

 

Congenital and acquired deformities

These conformational deformities are broadly grouped into congenital or acquired forms, with congenital deformities being present at birth and acquired deformities usually appearing at a few weeks of age.


Congenital abnormalities are caused by either laxity of joint ligaments or incomplete formation of the small bones of the knee or hock. Careful palpation of joints should establish the presence of joint laxity and the conformation of such foals can usually be corrected successfully with conservative management, even in relatively severe cases.

 

Incomplete formation of the knee or hock bones is typically found in premature foals and so x-rays should be performed as a routine.

 

Conservative management of angular limb deformities is successful in most foals and, in fact, a degree of carpal valgus conformation is normal in a newborn foal.

 

Therapy consists of restricting exercise to box rest with a limited turnout period per day, providing a firm bedding and turnout pasture, as well as corrective hoof trimming and, if necessary, the use of glue-on extensions that force the foal to straighten its legs. This allows the growth plates to be stimulated but prevents stress and compression on the affected side of the growth plate. If the affected limb of a newborn foal can be manually ‘straightened’ because it is being caused by joint laxity, then conservative management will usually be successful. More severe cases are treated with splints or limb casts, but these should be used with caution and changed regularly to avoid skin rubs.

 

Acquired angular limb deformities are caused by asymmetrical bone growth from the growth plate, with one side of the growth plate growing faster than the other. Sometimes the cause of such deformities is not known, but it can be the result of injury to one side of the growth plate, uneven loading on one leg due to lameness of the other leg, inappropriate nutrition (for example, too much nutrition or an incorrect calcium/phosphorous ratio), excessive exercise, or improper foot-trimming.

 

Whilst affected foals can also be treated conservatively, this is when many foals are booked in for surgery.

 

Corrective surgery – more now than ever

There are two surgical treatments that should be used for the more severe cases but which are now being used more than ever.

 

Both techniques depend on continued growth in order to straighten the leg and so should ideally be carried out before the foal is two months old (especially in fetlock deformities) and in severe cases the techniques can be performed together.

 

The first surgical technique is a periosteal elevation, which is carried out on the side of the growth plate that is not growing fast enough and its aim is to stimulate growth on this side of the growth plate. The outer surface of the bone (the periosteum) is thought to have a restraining influence on growth and by removing a strip of periosteum over the slow-growing side of the growth plate, growth is stimulated. For example, periosteal elevations are performed on the outside of the knee in a foal with carpal valgus, or the inside of the knee in a foal with carpal varus. An inverted ‘T-shaped’ incision is usually made approximately 2.5cm above the growth plate and its maximum effect is seen after approximately two months.

 

It has a few advantages over the second surgical technique described below in that it is a one-off surgery, it is minimally invasive and there appears to be little risk of over-correction, although some argue that this is because it is not that effective. Indeed, recent research has suggested that foals with the mild deformities currently treated by periosteal elevation generally improve without the need for surgery if treated with box rest and corrective farriery alone.

 

The second surgical technique works in the opposite way to a periosteal elevation, in that it slows down the side of the growth plate that is growing too fast.

 

Temporary transphyseal bridging is the insertion of metal implants to slow down

the growth of one side of the growth plate to allow the other side to catch up.

 

Traditionally, a staple is inserted over the growth plate or two screws are placed either side of the growth plate and either wires or plates join them together.

 

However, more recently, a new method of inserting a single screw across the growth plate has been developed, as it has the advantage of a better cosmetic result. All of these methods are very effective.

 

However, the metal implants must be removed as soon as the leg is straight, otherwise over-correction and deviation in the opposite direction may occur.

 

There is no doubt that, if left untreated, severe angular limb deformities cause big problems for horses and the result is often osteoarthritis of the joints which have been put under excessive pressure by the poorly balanced limb.

 

Veterinary surgeons have become so proficient at these corrective surgeries that they are becoming very widely used, even for minor conformational abnormalities. Therefore, the possible disadvantages must be discussed.

 

Are there any downsides to such surgery?

In 2006, Santschi et al reported on their findings from studying the conformation of 199 thoroughbred foals from birth to yearling auction age, and found that knee and fetlock conformations change greatly with foals, generally becoming less carpal valgus and more fetlock varus as they become older.

 

This could lead the reader to suggest that it may be difficult to ‘correct’ a foal’s conformation to exactly the right degree as its conformation is likely to alter after corrective surgery has had its effect. However, in reality veterinary surgeons are now so good at judging these corrective surgeries that this is rarely a problem. The only significant practical downside of the surgeries seems to be the minimal scars and white hairs that can be left after the procedures, if the breeder is unlucky – although one or two do attempt to fix this with a little boot polish at the sales!

 

From an auction sale point of view, these corrective surgeries are excellent and have very few disadvantages.

 

However, the final important issue is whether performing all of these corrective surgeries is good for the racing careers of the horses concerned or, indeed, the breed as a whole.

 

In 2004, Anderson, McIlwraith and Douay published a paper in the Equine Veterinary Journal on the role of conformation in musculoskeletal problems in the racing thoroughbred, and the highly-respected Professor Wayne McIlwraith presented his findings at the Thoroughbred Racing and Breeding Seminar at Cheltenham racecourse.


He made two significant points. First, he came to the slightly unexpected conclusion that a degree of carpal valgus, which many are currently ‘correcting’, is actually a good thing and may serve as a protective mechanism for soundness.

 

Second, he argued that we should try to “manipulate Mother Nature” when we need to and suggested that corrective surgery is not always helpful and can actually contribute to unsoundness.

 

Widespread use does spark some concerns

In summary, corrective surgeries are excellent procedures for the treatment of extreme angular limb deformities. However, their widespread use leads everyone involved in the thoroughbred industry to have two serious concerns.

 

First, is it correct to be performing so many surgeries? Second, should vendors be made to disclose which yearlings at the auction sales have had such corrective surgeries?

 

The second concern is exactly what the North American Consignors and Commercial Breeders Association have been suggesting for some time.

THE FESTIVAL OF SPEED

Thunder Key
(Photo : Gold Circle)

As a country with something of an obsession for speed, the South African racing calendar honours our sprinting talent on a regular basis. No gathering of the nation’s best sprinters however, expresses this more forcibly than the Festival Of Speed, a four race bonanza of Grade One events scheduled for this weekend. The top event on the card is always the Golden Horse Casino Sprint, which has been thrown open this year by the early retirement of Summerhill-bred, Rebel King, and his stable companion, Warm White Night. Nonetheless, the farm is represented by Pegasus Emblem, bred and raised here for our long-serving patrons, Malcolm Wishart and Luigi Cirigiliano, while Muhtafal has the game winner of his last start, Thunder Key, under starter’s orders.

While the betting for the S.A. Fillies’ Sprint is likely to be dominated by Charles Laird’s Merlene de Largo (four wins from five starts to date), Bruce Gardiner and Co’s Lisa Anne (Summerhill-bred by the late lamented Rambo Dancer) makes her Grade One debut for the Alexander stable under the capable tutelage of Kevin Shea. Also in the field (and not without a squeak) is Anthony Delpech’s mount, Noble Heir (by Kahal), a promising second to Moccachino in Gauteng’s Camellia Stakes just over a month ago.

Kahal’s loss is Malhub’s gain:

Rare for a race in which we’ve supplied two of the last three winners, we are without a runner in the Gold Reef Medallion (for two-year-colts). The field is packed with the progeny of the first season sire, Var, and two interesting runners by leading Australian sires, Redoute’s Choice and Exceed and Excel for Mike de Kock and Charles Laird respectively. The form here is not that well exposed, and the winner could come from any quarter.

Turning to the subject of our headline, ‘Kahal’s loss is Malhub’s gain’, the Alan Robertson Fillies Championship (for Juvenile Fillies) has been robbed of its one star attraction in the form of Kahal’s daughter, Spring Clover, widely touted as the top juvenile filly in the country. This does however open the race to a number of possibilities, and a strong claim can be made for Malhub’s talented daughters, Ashjaan (bred at Summerhill for Sheikh Hamdan’s Shadwell Stud), who was just a length and a quarter behind Spring Clover in their last meeting, and the unbeaten Onehundredacrewood, both graduates of the Summerhill draft at last November’s Emperor’s Palace Ready To Run, where they cost R190 000 and R85 000 respectively.

We’d have to concede that for a horse of his own world-class, Malhub’s first crop was something of a disappointment to us, but he has more than made up for it with his second crop of juveniles, in much the same way as our standard-bearer Northern Guest, did in his time. Three of Malhub’s 2009 models have already earned Black type, and the fourth (Onehundredacrewood), is thus far unbeaten.

By Monday morning, it’s possible Malhub might’ve ascended back to the heights of that memorable day at Royal Ascot, when he got to meet The Queen after slaughtering the champions Johannesburg and Invincible Sprit in the Golden Jubilee Sprint (Gr.1).

SADLER'S WELLS : From Zero to Hero

bill oppenheim sadlers wells

 

From Zero to Hero

“Extract from the desk of Bill Oppenheim
www.thoroughbreddailynews.com

In today’s Thoroughbred Daily News, the world’s premier stallion commentator, Bill Oppenheim, writes that Sadler’s Wells is arguably the greatest sire in European history.

 

A very high-class three-year-old of 1984 (the same crop as Rainbow Quest and Darshaan), he went to stud in 1985, and his first foals were born in 1986. At the time, European sire power was at its nadir, and he led the renaissance in European sire power that today keeps many more top European mares in Europe instead of Kentucky. He’s also probably the most prolific stallion in history.


In 21 crops of racing age through the end of 2008, Sadler’s Wells had sired a truly phenomenal total of 2,149 foals… yes, that’s an average of 102 foals per crop. Even more phenomenal, Equineline tells us he has sired 280 black-type winners worldwide (13 percent of foals), and he’s also the damsire of 183 black-type winners to date. He has been champion sire in Britain and Ireland 14 times, and Primus Advertising in Ireland, which keeps track of such things, estimates he has had over 200 sons go to stud.


Yet, on 1 January 2004, little more than five years ago, there was no Sadler’s Wells sire line to speak of. He had about four really successful sons: In the Wings, who in turn sired Singspiel; Gr1 Breeders’ Cup Mile winner Barathea; El Prado, who went to stud cheaply in Kentucky in 1993, but ended up the second-best sire in North America from that year’s crop of stallions (numero uno is A.P. Indy), and who topped the North American General Sire List in 2002, when Medaglia d’Oro was a three-year-old; and Fort Wood, in South Africa. Beyond those, it was getting harder and harder to argue that Sadler’s Wells was a successful sire of sires.


Enter onto the scene Montjeu. He was very possibly the very best of the 280 black-type winners Sadler’s Wells has yet sired. Winner of the Gr1 French and Gr1 Irish Derbies and the Gr1 Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe at three, he won three more Group 1’s at four, including an imperious win in the King George and Queen Elizabeth Stakes, where he looked like a group horse in a maiden race. Timeform rated Montjeu at 137 both at three and at four. Yet, when he went to stud in 2001, his fee was a modest IrPound,30,000, a fraction of what his barnmate Giant’s Causeway commanded in the same season, his first year at stud. That’s all you could stand top-class 12 furlong horses for when they went to stud.


Our Insta-Tistics tables (on the TDN website) tell us that, in 2002, a total of 21 weanlings from Montjeu’s first crop averaged the equivalent of $99,982, with a median of $80,000. The conformation judges liked his first foals, and even though there was a certain amount of support from the Coolmore legions, his foals at the European sales impressed neutral pinhookers and other objective observers (as had Cape Cross the year before).


These figures represented excellent return for their breeders. You know how the Coolmore team likes to give their stallions a chance, so there were 66 yearlings sold from Montjeu’s first crop in 2003. They averaged $144,928, with a median just under $100,000, still a good return on investment for their breeders.


Montjeu’s fee for 2004, the year his first two-year-olds would race, was set at Eur30,000, the same as the year before.


Montjeu’s first crop, racing in 2004, included 16 winners, headed by the Gr1 Racing Post Trophy winner Motivator, and he finished third on the 2004 European Freshman Sire List. His stud fee was up to Eur45,000 for 2005, which looked dirt cheap by that autumn, considering not only did Motivator win the Gr1 Epsom Derby, but Montjeu’s first crop included two more Classic winners as well: Hurricane Run won the Gr1 Irish Derby; and Scorpion won the Gr1 St. Leger Stakes, though his more important victory came in the Gr1 Grand Prix de Paris in its first year as a 2400 meter race on Bastille Day - effectively, the “new” French Derby. After Hurricane Run won another little Group 1 contest, the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe, Montjeu ranked second only to Danehill on the 2005 European Sire List (historical lists supplied to us courtesy of John Quinlan at Hyperion Promotions). Not surprisingly, Montjeu’s 2006 fee shot up to Eur125,000.


By 2001, the year his 13th crop were three-year-olds, Sadler’s Wells had sired the winners of nearly every Group 1 race beyond a mile in Europe, but he had never sired a winner of the Gr1 Epsom Derby. Galileo rectified that small gap in his resume, then went on to win the Gr1 Irish Derby and Gr1 King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes. In Timeform’s lengthy essay on Galileo in Racehorses of 2004, they refer to Aidan O’Brien’s determination to run Galileo over shorter, even as short as a mile, in the Gr1 Queen Elizabeth Stakes at Ascot in late September. His two final starts were in fact at 10 furlongs - he was edged out by Fantastic Light in the Gr1 Irish Champion Stakes, and finally finished a non-threatening sixth, behind Tiznow and Sakhee, in the 2001 Gr1 Breeders’ Cup Classic on dirt at Belmont Park. One thing about Sadler’s Wells: he’s never been a sire of dirt horses, so why El Prado is such a good dirt sire? Who knows?


Galileo’s first foals were born in 2003, but he was only 11th on the 2005 European Freshman Sire List, the year Montjeu’s first three-year-olds put him second on the European Sire List. But when Galileo’s first crop got to be three-year-olds, it was a different story. His seven three-year- old graded/group stakes winners that year included two Classic winners; Gr1 Irish 1000 Guineas winner Nighttime and Gr1 St. Leger Stakes winner Sixties Icon, as well as Gr1 Breeders’ Cup Turf winner Red Rocks. And throw in Teofilo, the first of two consecutive champion European two year-olds by Galileo trained by Jim Bolger, and you won’t be surprised to hear Galileo’s stud fee went from Eur37,500 in 2006 (this year’s two-year-olds) to Eur150,000 in 2007 (this year’s yearlings). Galileo was seventh on the 2006 European Sire List; Montjeu was third, behind Coolmore barnmates Danehill and Danehill Dancer.


In 2007, Galileo advanced to second behind Danehill, with Montjeu again third. Danehill ran out of three-year-olds in 2008; Galileo claimed top spot on the European Sire List, with Montjeu second. I’ve mentioned several times in the past that I call Montjeu “The Derby Sire,” because in four crops of three-year-olds he’s sired six winners of 12-furlong races that are, or amount to, Derbies: Motivator and Authorized have won the Gr1 Epsom Derby; Hurricane Run and Frozen Fire (2008) have won the Gr1 Irish Derby; and Scorpion and Montmartre (2008) have won the Gr1 Grand Prix de Paris since it became a 12-furlong race in 2006. This year’s Gr1 Investec Epsom Derby favorite, Fame and Glory, is from Montjeu’s fifth crop of three-year-olds, and, scarily, won the Gr2 Derrinstown Derby Trial with a higher Racing Post Rating (speed figure, 120) than either Galileo or High Chaparral (also by Sadler’s Wells), who both won the Derrinstown with RPR’s of 119.


For his part, Galileo had sired nine Group 1 winners in his first three crops by the end of 2008.


Besides Nighttime, Sixties Icon, Red Rocks and Teofilo, they include 2007 champion European two-year-old and 2008 Gr1 Epsom Derby winner New Approach; Gr1 Irish Derby winner Soldier of Fortune (bred by Jim Bolger); triple 2008 Group 1 winner Lush Lashes (trained by Jim Bolger); Gr1 Prix Royal-Oak winner Allegretto; and 2008 Gr1 Italian Derby winner Cima de Triomphe, now trained by Luca Cumani and very much a horse to watch in the top races in 2009 once the ground gets faster again.


Interestingly, though the Maktoum family clearly no longer patronizes Coolmore stallions at the yearling sales, they have nothing against buying them privately later, by which method they acquired Authorized (by Montjeu) and Galileo’s two juvenile champ, Teofilo and New Approach, from Jim Bolger. Coolmore, which after all does still have the “factories” – Montjeu and Galileo themselves - stands only Hurricane Run (by Montjeu).


Then again, we could take a look at the list of Aidan O’Brien’s seven three-year-olds that could line up for the June 6 Gr1 Investec Epsom Derby: all seven are by Sadler’s Wells and sons. Two are by Sadler’s Wells himself (Gr2 Dante winner Black Bear Island and Gr3 Chester Vase second Masterofthehorse), one, favorite Fame and Glory, is by Montjeu; three are by Galileo (Gr1 English 2000 Guineas fourth Rip Van Winkle, Gr2 Dante second Freemantle and Gr3 Lingfield Derby Trial winner Age of Aquarius); and one is by 2002 Gr1 Epsom Derby winner High Chaparral. His second crop of three-year-olds, this year, looks much better than his first.


A final observation: it seems like the connections of every Gr1 Epsom Derby winner go to great lengths to prove that their Derby winner is not “just” a 12-furlong horse because of a perception (never actually validated, from what I can tell) that breeders will be quicker to send mares if they can prove the horse at 10 furlongs as well. So guess what? The two top sires in Europe, Galileo and Montjeu, were both 12-furlong horses; each won at least two of the three major European Derbies (though that was when the Prix du Jockey-Club was 12 furlongs), plus a 12-furlong Group 1 race open to older horses. That 10-furlong deal? It’s a complete myth. Get the right 12 furlong horse and you can top the charts.


How El Prado came to be one of America’s leading sires, and is now threatening to open a branch of the Sadler’s Wells line on the dirt, is still a bit of a mystery to everyone involved. He was a Group 1 winner at two for Vincent O’Brien, having won what Timeform described in Racehorses of 1991 as “a particularly substandard running of the [Gr1] National S….” Timeform did rate him 119 at two, but that seemed almost more by virtue of his win at the end of the season in the Gr2 Beresford Stakes over a mile. El Prado didn’t reappear until halfway through his three year-old season, was unplaced in three starts at eight and 10 furlongs, and was packed off to stud in Kentucky. He was always a pretty useful sire, but not until his sixth crop did Medaglia d’Oro appear, and his eighth crop included three $2-million earners, turf champion Kitten’s Joy and Gr1 Breeders’ Cup Mile winner Artie Schiller on the grass, and Gr1 Jockey Club Gold Cup winner Borrego on the dirt. He was Leading Sire in North America in 2002, and second in 2003 and 2004.


Though he’s done well enough in Europe, and gets his share of good grass horses in North America, the truth is El Prado has really got where he is more by siring durable dirt horses with some class than by following the sire line’s otherwise all-turf pattern; he’s succeeded because his runners have successfully adapted to different conditions - dirt. And his very best horse, Medaglia d’Oro, never saw the grass except when they took him out from Frankel’s barn to graze on it - he won $5.7 million racing exclusively on dirt. And from 13 stakes horses to date in his first crop, only one has even placed in a stakes on turf; he has two graded stakes winners on synthetics, but the rest, including the mighty Gr1 Preakness winner Rachel Alexandra, have been on dirt. Also, 11 of his first 13 stakes horses are fillies, though whether that means anything, it would be far too early to know.


So, in five years, the great Sadler’s Wells’ prospects as a sire of sires have gone from doubtful to the point where he had the one-two sires in Europe last year, and the hottest dirt sire in North America right now. It’s a pretty big forward move.

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Breeding Racehorses : A Matter of Family

 goss family

The Goss Family
(Summerhill Sires Brochure 2008/2009)

 

The tradition of producing quality racehorses goes back almost eight decades among the Gosses. But their admiration for horses as a family has its origins in ancient Ireland, before the Battle of Boyne.

 

Ever since, they’ve held a warm affection for the sport of horseracing, and especially for the animals at the heart of it. The custodianship of that association was never more proudly revered than under the stewardships of Mick’s great grandfather, Edward, his grandfather Pat, and his own father Bryan, and today the manifestation of their obsession lies in everything you see at Summerhill.

 

It is true that in modern times, Summerhill” is a splendid, much-envied brand. Because in the eighty years since they first started breeding racehorses on a tiny scale at The Springs in east Griqualand, the Goss family have never breached the founding principles of excellence and audaciousness, laid down by the man who embodied them.

 

What you’re looking at here, all over again, is history. And more history, in the making. And you’re more than welcome to join us in making some of your own. Because there’s one thing that’s as true today as it was at the Battle of Boyne. We only win if you do.

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